Looking for a training program to prepare for long distance tour

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by rlittrell, Dec 16, 2004.

  1. rlittrell

    rlittrell New Member

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    I am new to cycling and as of yet do not even have a bike. I am 24 and pretty fit already. I weight train 4 days a weak and warm up with 2 mile runs.

    I am planing to complete a southern tier coast to coast tour by summer of 2005, which gives me 5 months to prepare. This leads me to several questions.

    1. Since I dont have a bike as of yet, I am training indoors (Ballys Total Fitness). Can anyone suggest some training workouts to help me reach my goal?

    2. Once I purchase a bike, what type of workouts should I do to prepare for my goal?

    3. Finally, any recomendations on touring Bikes or other equipment?


    I am not familiar with all of the abreviations (BPM, etc) used so if you could be really descriptive I would appreciate it.

    Thanks,
    Ryan
     
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  2. TrekCyclerChic

    TrekCyclerChic New Member

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    Well I was sort of in your position this spring... I was using a super cheap mtn bike (with shocks no less) to do my biking on, and I made up the rest in running until i got my bike. I'm still an amateur, but here are some suggestions/things I've learned so far that might help you get started.

    As far as equiptment, I bought a Trek 1500 which is an amazing bike. It retails for $1200, but it is a great bike, with a stiff frame and good components. I looked at many bikes and it was the most bike for the money. It's a nice big step above the entry level road bikes for not that much more money.

    Since you said it is long distance, that's what you need to be doing in your workouts - distance! Put on the miles. You need to establish a good base to work off of later. Try to get at least one long ride (nearly as much as you will be doing in one day of the ride) at least once a week. There is no other workout that can replace just getting in the seat and pedaling. You need lots of miles and once you get your bike, you really need to become familiar with it, and with the movements of biking. This can hlep you avoid mishaps, like spills and dropped chains caused by moving the wrong way at the wrong time.

    Hope this helps. I'm starting my base training for the PMC next summer, so let me know if you want to talk more about it.
     
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