Looking to purchase first road bike



maddogbubba

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Jul 5, 2010
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it is obvious the bikes offered at the 1000.00 range are mixing and matching the components to keep the price down -CAAD 8 with Fsa cranks , tektro brakes , 105 brake levers , etc . this is just my opinion ,but I would try to keep the mixing and matching to a minimum . ( i.e ) Felt Z85 - all 105 except for the cranks / chain rings (and close to the same price range ) .while at your LBS , you can say something like - I would be going for that CAAD 8 , but that component grouping is a holding me back , make that bike complete 105 for a couple hundred bucks and you got your self a deal .after all they will find use for the other stuff , besides - if you purchased from them , you probably would be buying other items also . nothing wrong with grouping things together to make the deal good for the both of you .and their getting a new customer .

Just a thought.
 

Tim05

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Dec 28, 2010
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Hey Bubba,

That sounds like a really good idea that I'd be interested in. Honestly, I am very uneducated about components of bikes, so I may have to do some research. Are 105 set components much better then what is on the stock CAAD8?

Thanks again for all the great advice.

Edit: Also, I've been looking at the Trek 1 series. I like the 1.2 and the 1.5. Both are aesthetically pleasing to me, and it appears that they try to at least use common component sets - for better or worse, I'm not sure. But the price range fits.

Sorry for all the edits... I did some quick research about components and think I understand what you mean by 105 component sets. I'll just have to head to the LBS and talk to them about how much it would cost to replace the stock components with 105 ones. Thanks again for the help man, I feel a world more educated.
 

davereo

Well-Known Member
Jun 17, 2010
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The 2011 CAAD 8 5 has 105 components everything except the brake calipers and crank. Dont kid yourself into believing that you can walk into a bike shop and start telling them you dont like the component group on a bike and want them to work in some better components when they already have one on the floor with them. You will end up paying more money than just moving up to the next model. If you dont like the Corolla when at Toyota your best option is to move on to the Camry.
 

maddogbubba

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Jul 5, 2010
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Originally Posted by davereo .

The 2011 CAAD 8 5 has 105 components everything except the brake calipers and crank. Dont kid yourself into believing that you can walk into a bike shop and start telling them you dont like the component group on a bike and want them to work in some better components when they already have one on the floor with them. You will end up paying more money than just moving up to the next model. If you dont like the Corolla when at Toyota your best option is to move on to the Camry.
the first road bike that I purchased , I had them change out a few different items , because I wanted higher quality parts (handlebars , saddle ) . Guess what - they absolutely did it ! Not only did they come way down on their price , they also changed those parts for ZERO DOLLARS . Now I understand that there is not as much play in this price range but it does not hurt to ask . Some bike shops wont flex and some will .Expect to pay for the changes . if they want to charge you full retail than they should give you credit on the parts you want changed at full retail . It has been done. If it makes sense to go into the camry at a certain point than do so , but if you can get what you want for less why would'nt you .
 

davereo

Well-Known Member
Jun 17, 2010
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Originally Posted by maddogbubba .



Quote: Originally Posted by davereo .

The 2011 CAAD 8 5 has 105 components everything except the brake calipers and crank. Dont kid yourself into believing that you can walk into a bike shop and start telling them you dont like the component group on a bike and want them to work in some better components when they already have one on the floor with them. You will end up paying more money than just moving up to the next model. If you dont like the Corolla when at Toyota your best option is to move on to the Camry.
the first road bike that I purchased , I had them change out a few different items , because I wanted higher quality parts (handlebars , saddle ) . Guess what - they absolutely did it ! Not only did they come way down on their price , they also changed those parts for ZERO DOLLARS . Now I understand that there is not as much play in this price range but it does not hurt to ask . Some bike shops wont flex and some will .Expect to pay for the changes . if they want to charge you full retail than they should give you credit on the parts you want changed at full retail . It has been done. If it makes sense to go into the camry at a certain point than do so , but if you can get what you want for less why would'nt you .



Look at it this way. The Caad 8 comes in three or four model levels. Look at the bike that is outfitted with the components you are interested in then make your offer. It would just make more sense to move up to the level of bike with the components you are interested in and get the benifits of the better components and wheels ect... Things like better handlebars and saddle are rider specific and are changed out quite often for comfort. IMO I feel the bike shop would rather haggle the price of a 1200 bike down to 1100 than rework an 800 dollar bike for less Margin. We all measure value differently. Hey you never know you could walk out of there with a much better bike than you thought it does not hurt to ask and it is just another way of working a deal.
 

maddogbubba

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Jul 5, 2010
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Originally Posted by davereo .










. Hey you never know you could walk out of there with a much better bike than you thought it does not hurt to ask and it is just another way of working a deal.
Tim - davereo makes some good points .Nothing wrong with working them over a little , their probably use to it . if the next level of bike is stretching your budget to far , than it's time to do your homework -In the end, this is about getting a bike that you will be satisfied with .Going back to some pricing that you referred to on earlier posts, here is some homework (partially chewed up by the dog ) .

CAAD 8 800.00
105 brakes and crankset upgrade 410.00 approx
Total 1210.00
FSA crankset and tektro brakes
credit due 325.00 approx
Total 885.00
labor 100.00 approx

Grand Total 995.00

Tim - even if you spent another 100.00 $ on top of this , I think you would be paying less than if you went up to the next level caad series . checked out the trek 1.2 and 1.5 -like the caad 8 more . to each is own .
 

Tim05

New Member
Dec 28, 2010
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Hey again guys. Thanks for all the great advice. Next week I'm planning on going out to the LBS to test out a Cannondale CAAD8 5 series. Here is a link to what I am leaning towards http://kozy.com/product/11-cannondale-caad8-5-triple-73850-1.htm

What do you think? Is it a good buy for my first road bike? Also, this bike comes in the normal frame style as well as a compact style. From some meager research online it doesn't seem like this makes a whole lot of a difference. The store carries the compact frames in store, but can order the traditional size frames with delivery in 1-2 weeks. But, if I have them order a traditional frame and don't like it, there is a 10% restocking fee if I don't purchase it. What I'm getting at is if I test ride the compact frame and don't feel comfortable on it, are the odds that I'm not going to feel comfortable on a compact frame either? Just FYI, not sure if it makes a difference in this decision, I'm a bigger guys - around 6'1 and 220 pounds.
 

Motobecane

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Nov 5, 2010
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I don't think there are 2 different frames, I think in this case "compact" refers to the crank. A compact crank is a double crank generally with a large ring of 50 teeth and a small ring of 34 as opposed to a triple crank which is usually 30/39/52 or 30/42/52. If you are close to 50 years old and 6'1" 220 lbs either is a good choice. A compact crank is usually mated with a larger casette on the back so that you get the same range of gears as a triple. I recently put an ultegra compact crank on my road bike and I don't like it as much as my old triple because I'm 240 lbs and I used to easily ride mostly in th emiddle ring, now i have to do a lot more shifting up front, kind of a pain in the ass
 

Tim05

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Dec 28, 2010
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Oh, thanks a lot for the info Moto! I'm not yet close to 50 yet, only 23 /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif So the only real difference is the amount of gears you will have to shift from ring to ring? I guess I can't see how that would matter much to me and make me want to order the triple crank instead of just buying a compact from the floor. A minor annoyance, but I have never been one to shift gears very frequently during a ride.
 

Johnp234

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Jan 2, 2011
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I can't stand people who respond to legitimate questions with arrogant bragging about themselves, can you?

I'm 62, and I average 22.7mph, so you are a waste of my time, but I'm wasting it telling you, nyah nyah, nyah. What a douche!
 

Tim05

New Member
Dec 28, 2010
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Originally Posted by Johnp234 .

I can't stand people who respond to legitimate questions with arrogant bragging about themselves, can you?

I'm 62, and I average 22.7mph, so you are a waste of my time, but I'm wasting it telling you, nyah nyah, nyah. What a douche!

I'm not sure who you are reffering to here John? Is this directed at me? I'm not bragging about being young, I thought he was asking my age because he mentioned if I was close to 50 when referencing my height and weight. If you thought I was bragging about something I honestly was not - I didn't even know the difference between compact and triple cranks!
 

maydog

Well-Known Member
Feb 5, 2010
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You don't really need a new bike to do longer rides. Plenty of folks have done centuries on hybrids or even mountain bikes. I have done a few charity rides with hybrids in the group.Try a set of high pressure slick tires on your hybrid, that may be all the boost in speed you need.

I have found some good deal on used rides on craigslist, you may want to check that out.

Otherwise, all the major brand entry level bikes are fine machines and will give plenty of good service. Lower price does not necessarily mean lower durability or reliability, I have put over 10,000 miles on a Sora equipped "entry level" bike. The biggest weakness of entry level may be the wheels, but a good shop will ensure that any issues with the components, such spoke breakage, are addressed.
 

gman0482

Member
Aug 13, 2009
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Originally Posted by Johnp234 .

I can't stand people who respond to legitimate questions with arrogant bragging about themselves, can you?

I'm 62, and I average 22.7mph, so you are a waste of my time, but I'm wasting it telling you, nyah nyah, nyah. What a douche!

Relax buddy, no need to get all hot and bothered, the kid was just following up to a post.

Tim, in regards to your questions, test riding is your best option. Cycling is such a personal sport, that the best answers are usually found by trying things out. Only you yourself can know what you want out of a bike.

Good luck,
-Greg
 

guy231

New Member
Feb 10, 2011
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Funny how text get mis understood by some people, I did not find anything Tim said wrong, just sharing his opinion and experience.

I agree with gman, try out a few setups and take it from there.
 

wotnoshoeseh

New Member
Jan 15, 2011
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Tim,
If price is an issue you should look at the 2010 models if you can still find any. I was looking at a 2010 CAAD 9 yesterday with Tiagra drivetrain and shifters (although Tektro brakes), and it was $900.
Seemed to be a decent bike and I had a quick test ride.

Good bike, good price in my opinion.
 

Johnp234

New Member
Jan 2, 2011
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I'm not commenting on your post. It's a perfectly reasonable question. I'm commenting on the following reply:

KDELONG: "I'm not gonna dump on you because you are sorta new to this forum, but speed on a bike is not really a function of weight of the bike. It is a function of the rider. ( will concede that the design of the bike does make a difference, ex. a road bike versus a MTB). A bike does not go fast by itself, it just sits there. A reasonably light bike is not going to make an unfit rider faster, and a reasonably comparatively designed heavier bike is not going make a fit rider much slower. Its all about the engine, aka rider. And, for what its worth, at 52 I still average 22.7 mph on my old 1996 chrome-moly Centurion so a person can still ride fast on a steel bike. And when I ride the bike trails, I pass a lot CF bikes ridden by younger weekend warriors who either don't have the time or desire to train and improve their speed. All it takes is a little work and you can ride "fast".

This is a jerk with nothing to contribute to the discussion except his desire to brag about how he's so much better than you. I HATE people like this!
 

coneofsilence

Member
Jul 26, 2006
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Originally Posted by Johnp234 .

I'm not commenting on your post. It's a perfectly reasonable question. I'm commenting on the following reply:

KDELONG: "I'm not gonna dump on you because you are sorta new to this forum, but speed on a bike is not really a function of weight of the bike. It is a function of the rider. ( will concede that the design of the bike does make a difference, ex. a road bike versus a MTB). A bike does not go fast by itself, it just sits there. A reasonably light bike is not going to make an unfit rider faster, and a reasonably comparatively designed heavier bike is not going make a fit rider much slower. Its all about the engine, aka rider. And, for what its worth, at 52 I still average 22.7 mph on my old 1996 chrome-moly Centurion so a person can still ride fast on a steel bike. And when I ride the bike trails, I pass a lot CF bikes ridden by younger weekend warriors who either don't have the time or desire to train and improve their speed. All it takes is a little work and you can ride "fast".

This is a jerk with nothing to contribute to the discussion except his desire to brag about how he's so much better than you. I HATE people like this!


And you sir can't handle the truth. I agree with everything that Kdelong wrote. I am in my mid 20s and have been passed by guys nearer to death on there old mountain bikes.
 

Lewie

New Member
Sep 27, 2010
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IMHO, the weight of the bike, the cost of the bike, the frame material, how fast you can ride, how far you can ride -- they all mean very little. What matters is how much fun you are having. As I said, just my humble opinion.

Lew
 
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Motobecane

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Nov 5, 2010
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Originally Posted by Tim05 .

Oh, thanks a lot for the info Moto! I'm not yet close to 50 yet, only 23 /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif So the only real difference is the amount of gears you will have to shift from ring to ring? I guess I can't see how that would matter much to me and make me want to order the triple crank instead of just buying a compact from the floor. A minor annoyance, but I have never been one to shift gears very frequently during a ride.
sorry, I guess it was another person in the thread that said he was close to 50.

In my opinion, anyone that can't afford to spend more than $1000 on a bike owes it to themselves to consider a bikes direct bike. I have one (as you can tell by my screen name) and it's great. I actually only bought the frame from someone and built the rest up myself but I can honestly say that there is nothing about my frame that makes it any worse than anyother aluminum framed road bike. You can get full ULTEGRA bikes from bikes direct for $1000. Go to your lbs and your lucky to get a 105/Tiagra mixed bike for that price point
 

Motobecane

New Member
Nov 5, 2010
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Originally Posted by maydog .

You don't really need a new bike to do longer rides. Plenty of folks have done centuries on hybrids or even mountain bikes. I have done a few charity rides with hybrids in the group.Try a set of high pressure slick tires on your hybrid, that may be all the boost in speed you need.

I have found some good deal on used rides on craigslist, you may want to check that out.

Otherwise, all the major brand entry level bikes are fine machines and will give plenty of good service. Lower price does not necessarily mean lower durability or reliability, I have put over 10,000 miles on a Sora equipped "entry level" bike. The biggest weakness of entry level may be the wheels, but a good shop will ensure that any issues with the components, such spoke breakage, are addressed.
I don't know if the OP is even around anymore but I agree with this. If you currently have a "hybrid" your going to get very minimal gain from buying a new road bike in the $800 range. Depending on the makeup of your hybrid it could be worth upgrading. I used to have a giant rapid 3 which is a flat bar road bike aka hybrid. I put drop bars and brifters on it. If I had swapped out the chromoly fork for a carbon fork I essentially would have turned it into a Giant Defy3 but instead of paying $800 for a new Defy, I would have paid $400 for shifters, new front derailer and the new fork.

I'm still a cycling newbie and I love to tinker but I"ve definately learned over the past year that the bike is only as fast as the rider. I've done a metric century, an 80 miler and a 112 miler in the span of about 2 months last year and I can say that going with a drop bar bike is a good option because if the wind starts blowing, it's nice to be able to just stick your head down and mash.