Looking for old bike parts - links welcome

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Toxicdistortion, May 14, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Greetings!

    First time poster here but longtime Usenet junkie :)

    Anyway, my situation is somewhat bleak. I have an old Specialized bike set up as a road bike (not
    sure exactly what "kind" of frame it has, road or touring or what). The bike was given to me out of
    the blue many years ago, and I have been riding it ever since. I figure this bike would have been
    new in the mid 80's. The problem now is wear and tear. I'm looking for links, hints, tips, advice
    on where I can find some old parts for this bike. It's a 15 speed and the rear gears are pretty
    worn, causing the chain to slip. I've been told that rear 5 gear cassettes (did I use the right
    term?) are next to non existent. Also the rear fork is so narrow that there's really no room to
    "fudge" anything.

    I really like this bike and would hate to have to scrap it. I know modifications can be done but I'm
    just not sure it would be very cost effective. Any help greatly appreciated.

    TIA!

    -gk-
     
    Tags:


  2. "Toxicdistortion" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Yeah, these guys mentioned that, but then I could find myself getting
    into
    > an upgrade that I can't really afford. What I want is to to ride my bike without the gears
    > slipping. Of course, that may not be possible without
    a
    > significant upgrade.
    >
    > *sigh*
    >

    You don't have to upgrade anything. All you need is a new freewheel (or cassette) and a new chain.
    Try Harris Cyclery as someone else mentioned http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/freewheels.html .
    They have a Shimano uniglide freewheel listed at $19.95 and they have Suntour freewheels for $39.95.

    So by the time you add up a chain, freewheel and either a freewheel tool or a shop to install it, it
    might cost a bit more than you'd like, but it's not really that bad, it's your bike, how could you
    live without it?
     
  3. I think you are looking for a five speed freewheel. You can get one at big-wheel.com. Regards, Ernie

    Toxicdistortion wrote:

    > Greetings!
    >
    > First time poster here but longtime Usenet junkie :)
    >
    > Anyway, my situation is somewhat bleak. I have an old Specialized bike set up as a road bike (not
    > sure exactly what "kind" of frame it has, road or touring or what). The bike was given to me out
    > of the blue many years ago, and I have been riding it ever since. I figure this bike would have
    > been new in the mid 80's. The problem now is wear and tear. I'm looking for links, hints, tips,
    > advice on where I can find some old parts for this bike. It's a 15 speed and the rear gears are
    > pretty worn, causing the chain to slip. I've been told that rear 5 gear cassettes (did I use the
    > right term?) are next to non existent. Also the rear fork is so narrow that there's really no room
    > to "fudge" anything.
    >
    > I really like this bike and would hate to have to scrap it. I know modifications can be done but
    > I'm just not sure it would be very cost effective. Any help greatly appreciated.
    >
    > TIA!
    >
    > -gk-
     
  4. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "one of the six billion"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    > You don't have to upgrade anything. All you need is a new freewheel (or cassette) and a new
    > chain. Try Harris Cyclery as someone else mentioned
    > http://www.sheldonbrown.com/harris/freewheels.html . They have a Shimano uniglide freewheel
    > listed at $19.95 and they have Suntour freewheels for $39.95.

    The last 5-spd HyperGlide clone I bought (just over 2 years ago) cost all of $10. Likewise the new
    PC-48 chain to go with it. 5 bux for the LBS guy to remove the old weirdo freewheel that I wanted to
    replace (he only wanted to charge me 2 bux, but I was appreciative).

    I wouldn't replace old 2-notch SunTour freewheels with the same thing -- because I absolutely
    *detest* that freewheel- remover-killing, 2-notch configuration. HyperGlide splines are such a sweet
    improvement. And HyperGlides are a little less obsolete, they're cheap enough, and are a lot more
    available locally. SunTour, UniGlide and HyperGlide all screw just as well onto the same hub.
    Getting them _off_ is an horse of a different colour. HyperGlides are so pleasantly easy to remove.

    > So by the time you add up a chain, freewheel and either a freewheel tool or a shop to install it,
    > it might cost a bit more than you'd like, but it's not really that bad, it's your bike, how could
    > you live without it?
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    Exactly!

    In the long run, there's no such thing as a free bike. Maybe even a cheap bike. Transportation
    always costs money, whether in shoe leather, carfare, bicycle parts, or fuel.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. In article <[email protected]>, "Toxicdistortion"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Ryan Cousineau" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > In article <[email protected]>, "Toxicdistortion" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > > Greetings!
    > > >
    > > > First time poster here but longtime Usenet junkie :)
    > > >
    > > > Anyway, my situation is somewhat bleak. I have an old Specialized bike
    > set
    > > > up as a road bike (not sure exactly what "kind" of frame it has, road
    >
    > > Hm. is it a cassette or a freewheel? in the former, the freewheeling mechanism (the "freehub")
    > > stays with the wheel when you slied the cogs off. in the latter, the freewheel and gears screw
    > > off the bike as a unit.
    >
    > Thanks for the quick reply. The guys at the shop next to where I work told me I have Suntour
    > gears, and that (please bare with me here) you unscrew the outer gear and the rest slide off.
    > Anyway, that's what they told me.

    Ach! A Suntour cassette. Rare bird...

    http://www.bikepro.com/arch_products/freewheels/asunt.html

    I can't even tell you if an upgrade for your hub is available, but I doubt it.

    Okay, best upgrade path is something like this: buy a new wheel with a Shimano-compatible hub and
    cassette. The cheapest upgrade is to buy a new hub and cassette and relace your old rim and spokes
    into it. Unless you have done this before or have a lot of time right now, I'd recommend against it.

    > > > I really like this bike and would hate to have to scrap it. I know modifications can be done
    > > > but I'm just not sure it would be very cost effective. Any help greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > A bike that age is probably steel. if so, you can spread the rear triangle, replace (at worst)
    > > the rear wheel, and upgrade to anything.
    >
    > Yeah, these guys mentioned that, but then I could find myself getting into an upgrade that I can't
    > really afford. What I want is to to ride my bike without the gears slipping. Of course, that may
    > not be possible without a significant upgrade.

    Significant, but not hard. Replace the rear wheel. Cost, about $50 or so. The cassette will be
    extra, maybe another $20-40. Your LBS will know what to do.

    --
    Ryan Cousineau, [email protected] http://www.sfu.ca/~rcousine President, Fabrizio Mazzoleni Fan Club
     
  6. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Ryan Cousineau <[email protected]> writes:

    > Ach! A Suntour cassette. Rare bird...

    Bring out the chainwhips. Or take it to the Bike Shop Guy to remove it for ya.

    > http://www.bikepro.com/arch_products/freewheels/asunt.html

    Which (rightly, IMO) suggests: "If you own a Suntour cassette rear hub, you may still find a Suntour
    splines cassette at your local bicycle store, but you should mentally prepare to replace the rear
    hub, with something that has the Shimano Hyperglide spline pattern."

    > I can't even tell you if an upgrade for your hub is available, but I doubt it.
    >
    > Okay, best upgrade path is something like this: buy a new wheel with a Shimano-compatible hub and
    > cassette.

    I'll second that.

    Get a nice, new, fairly contemporary, already-built rear wheel and cassette/freewheel. And a new
    chain to go with it.

    Then, maybe we gotta look at those ol' 3-bolt chainrings ;-) (but probably, not ... for now).

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  7. Grenouil

    Grenouil Guest

    "Toxicdistortion" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Greetings!
    >
    > First time poster here but longtime Usenet junkie :)
    >
    > Anyway, my situation is somewhat bleak. I have an old
    Specialized bike set
    > up as a road bike (not sure exactly what "kind" of frame
    it has, road or
    > touring or what). The bike was given to me out of the
    blue many years ago,
    > and I have been riding it ever since. I figure this bike
    would have been
    > new in the mid 80's. The problem now is wear and tear.
    I'm looking for
    > links, hints, tips, advice on where I can find some old
    parts for this bike.
    > It's a 15 speed and the rear gears are pretty worn,
    causing the chain to
    > slip. I've been told that rear 5 gear cassettes (did I
    use the right term?)
    > are next to non existent. Also the rear fork is so narrow
    that there's
    > really no room to "fudge" anything.
    >
    > I really like this bike and would hate to have to scrap
    it. I know
    > modifications can be done but I'm just not sure it would
    be very cost
    > effective. Any help greatly appreciated.
    >
    > TIA!
    >
    > -gk-
    >
    >

    1) Try - http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&Category=5 - for cheap parts. Or try eBay - but
    watch for "silly" prices, and even sillier "shipping" charges

    2) Do a magnet test to determine what the frame material is. If it's steel, you can fairly easily
    spread the dropouts to about 130mm - see http://www.sheldonbrown.com/frame-spacing.html for
    details. If you spread the frame you can add spacers to the rear axle and use a 6, 7, or even 8
    speed freewheel - assuming you have downtube friction shifters, or want to invest in some
    indexed shifters
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...