Looking for chefs trick to make parsley look glossy

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Pierre, Mar 15, 2005.

  1. Pierre

    Pierre Guest

    Anyone know of a chefs trick that would make flat leaf parsley make
    extra green, succulent, and shiney? Its for a food presentation
    project.

    Pierre
     
    Tags:


  2. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Pierre wrote:
    > Anyone know of a chefs trick that would make flat leaf parsley make
    > extra green, succulent, and shiney? Its for a food presentation
    > project.


    Fertilizer.
     
  3. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Pierre" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone know of a chefs trick that would make flat leaf parsley make
    > extra green, succulent, and shiney? Its for a food presentation
    > project.
    >
    > Pierre
    >


    Post this question in one or more of the photography newsgroups. Years ago,
    a glycerine-based spray was one way of doing this, but I'm sure there are
    multiple ways of doing it.
     
  4. Pierre

    Pierre Guest

    Doug Kanter wrote:
    >
    > Post this question in one or more of the photography newsgroups.

    Years ago,
    > a glycerine-based spray was one way of doing this, but I'm sure there

    are
    > multiple ways of doing it.


    Thanks Doug; good idea. I appreciate your helpful response. I'll poke
    around their archives. Bound to be something.



    Pierre
     
  5. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Pierre" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > Doug Kanter wrote:
    >>
    >> Post this question in one or more of the photography newsgroups.

    > Years ago,
    >> a glycerine-based spray was one way of doing this, but I'm sure there

    > are
    >> multiple ways of doing it.

    >
    > Thanks Doug; good idea. I appreciate your helpful response. I'll poke
    > around their archives. Bound to be something.
    >
    >
    >
    > Pierre
    >


    You might also poke around www.rit.edu (Rochester Institute of Technology).
    That school's got a photography program, and some schools put their course
    work notes online. Another would be www.syracuse.edu. Look for the Gannet
    school of communications.
     
  6. Pierre wrote:

    > Anyone know of a chefs trick that would make flat leaf parsley make
    > extra green, succulent, and shiney? Its for a food presentation
    > project.


    If you're not going to eat it, freshen it in soapy water. It will take
    up a good bit of it and become plumped. No matter what else you do
    with it, this is a good first step.

    1) Dry it and mist it with Pam of any other spray like it.

    2) Food stylists use glycerin to make sparkles, but completely coating
    the leaves would be difficult because of the viscosity of the
    glycerin. If it's for a short term show - under 1/2 hour or so, I'd go
    for the oil spray.

    3) Once I used leaf shine spray that I bought at a florist's shop to
    make kale shiny. It was a pain but worked fine.

    Happy leaves...

    Pastorio
     
  7. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    > 2) Food stylists use glycerin to make sparkles, but completely coating
    > the leaves would be difficult because of the viscosity of the glycerin.
    > If it's for a short term show - under 1/2 hour or so, I'd go for the oil
    > spray.
    >



    If it doesn't have to be edible, what about thinning the glycerin with
    rubbing alcohol? Or vodka, if it does have to be edible?

    Bob
     
  8. zxcvbob wrote:

    > Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> 2) Food stylists use glycerin to make sparkles, but completely coating
    >> the leaves would be difficult because of the viscosity of the
    >> glycerin. If it's for a short term show - under 1/2 hour or so, I'd go
    >> for the oil spray.
    >>

    > If it doesn't have to be edible, what about thinning the glycerin with
    > rubbing alcohol? Or vodka, if it does have to be edible?


    And if you don't use all the vodka on the stupid parsley...

    Pastorio
     
  9. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "Pierre" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Anyone know of a chefs trick that would make flat leaf parsley make
    > extra green, succulent, and shiney? Its for a food presentation
    > project.
    >
    > Pierre


    Yep.

    Treat the parsley as you would any cut flower.

    Trim the bottom of the stems and place in a glass with a little water and
    store in a cool place.

    Dimitri
     
  10. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> Bob (this one) wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> 2) Food stylists use glycerin to make sparkles, but completely
    >>> coating the leaves would be difficult because of the viscosity of the
    >>> glycerin. If it's for a short term show - under 1/2 hour or so, I'd
    >>> go for the oil spray.
    >>>

    >> If it doesn't have to be edible, what about thinning the glycerin with
    >> rubbing alcohol? Or vodka, if it does have to be edible?

    >
    >
    > And if you don't use all the vodka on the stupid parsley...
    >
    > Pastorio
    >



    Well, I'd hate for it to go to waste...

    Bob
     
  11. Del Cecchi

    Del Cecchi Guest

    Pierre wrote:
    > Doug Kanter wrote:
    >
    >>Post this question in one or more of the photography newsgroups.

    >
    > Years ago,
    >
    >>a glycerine-based spray was one way of doing this, but I'm sure there

    >
    > are
    >
    >>multiple ways of doing it.

    >
    >
    > Thanks Doug; good idea. I appreciate your helpful response. I'll poke
    > around their archives. Bound to be something.
    >
    >
    >
    > Pierre
    >

    gloss water base polyurethane. You're not going to eat it but just
    look/photograph?
     
  12. Pierre

    Pierre Guest

    Del Cecchi wrote:
    ><snip>
    > gloss water base polyurethane. You're not going to eat it but just
    > look/photograph?


    It's going to be a "nest" for food; the food will be eaten not the
    parsley.

    I'll take pix too, yes.

    Pierre
     
  13. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    Pierre wrote:
    >
    > Anyone know of a chefs trick that would make flat leaf parsley make
    > extra green, succulent, and shiney? Its for a food presentation
    > project.
    >
    > Pierre


    Brush it with a light coating of veg oil or even medical mineral oil. It
    will still be edible.
     
  14. zxcvbob wrote:

    > Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    >> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>
    >>> Bob (this one) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> 2) Food stylists use glycerin to make sparkles, but completely
    >>>> coating the leaves would be difficult because of the viscosity of
    >>>> the glycerin. If it's for a short term show - under 1/2 hour or so,
    >>>> I'd go for the oil spray.
    >>>>
    >>> If it doesn't have to be edible, what about thinning the glycerin
    >>> with rubbing alcohol? Or vodka, if it does have to be edible?

    >>
    >> And if you don't use all the vodka on the stupid parsley...
    >>
    >> Pastorio
    >>

    > Well, I'd hate for it to go to waste...


    Exactly. Leaving it all alone in the bottle like that...

    Who knows what could happen to it?

    Pastorio
     
  15. On Wed 16 Mar 2005 04:12:40a, Bob (this one) wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> Bob (this one) wrote:
    >>
    >>> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Bob (this one) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> 2) Food stylists use glycerin to make sparkles, but completely
    >>>>> coating the leaves would be difficult because of the viscosity of
    >>>>> the glycerin. If it's for a short term show - under 1/2 hour or so,
    >>>>> I'd go for the oil spray.
    >>>>>
    >>>> If it doesn't have to be edible, what about thinning the glycerin
    >>>> with rubbing alcohol? Or vodka, if it does have to be edible?
    >>>
    >>> And if you don't use all the vodka on the stupid parsley...
    >>>
    >>> Pastorio
    >>>

    >> Well, I'd hate for it to go to waste...

    >
    > Exactly. Leaving it all alone in the bottle like that...
    >
    > Who knows what could happen to it?


    It could get drunk.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  16. "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Wed 16 Mar 2005 04:12:40a, Bob (this one) wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > zxcvbob wrote:
    > >
    > >> Bob (this one) wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> zxcvbob wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> Bob (this one) wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> And if you don't use all the vodka on the stupid parsley...
    > >>>
    > >>> Pastorio
    > >>>
    > >> Well, I'd hate for it to go to waste...

    > >
    > > Exactly. Leaving it all alone in the bottle like that...
    > >
    > > Who knows what could happen to it?

    >
    > It could get drunk.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright


    Better than the cook. With enough vodka, the cook might start ironing the
    curly parsley to make it flat. Then again, would that really be so bad?

    Charlie, Stoli hugger
     
  17. Charles Gifford wrote:

    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>On Wed 16 Mar 2005 04:12:40a, Bob (this one) wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>>zxcvbob wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Bob (this one) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>zxcvbob wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>Bob (this one) wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>And if you don't use all the vodka on the stupid parsley...
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Pastorio
    >>>>>
    >>>>Well, I'd hate for it to go to waste...
    >>>
    >>>Exactly. Leaving it all alone in the bottle like that...
    >>>
    >>>Who knows what could happen to it?

    >>
    >>It could get drunk.

    >
    > Better than the cook. With enough vodka, the cook might start ironing the
    > curly parsley to make it flat. Then again, would that really be so bad?


    Pshaw, I say. The conscientious parsley shiner would get the flatleaf
    so no ironing necessary. That being the case, more time and energy to
    deal more properly with the vodka. Anybody knows that.

    Pastorio
     
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