Looking to graduate from my Trek 7100

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by JackOrlFL, Jul 30, 2009.

  1. JackOrlFL

    JackOrlFL New Member

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    Hey all.. I'm thinking of upgrading from my Trek 7100 that I've been riding for 4 years now. I'm a fairly big/tall guy 6'4" 250lbs, so I need a bike that will support my frame and get a nice ride/workout with. My hybrid is nice so not sure if I want to stay with a hybrid or not. I'd like a little lighter, but need the sturdy frame thing. I've been looking at a Cannondale Adventure 5, or perhaps a Specialized. Not sure I want a comfort bike, would that be slower/heavier than a hybrid? Any feedback on what brand/type that would be a good fit. Another thing, I keep hearing that Trek's aren't that great, hearing negative press on them, not sure if it is a sales pitch or not. Thanks for reading and any feedback. :cool:
     
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  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

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    Your trek 7100 is a comfort bike so I don't understand why you might want another comfort bike.

    Hybrid is a general class that includes all bikes that aren't cruisers, road bikes, or mountain bikes. That includes comfort bikes, fitness bikes, urban hipster bikes, the whole spectrum. Generally I call anything that has derailleur shifting and flat handlebars and is not a mountain bike a hybrid.

    Now that we have that settled you have to decide what kind of riding you're going to do. If it's mainly on pavement then you have to decide how deep you want to go--fitness bike (Trek FX or Specialized Sirrus, for example) or full bore road bike. If dirt is a significant part of your riding, then you should look at dirt-oriented hybrids (Specialized Crosstrail, for example).

    Now here's my scoop on fitness bikes. We've been selling Trek FXs, throughout the spectrum, like hotcakes for two seasons. The entire range is wonderfully designed and marketed and we have never had a technical or sales problems with the bike. You determine that you want a fitness bike and choose your price and performance level, simple as that.

    We'd been a little less successful with the Specialized Sirrus line. There was nothing wrong with the bikes, but it was harder, either because of Specialized's marketing or our store's buying, to match the bike to the rider. Now we have received and built up some standard 2010 Sirruses and Vitas, and I have to say they're just beautiful. They're equipped like the 7.2FX but the frames are a bit lighter and prettier, like a 7.3 with curves.

    You can probably guess I'm pretty enthusiastic for fitness bikes. This is true. I think most mountain bikes are never ridden off pavement, and many riders would love a bike they can get into without a lot of commitment and still grow with.
     
  3. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

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    I presume your bike's fork has a 1 1/8" steerer (the norm, now) ...

    If you like your bike, but simply want to make it a little lighter & a little more nimble, then you should consider swapping the suspension fork which I presume your bike has for a 'solid' fork -- a threadless TANDEM fork, specifically.

    Presuming your bike uses 700c wheels, then the least expensive option will be a TANDEM fork that you get off of eBay. A steel tandem fork will probably be a "pull" from a new bike whose owner wanted a lighter (e.g., carbon fiber) fork ... there will be very low demand for a steel tandem fork whereas OTHER forks with cantilever bosses (on which you will mount your V-brakes) will probably be in higher demand (i.e., cost more) -- figure somewhere between $20-to-$50, probably closer to $20 before shipping costs, but it's a catch-as-catch-can situation.

    You should be able to get the "used" threadless fork + new threadless headset + new threadless stem for well under $100.

    Installation skill level is LOW ... info is on the web if you need help.

    OTHER components will be easier to change if you ever get the urge.

    BTW. I honestly do not know why any reputable bike shop sells a non-MTB with a suspension fork ... shops should instruct the potential buyers that a suspension fork on a non-MTB is mostly dead weight & an unnecessary expense.
     
  4. JackOrlFL

    JackOrlFL New Member

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    Great info, looks like I'm focusing on the Trek FX at this point. Appreciate the tips and classifications. Definitely want to step from comfort to fitness. Sounds like a logical progression. Next step....test ride.
     
  5. TinyCycler

    TinyCycler New Member

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    Great to know this about suspension forks on non-MTBs. You just saved me $200 for the 2 step up model! Thanks.:)
     
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