Looking to purchse 1st set of shoes and pedals...

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by ccrnnr9, Aug 28, 2005.

  1. ccrnnr9

    ccrnnr9 New Member

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    Like the title says, I am looking to purchase my first set of shoes and pedals for my newly acquired Masi Alare (which I absolutely love by the way!). I have put about 85 miles on the bike in the 5 days I have had it and I can already say that I really want a pair of road shoes and pedals. The thing is that Im pretty lost as to what to look for. I get a little confused by all the different compatibilities. I was wondering if anyone could give me some advice on a good pair of fairly cheap pedals (good quality but not high price) and a pair of road shoes to match. I have tried on quite a few pair of different shoes (mainly adidas and specialized) and I wear a 43 in all of them. I have heard people say its fine to go with MTB pedals while others say they can cause hot spots on long rides. I would prefer to get whatever will work, but if road pedals truly are better, than I would prefer those. I don't have a set budget but I would like to keep it under 160$ if at all possible (I will be buying online...if you can suggest a good website that would be helpful as well). Thanks guys!
    ~Nick
     
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  2. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I own a pair of Pearl Izumi Vortex shows that I've put about 14k miles on. They are still in great shape and they offer a nice combination of comfort, breathability and performance (and at $100 they didn't break the bank). I use them with Speedplay X2's which also perform well and they offer a nice float (the ability to rotate your foot while locked in to the pedal). Hot spots can be caused by a poor position of the cleat or a sole that is too soft. You need to experiment a bit to find the most comfortable place for the cleat. The general rule, is the pedal spindle should align with the ball of your foot. Good luck!:)
     
  3. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    One note. Euro sizes can vary a bit from brand to brand. My 44 Pearl's are considerably more roomy than a pair of 44 Diadora's. If you order on line, try to try them first, or be prepared to exchange.
     
  4. mattjf

    mattjf New Member

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    My first pedal was the Speedplay X/3's a couple years ago. I also used the Performance Forte road shoe. I had to give up riding for a while, but now I am back into it. I decided to go with the Speedplay Zero's for pedals and Shimano shoes. I would stay away from the Forte road shoe. It was pretty cheap and uncomfortable, at least for me.

    People seem to either love or hate the Speedplay pedals. You can get the Chrome-moly for less than $150. It's a great pedal.

    -Matt
     
  5. lumpy

    lumpy New Member

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    Fit is everything! Find a store with a big selection and try 'em all on in the afternoon when your feet are their full size. I'd only buy online if I was replacing shoes that I knew already fit well.

    I prefer mtn. type shoes and SPD style pedals because they're easier to walk around in. I have Pear Izumis.
     
  6. John M

    John M New Member

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    I love speedplays and have them on my 2 road bikes. I use SPDs on my commuter and mountain bike. I must say that around town and with the frequent stops at lights/stop signs on my commute, that the MTB shoe/pedal is much more convenient and walkable than the road shoe.

    Hot spots are eliminated by proper mounting of the cleat and and appropriate fitting, stiff soled shoe.

    Road shoes/pedals are lighter, MTB more convenient. Choose based on your needs. For a beginner, I would suggest going with MTB style.
     
  7. bbattle

    bbattle New Member

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    I've got Pearl Izumi Vagabond's for both my mountain and road bikes. I use Ultegra pedals, large platform. Pretty easy to clip but the pedal wants to be upside down so I have to nudge it over before clipping in. This can be a pain in town with frequent stops.

    The mountain bike shoes are definitely easier to walk in and I've never accidentally unclipped while on the trails. You could consider going this route on your road bike.

    My LBS said for my weight (<160lb.) I didn't need a carbon soled road shoe.
     
  8. Powerful Pete

    Powerful Pete New Member

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    The best road shoes, unless you have very particular issues, are Sidis. That is it. Check out the Sidi shoes that fit your price range, buy them, and ride happily and in great comfort for years. That simple.

    Remember that Sidi shoes run small. I wear a 44 and have to purchase a 45.

    And if you want to avoid the hype, get a pair of Campagnolo pro-fit pedals, and you will ride efficiently, in comfort, with ultimate reliability and style. Fortunately, for some reason Campagnolo pedals are not considered ' cool ' when they are amongst the best pedals around. Try Chorus Pro-Fits for best all round bang for the buck.

    The Sidi Campagnolo combo may cost a bit more, but you will find yourself 'transplanting' them to your next bike...

    Happy shopping and riding!
     
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