looking for ski/bike roof rack help

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Monique Y. Herm, Mar 13, 2004.

  1. So, I got this new WRX wagon a couple of weeks ago. I have a
    good idea of what I want to do, but not how to do it.
    Yakima's website has a cool selection tool, but I want to
    make sure I buy exactly what I need and no more -- these
    parts are expensive!

    I already have a Yakima big powderhound, which is a six-wide
    ski rack. What I'd like to do is get extra-wide crossbars
    and put a steelhead bike mount on either side of the ski
    rack. (To save money, I could possibly steal the bike mounts
    from Eric's car.) And, of course, it all needs lock cores.

    The car came from the factory with standard-length crossbars
    already attached to the rails.

    So, here are my questions:

    1) I've heard that the spoiler on the hatch door can
    interfere with the rack when you lift the door. Anyone
    have experience/advice about that? Will I be able to get
    into the back of my car with a rack on the top? With
    stuff on the rack?

    2) How long should my crossbars be to be roomy enough for
    the ski rack and two bike mounts? Yakima lists 48", 58",
    66", and 78" crossbars. I seem to remember Eric saying
    something about how his fairing attachment gets in the
    way of putting all three on the shortest bars; I don't
    know yet if I'll want a fairing.

    3) Should I mount the Yakima crossbars on top of the
    existing crossbars, or should I remove the existing
    crossbars? It seems awfully kludgy to have two layers
    of crossbars, but apparently some people use it that
    way. I've been told the factory crossbars are pretty
    easy to remove.

    4) (Related to three.) Yakima's site seems to indicate that
    all their clips mount into the door frame, which I'd like
    to avoid if at all possible. I mean, I already have the
    rails -- why should I have to stick things in the door?
    Anyone have any arrangements that don't require clipping
    into the door?

    5) (Also related to three, I think.) I'd like an arrangement
    where the rack is deep enough to accomodate ski bindings
    on the bottom as well as the top. How do I best go about
    doing that?

    6) Anything I haven't thought of?

    I apologize for posting rather than going through the trial
    and error myself. I know that these are awfully specific
    questions. I guess I'm hoping that someone has had need for
    this exact setup and can share their insight.

    --
    monique
     
    Tags:


  2. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Monique Y. Herman ran this through spell check:> I apologize
    for posting rather than going through the trial and error
    > myself. I know that these are awfully specific questions.
    > I guess I'm hoping that someone has had need for this
    > exact setup and can share their insight.

    who's your local Yakima dealer? I go to the mgear.com store,
    and we look uup the model and parts I have/need, and then we
    double check everyting out in the parking lot.

    penny
     
  3. On 2004-03-13, Penny S penned:
    > Monique Y. Herman ran this through spell check:> I
    > apologize for posting rather than going through the trial
    > and error
    >> myself. I know that these are awfully specific questions.
    >> I guess I'm hoping that someone has had need for this
    >> exact setup and can share their insight.
    >
    >
    > who's your local Yakima dealer? I go to the mgear.com
    > store, and we look uup the model and parts I have/need,
    > and then we double check everyting out in the parking lot.
    >

    I know the REI in Boulder carries Yakima, but I don't really
    think of them as that kind of service. OTOH, I get the
    member's refund at the end of the year ...

    It looks like there are about 400,000 places in the area
    that sell Yakima. One of them probably has the kind of
    service you're describing.

    No mgear.com, though. Looks like you have the good luck to
    live near their only bricks-n-mortar store.

    --
    monique
     
  4. Shawn Curry

    Shawn Curry Guest

    Monique Y. Herman wrote:

    > So, I got this new WRX wagon a couple of weeks ago. I have
    > a good idea of what I want to do, but not how to do it.
    > Yakima's website has a cool selection tool, but I want to
    > make sure I buy exactly what I need and no more -- these
    > parts are expensive!
    >

    >snip

    >
    > 2) How long should my crossbars be to be roomy enough for
    > the ski rack and two bike mounts? Yakima lists 48",
    > 58", 66", and 78" crossbars. I seem to remember Eric
    > saying something about how his fairing attachment gets
    > in the way of putting all three on the shortest bars; I
    > don't know yet if I'll want a fairing.

    See if you can fit everything on the 48". You'll be banging
    your head with the 58" or longer. May be worth it.

    >
    > 3) Should I mount the Yakima crossbars on top of the
    > existing crossbars, or should I remove the existing
    > crossbars? It seems awfully kludgy to have two layers
    > of crossbars, but apparently some people use it that
    > way. I've been told the factory crossbars are pretty
    > easy to remove.

    I took the factory rack crossbars off of my Legacy. Looks
    better (boy that's relative, considering its a maroon Legacy-
    I got it cheap) Easy to do.
    >
    > 4) (Related to three.) Yakima's site seems to indicate
    > that all their clips mount into the door frame, which
    > I'd like to avoid if at all possible. I mean, I already
    > have the rails -- why should I have to stick things in
    > the door? Anyone have any arrangements that don't
    > require clipping into the door?

    Check if the "Lowrider" towers fit your factory rack-fits
    Legacys (including 2004 I checked their site).
    >
    > 5) (Also related to three, I think.) I'd like an
    > arrangement where the rack is deep enough to accomodate
    > ski bindings on the bottom as well as the top. How do I
    > best go about doing that?

    Low rider plus factory rack still jacks things up a lot. I
    think Yak makes lifters for their racks too.
    >
    > 6) Anything I haven't thought of?

    Mightymounts hook directly to the factory rack.

    >
    > I apologize for posting rather than going through the
    > trial and error myself. I know that these are awfully
    > specific questions. I guess I'm hoping that someone has
    > had need for this exact setup and can share their insight.
     
  5. On 2004-03-13, Doki penned:
    >
    >
    > Why not just take the wheels off and chuck the bikes in
    > the boot (trunk)? Bike racks do very bad things to your
    > cars aerodynamics, and it's not like the back of a
    > Subaru's small. I get my bike the back of a Ka, which is
    > unimaginably small for an American ;). The other option
    > would be to get a tow bar mounted bike rack. Obviously
    > that'll get in the way of the hatch, but you don't have
    > the problem of getting a bike on top of the car.

    What's a Ka?

    Sure, there's room in the trunk, but I'd rather not run the
    risk of getting bike grease ground into a brand-new
    interior, and I also am not sure about how to stack bikes
    such that the pedals, gears, chain, etc don't interact in
    possibly unfortunate ways. I like being able to throw the
    bike in the back, but I also like the option of *not* doing
    so. In any case, I want a ski rack anyway so that I can take
    four people at once, so I might as well do the bike mounts
    as well. Getting the bike onto the roof won't be a problem
    -- I've been managing to get my bike onto my s.o.'s Dodge
    Intrepid (talk about a huge American car!) without too much
    trouble, once I figured out the proper grip.

    I really don't like rear racks -- they get in the way of the
    trunk/hatch, as you said. They also don't necessarily fit
    all bike models (my s.o.'s Y-frame, for example, is
    problematic), and I've heard it's a lot harder to lock the
    bikes down than it is to do so on a roof rack.

    --
    monique
     
  6. "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > I get my bike the back of a Ka, which is unimaginably
    > small for an American ;).

    Wow. Is it a folder? ;-)

    I rented a Ka for a week in Scotland. I was amazed that the
    thing could comfortably fit a 6'2" driver. The real comedy
    came from distinguishing the difference between "Ka" and
    "car" when spoken in a heavy Scot accent:

    "So you drove a Ka here?"

    "Um, of course. The little Ford out back."

    "No, I mean a 'Ka' car"

    "A ka ka?"

    And so on. They quickly decided I was nice enough, but
    obviously mildly retarded.

    CC
     
  7. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Corvus Corvax wrote:
    > "Doki" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> I get my bike the back of a Ka, which is unimaginably
    >> small for an American ;).
    >
    > Wow. Is it a folder? ;-)

    Fold the back seats of the car down, off with both wheels
    and because of the mudguard, the seatpost. It's a bit of a
    job, but no more than setting up a bike rack on the back
    of the car.

    > I rented a Ka for a week in Scotland. I was amazed that
    > the thing could comfortably fit a 6'2" driver. The real
    > comedy came from distinguishing the difference between
    > "Ka" and "car" when spoken in a heavy Scot accent:

    They'll do 110 on the speedo if you try hard enough too. If
    you go round corners quickly and keep up your momentum you
    can worry a BMW 330 ;).

    > "So you drove a Ka here?"
    >
    > "Um, of course. The little Ford out back."
    >
    > "No, I mean a 'Ka' car"
    >
    > "A ka ka?"
    >
    > And so on. They quickly decided I was nice enough, but
    > obviously mildly retarded.

    Yep. Ford started out selling it as the Ka, but now they've
    decided it's really pronounced K.A. :).
     
  8. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Monique Y. Herman wrote:
    > On 2004-03-13, Doki penned:
    >>
    >>
    >> Why not just take the wheels off and chuck the bikes in
    >> the boot (trunk)? Bike racks do very bad things to your
    >> cars aerodynamics, and it's not like the back of a
    >> Subaru's small. I get my bike the back of a Ka, which is
    >> unimaginably small for an American ;). The other option
    >> would be to get a tow bar mounted bike rack. Obviously
    >> that'll get in the way of the hatch, but you don't have
    >> the problem of getting a bike on top of the car.
    >
    > What's a Ka?

    A pretty small Ford. 1.3L engine (79 cubic inches :p),
    weighs less than a tonne and it was the first "new edge"
    Ford, it's probably still pretty odd looking even though
    you've got the Focus over there. Look here for a picture:
    www.zemancar.cz/images/ ford-ka.jpg.

    > Sure, there's room in the trunk, but I'd rather not run
    > the risk of getting bike grease ground into a brand-new
    > interior, and I also am not sure about how to stack bikes
    > such that the pedals, gears, chain, etc don't interact in
    > possibly unfortunate ways.

    If you can, get hold of a load box for the back, which will
    stop you ruining the carpets etc.

    > I like being able to throw the bike in the back, but I
    > also like the option of *not* doing so. In any case, I
    > want a ski rack anyway so that I can take four people at
    > once, so I might as well do the bike mounts as well.
    > Getting the bike onto the roof won't be a problem -- I've
    > been managing to get my bike onto my s.o.'s Dodge
    > Intrepid (talk about a huge American car!) without too
    > much trouble, once I figured out the proper grip.

    Fair enough. If you're driving a couple of hundred miles
    you'll save a worthwhile amount of petrol or raise your top
    speed by 20 or 30mph. I'd go for the extra speed ;).

    > I really don't like rear racks -- they get in the way of
    > the trunk/hatch, as you said. They also don't necessarily
    > fit all bike models (my s.o.'s Y-frame, for example, is
    > problematic), and I've heard it's a lot harder to lock the
    > bikes down than it is to do so on a roof rack.

    I reckon they're a pain in the arse too.
     
  9. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Monique Y. Herman ran this through spell check:
    > On 2004-03-13, Doki penned:
    >
    > I really don't like rear racks -- they get in the way of
    > the trunk/hatch, as you said. They also don't necessarily
    > fit all bike models (my s.o.'s Y-frame, for example, is
    > problematic), and I've heard it's a lot harder to lock the
    > bikes down than it is to do so on a roof rack.

    I have both roof and rear racks.

    I love the rear rack. I got it for $12 at a yard sale. I can
    have it on the car, bikes loaded and bungeed in about 3
    minutes, with no climbing and lifting. For close to town
    rides, I think it's the answer.

    Now, If I know I'm going to need to lock them, or I'm
    driving more thant 10 miles, I deal with the roof rack.

    Another advantage of a rear rack is that you can pull
    into the garage without worrying about tearing the rack
    off the car.

    Penny
     
  10. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "Monique Y. Herman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So, I got this new WRX wagon a couple of weeks ago. I have
    > a good idea of what I want to do, but not how to do it.
    > Yakima's website has a cool selection tool, but I want to
    > make sure I buy exactly what I need and no more -- these
    > parts are expensive!
    >

    > monique
    >

    If you're stuck on the Steelhead, get it, but I have to
    vouch for the Raptor. Fits every downtube ever, and you
    can leave the front wheel on...better for interior
    cleanliness, and I just have a thing about fork mounts
    (even though riding forces are the same on dropouts, I
    just don't like it).

    And, Penny was right: head to a store and look through the
    Yakima fit guide, or, even better, talk to an experienced
    salesdude/dudette. They always offer some advice/experience/clearance-
    priced alternatives that make things work out real smooth.

    So why the WRX? It's lots of fun, but when I went to get
    one, I ended up with an Outback Wagon w/ Audio Package. Same
    price, and it was bigger, which I like, and didn't feel as
    "immature" inside as the WRX did (the extra insurance cost
    of a turbo weighed on me, but not much). Yup, a 23-year-old
    college guy opting out of a WRX. Go figure. Also, I threw
    two Raptors on top the day I got the car. Then I put
    stickers on the Raptor channels. Nice.

    If you end up using the factory crossbars and need the
    plastic adaptors that allow Yakima stuff to mount
    (MightyMounts, I believe) I think I have like 5 or 6
    floating around. Let me know, I'll send 'em to you.

    Chris
     
  11. "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > I love the rear rack. I got it for $12 at a yard sale. I
    > can have it on the car, bikes loaded and bungeed in about
    > 3 minutes, with no climbing and lifting.

    Penny, dear, if you have to "climb" to put a bike on top
    of your car,

    CC
     
  12. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Corvus Corvax ran this through spell check:
    > "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> I love the rear rack. I got it for $12 at a yard sale. I
    >> can have it on the car, bikes loaded and bungeed in about
    >> 3 minutes, with no climbing and lifting.
    >
    > Penny, dear, if you have to "climb" to put a bike on top
    > of your car,

    >
    > CC

    that would be hubby's exploder. I am assuming that when I
    get the bike holder set up on the roof of the Subaru, that
    should be manageable. at least I hope so. ;-)

    Penny
     
  13. Penny S

    Penny S Guest

    Corvus Corvax ran this through spell check:
    > "Penny S" <[email protected]> wrote
    >>
    >> I love the rear rack. I got it for $12 at a yard sale. I
    >> can have it on the car, bikes loaded and bungeed in about
    >> 3 minutes, with no climbing and lifting.
    >
    > Penny, dear, if you have to "climb" to put a bike on top
    > of your car,

    >
    > CC

    penny
     
  14. On 2004-03-14, Chris penned:
    >
    > "Monique Y. Herman" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > message news:[email protected]...
    >> So, I got this new WRX wagon a couple of weeks ago. I
    >> have a good idea of what I want to do, but not how to do
    >> it. Yakima's website has a cool selection tool, but I
    >> want to make sure I buy exactly what I need and no more
    >> -- these parts are expensive!
    >>
    >
    >> monique
    >>
    >
    > If you're stuck on the Steelhead, get it, but I have to
    > vouch for the Raptor. Fits every downtube ever, and you
    > can leave the front wheel on...better for interior
    > cleanliness, and I just have a thing about fork mounts
    > (even though riding forces are the same on dropouts, I
    > just don't like it).

    Doesn't fit Eric's Y-frame =/ Also, I'm wondering about how
    much climbing I'd have to do to lock that thing properly.

    One of the nice things about the Steelhead is that we
    already have two on Eric's car; we could save money by just
    moving them over.

    Your suggestion prompted me to poke through the Yakima
    offerings. I'm trying to figure out what the difference is
    between the Viper and the Steelhead.

    > And, Penny was right: head to a store and look through the
    > Yakima fit guide, or, even better, talk to an experienced
    > salesdude/dudette. They always offer some advice/experience/clearance-
    > priced alternatives that make things work out real smooth.

    Yeah; I just need a find a place I can trust first =)

    > So why the WRX? It's lots of fun, but when I went to get
    > one, I ended up with an Outback Wagon w/ Audio Package.
    > Same price, and it was bigger, which I like, and didn't
    > feel as "immature" inside as the WRX did (the extra
    > insurance cost of a turbo weighed on me, but not much).
    > Yup, a 23-year-old college guy opting out of a WRX. Go
    > figure. Also, I threw two Raptors on top the day I got the
    > car. Then I put stickers on the Raptor channels. Nice.

    Stickers?

    Hrm, why the WRX? A few things. It's super-fun. I've been
    driving small cars for years, so while I definitely wanted
    more room, I didn't want anything that felt big. The WRX
    has a small-car feel to it and is pretty easy to park in
    those tight Boulder spots. And I just plain like the look
    of it better than the outback wagon. It was definitely an
    emotional thing, guided by certain more practical desires
    like trunk space and AWD and the capability of mounting
    roof racks.

    I'm not sure what you mean by the interior of the WRX
    feeling "immature"; can you give me some examples? Maybe
    it's just because my previous cars were a Probe and then a
    Celica convertible. I traded in the fully-optioned
    convertible, so I guess I should be missing something, but
    I'm not. I have tons of headroom and visibility. The audio
    controls are pretty easy. The only thing I'm hating is the
    cupholders -- there's one that gets in the way of the stereo
    and is completely ineffective at keeping my mochas from
    spilling all over when driving over a speed bump; the other
    one is right where my elbow needs to be when I shift.

    Insurance was higher for me, but not ungodly. I also have
    the advantage of the drop you get at 25, and I expect my
    insurance to go down a bit more once I'm married at the end
    of the month.

    > If you end up using the factory crossbars and need the
    > plastic adaptors that allow Yakima stuff to mount
    > (MightyMounts, I believe) I think I have like 5 or 6
    > floating around. Let me know, I'll send 'em to you.

    Well, thank you very much! I'll have to figure it out. I'm
    definitely not buying anything till I see where the county
    taxes and the honeymoon expenses leave me.

    --
    monique
     
  15. On 2004-03-14, Doki penned:
    >
    >
    > Monique Y. Herman wrote:
    >> What's a Ka?
    >
    > A pretty small Ford. 1.3L engine (79 cubic inches :p),
    > weighs less than a tonne and it was the first "new edge"
    > Ford, it's probably still pretty odd looking even though
    > you've got the Focus over there. Look here for a picture:
    > www.zemancar.cz/images/ford-ka.jpg.

    Cute! I don't think it's odd looking. It looks nice.

    >> Sure, there's room in the trunk, but I'd rather not run
    >> the risk of getting bike grease ground into a brand-new
    >> interior, and I also am not sure about how to stack bikes
    >> such that the pedals, gears, chain, etc don't interact in
    >> possibly unfortunate ways.
    >
    > If you can, get hold of a load box for the back, which
    > will stop you ruining the carpets etc.

    I have that, but it doesn't help the backs of the seats,
    which need to be folded down to make room for the bike. I am
    planning on acquiring a tarp, though.

    > Fair enough. If you're driving a couple of hundred miles
    > you'll save a worthwhile amount of petrol or raise your
    > top speed by 20 or 30mph. I'd go for the extra speed ;).

    I don't need to be *anywhere* near this car's top speed.
    Also, while I do care about fuel efficiency to some extent,
    I'm under the impression that gas prices are much cheaper
    here than in Europe. I'm paying under $2 for a gallon of
    premium gas.

    --
    monique
     
  16. Doki

    Doki Guest

    Monique Y. Herman wrote:
    > On 2004-03-14, Doki penned:
    >>
    >>
    >> Monique Y. Herman wrote:
    >>> What's a Ka?
    >>
    >> A pretty small Ford. 1.3L engine (79 cubic inches :p),
    >> weighs less than a tonne and it was the first "new edge"
    >> Ford, it's probably still pretty odd looking even though
    >> you've got the Focus over there. Look here for a picture:
    >> www.zemancar.cz/images/ford-ka.jpg.
    >
    > Cute! I don't think it's odd looking. It looks nice.

    So do, fortuneately. They looked very odd when they first
    started making them in 96 though :).

    >> Fair enough. If you're driving a couple of hundred miles
    >> you'll save a worthwhile amount of petrol or raise your
    >> top speed by 20 or 30mph. I'd go for the extra speed ;).
    >
    > I don't need to be *anywhere* near this car's top speed.

    I'd certainly enjoy going places at the car's top speed,
    even if I didn't need to ;). They do 150 or so don't they?

    > Also, while I do care about fuel efficiency to some
    > extent, I'm under the impression that gas prices are much
    > cheaper here than in Europe. I'm paying under $2 for a
    > gallon of premium gas.

    I'm paying something like $1 a litre, 4.4 litres to an
    imperial gallon. I think US gallons are different. It won't
    make much difference if you're driving around town, but if
    you're driving at 60mph upwards it'll hit it a lot more. Not
    got any figures but I imagine you'd be able to look them up
    if you're bothered.
     
  17. On Sat, 13 Mar 2004 21:27:40 -0000, "Doki" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Why not just take the wheels off and chuck the bikes in the
    >boot (trunk)? Bike racks do very bad things to your cars
    >aerodynamics,

    That is really dependent upon the aerodynamics of the
    vehicle.

    Roof racks don't have to have that great an impact, let
    alone do "very bad things" to a vehicle's aerodynamics.
     
  18. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 10:58:25 -0700, Monique Y. Herman wrote:

    > I don't need to be *anywhere* near this car's top speed.
    > Also, while I do care about fuel efficiency to some
    > extent, I'm under the impression that gas prices are much
    > cheaper here than in Europe. I'm paying under $2 for a
    > gallon of premium gas.

    Another thing we get ripped off on...

    Taking UK petrol price at 80p/l (low average), that equates
    to about $6 per gallon. Even in Luxembourg, which has the
    cheapest petrol prices in Western Europe, we still pay $4
    per gallon.
     
  19. On 2004-03-15, bomba penned:
    > On Mon, 15 Mar 2004 10:58:25 -0700, Monique Y.
    > Herman wrote:
    >
    >> I don't need to be *anywhere* near this car's top speed.
    >> Also, while I do care about fuel efficiency to some
    >> extent, I'm under the impression that gas prices are much
    >> cheaper here than in Europe. I'm paying under $2 for a
    >> gallon of premium gas.
    >
    > Another thing we get ripped off on...
    >
    > Taking UK petrol price at 80p/l (low average), that
    > equates to about $6 per gallon. Even in Luxembourg, which
    > has the cheapest petrol prices in Western Europe, we still
    > pay $4 per gallon.

    I just filled up. It was like $1.88 for premium gas. If
    I'd gone for the regular gas it would've been more like
    $1.60, I think.

    --
    monique
     
  20. S O R N I

    S O R N I Guest

    Monique Y. Herman wrote:

    > I just filled up. It was like $1.88 for premium gas. If
    > I'd gone for the regular gas it would've been more like
    > $1.60, I think.

    On behalf of Southern Californians, BITE US! (San Diego is
    over $2.10 for Regular.)

    Bill "of course, it IS sunny and 63 out" S.
     
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