Low-carb eating & triglycerides

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Chad C., May 7, 2004.

  1. Chad C.

    Chad C. Guest

    Does the substantial reduction in trigylcerides in the blood
    from following a low-carb eating plan (about 50% fat
    calories, 25% protein calories, 25% low-glycemic
    carbohydrate calories) result in a decreased long-term risk
    for heart disease? Blood lipid tests pretty clearly show
    triglycerides reducing by about half on average for most
    people. I want to know the implications of this over the
    long haul.

    Thanks!

    -Chad
     
    Tags:


  2. "Chad C." wrote:

    > Does the substantial reduction in trigylcerides in the
    > blood from following a low-carb eating plan (about 50% fat
    > calories, 25% protein calories, 25% low-glycemic
    > carbohydrate calories) result in a decreased long-term
    > risk for heart disease?

    Ime, no.

    > Blood lipid tests pretty clearly show triglycerides
    > reducing by about half on average for most people. I want
    > to know the implications of this over the long haul.
    >

    Ime, heart disease worsens in folks trying to lose weight
    with the low-carb approach.

    >
    > Thanks!
    >

    You are welcome, Chad :)

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z11841938

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  3. Susan

    Susan Guest

    x-no-archive: yes

    >Does the substantial reduction in trigylcerides in the
    >blood from following a low-carb eating plan (about 50% fat
    >calories, 25% protein calories, 25% low-glycemic
    >carbohydrate calories) result in a decreased long-term risk
    >for heart disease? Blood lipid tests pretty clearly show
    >triglycerides reducing by about half on average for most
    >people. I want to know the implications of this over the
    >long haul.
    >
    >Thanks!
    >
    >-Chad

    Triglycerides are an independent risk factor, some
    researchers believe TGL to be a more accurate
    predictor of CVD:

    "A new study suggests that level of triglyceride in the
    blood may help predict heart attack risk as well as other
    more well-known blood fats such as LDL and HDL
    cholesterol. High triglycerides alone increased the risk
    of heart attack nearly three-fold, according to a report
    in the current issue of Circulation. And people with the
    highest ratio of triglycerides to HDL -- the "good"
    cholesterol -- had 16 times the risk of heart attack as
    those with the lowest ratio of triglycerides to HDL in the
    study of 340 heart attack patients and 340 of their
    healthy, same age counterparts. The ratio of triglycerides
    to HDL was the strongest predictor of a heart attack, even
    more accurate than the
    LDL/HDL ratio," reported Harvard lead study author.
    Triglycerides, a mixture of fatty acids and
    glycerol that make up the principle fats in the
    blood, bind to carrier proteins, forming compounds
    known as lipoproteins. Other types of lipoproteins
    that carry cholesterol, such as LDL and HDL, are
    known to be related to the risk of heart disease
    because of their propensity to deposit -- or not
    deposit -- fat in coronary arteries. However, it
    has not been clear if triglyceride level could
    predict heart attack risk, despite years of
    research." Circulation (1997;96:2520-2525)

    Susan
     
  4. Chad C.

    Chad C. Guest

    Hi Andrew,

    Could you please elucidate your reasoning?

    Thanks!

    -Chad

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote
    in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Chad C." wrote:
    >
    > > Does the substantial reduction in trigylcerides in the
    > > blood from
    following
    > > a low-carb eating plan (about 50% fat calories, 25%
    > > protein calories,
    25%
    > > low-glycemic carbohydrate calories) result in a
    > > decreased long-term risk
    for
    > > heart disease?
    >
    > Ime, no.
    >
    > > Blood lipid tests pretty clearly show triglycerides
    > > reducing by about half on average for most people. I
    > > want to know the
    implications of
    > > this over the long haul.
    > >
    >
    > Ime, heart disease worsens in folks trying to lose weight
    > with the
    low-carb
    > approach.
    >
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    >
    > You are welcome, Chad :)
    >
    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/
    >
    > ** Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557
    >
    > What is all this about?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z11841938
    >
    > Is this spam? http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  5. "Chad C." wrote:

    > Hi Andrew,
    >
    > Could you please elucidate your reasoning?
    >

    One possible explanation for what I have observed is what
    happens at a molecular level when someone has hyperketonemia
    from being carb deficient.

    This has been discussed before here at SMC and should be
    archived in Google.

    Google keywords:

    hyperketonemia, Barry Sears, Atkins

    >
    > Thanks!
    >

    You are welcome, Chad :)

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z11841938

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  6. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD wrote:

    > "Chad C." wrote:
    >
    >> Hi Andrew,
    >>
    >> Could you please elucidate your reasoning?
    >>
    > One possible explanation for what I have observed is what
    > happens at a molecular level when someone has
    > hyperketonemia from being carb deficient.
    >
    > This has been discussed before here at SMC and should be
    > archived in Google.

    This has been discussed, but almost always with the premise
    of hyperketonemia as the permanent condition. Reduced carbs
    doesn't necessarily cause any sorts of ketotic conditions;
    it varies from person to person.

    Go over to alt.support.diet.low-carb and ask the same
    question. Lots of people with very specific information
    about it; lots of experience. The FAQ is posted every day
    and has lots of good leads to investigate.

    Bob

    > Google keywords:
    >
    > hyperketonemia, Barry Sears, Atkins
     
  7. Mirek Fidler

    Mirek Fidler Guest

    Well, what about this explanation:

    High TG and low HDL indicates insulin resistance. The most
    obvious symptom of insulin resistance is of course highly
    increased insulin levels in blood and unstable blood sugar.
    Both are highly atherogenic.

    So maybe TG/HDL ration is nothing else than indicator of
    insulin resistance. As TG and HDL are related with general
    dislipidemia and high TC as well, it would simply explain
    most results of Farmingham stdies, failed results of non-
    statin TC reduction drugs, failed results of low-fat mania
    etc, etc...

    In this context low-carb would indeed be benefical, as it
    should improve both BG stability and reduce insulin
    secretion - and this would be demonstrated in improved TG
    and HDL levels.

    As for dr. Chung's (and Barry Sear's) concerns about lipid
    peroxidation due to ketonemia, well, in very deep ketosis or
    ketoacidosis it really might happen. In any case it is
    better to stay away from deep ketosis and to suplement with
    E vitamin to prevent peroxidation.

    Speaking about it, many consider The Zone to be the low-carb
    plan. South-Beach promotes itself as non-ketogenic from the
    day one. Atkins is ketogenic, but when followed as written
    it should lead you on the "edge" of ketosis (around 50g
    carbs a day). That is as ketogenic as fasting for 24 hours.

    Mirek

    "Susan " <[email protected]> pí¹e v diskusním pøíspìvku
    news:[email protected]...
    > x-no-archive: yes
    >
    > >Does the substantial reduction in trigylcerides in the
    > >blood from
    following
    > >a low-carb eating plan (about 50% fat calories, 25%
    > >protein calories,
    25%
    > >low-glycemic carbohydrate calories) result in a decreased
    > >long-term
    risk for
    > >heart disease? Blood lipid tests pretty clearly show
    > >triglycerides
    reducing
    > >by about half on average for most people. I want to
    > >know the
    implications of
    > >this over the long haul.
    > >
    > >Thanks!
    > >
    > >-Chad
    >
    > Triglycerides are an independent risk factor, some
    > researchers believe
    TGL to
    > be a more accurate predictor of CVD:
    >
    > "A new study suggests that level of triglyceride in the
    > blood may help predict heart attack risk as well as other
    > more well-known blood fats such as LDL and HDL
    > cholesterol. High triglycerides alone increased the risk
    > of heart attack nearly three-fold, according to a report
    > in the current issue of Circulation. And people with the
    > highest ratio of triglycerides to HDL -- the "good"
    > cholesterol -- had 16 times the risk of heart attack as
    > those with the lowest ratio of triglycerides to HDL in the
    > study of 340 heart attack patients and 340 of their
    > healthy, same age counterparts. The ratio of triglycerides
    > to HDL was the strongest predictor of a heart attack, even
    > more accurate than the
    > LDL/HDL ratio," reported Harvard lead study author.
    > Triglycerides, a mixture of fatty acids and glycerol
    > that make up the principle fats in the blood, bind to
    > carrier proteins, forming compounds known as
    > lipoproteins. Other types of lipoproteins that carry
    > cholesterol, such as LDL and HDL, are known to be
    > related to the risk of heart disease because of their
    > propensity to deposit -- or not deposit -- fat in
    > coronary arteries. However, it has not been clear if
    > triglyceride level could predict heart attack risk,
    > despite years of research." Circulation (1997;96:2520-
    > 2525)
    >
    > Susan
     
  8. Fresh~Horses

    Fresh~Horses Guest

    "Mirek Fidler" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Well, what about this explanation:
    >
    > High TG and low HDL indicates insulin resistance. The most
    > obvious symptom of insulin resistance is of course highly
    > increased insulin levels in blood and unstable blood
    > sugar. Both are highly atherogenic.
    >
    > So maybe TG/HDL ration is nothing else than indicator of
    > insulin resistance. As TG and HDL are related with general
    > dislipidemia and high TC as well, it would simply explain
    > most results of Farmingham stdies, failed results of non-
    > statin TC reduction drugs, failed results of low-fat mania
    > etc, etc...
    >
    > In this context low-carb would indeed be benefical, as it
    > should improve both BG stability and reduce insulin
    > secretion - and this would be demonstrated in improved TG
    > and HDL levels.
    >
    > As for dr. Chung's (and Barry Sear's) concerns about lipid
    > peroxidation due to ketonemia, well, in very deep ketosis
    > or ketoacidosis it really might happen. In any case it is
    > better to stay away from deep ketosis and to suplement
    > with E vitamin to prevent peroxidation.
    >
    > Speaking about it, many consider The Zone to be the low-
    > carb plan. South-Beach promotes itself as non-ketogenic
    > from the day one. Atkins is ketogenic, but when followed
    > as written it should lead you on the "edge" of ketosis
    > (around 50g carbs a day). That is as ketogenic as fasting
    > for 24 hours.
    >
    > Mirek

    Salut Mirek

    I invite you to comment on my posts (elsewhere) in this
    thread regarding my cholesterol levels. I won't repeat the
    information here. Jim Chinnis has found something very
    interesting relative to my experience of the past several
    months. And, some of the links Al Lohse has posted have some
    relation to what Jim has found.

    Zee
     
  9. Julianne

    Julianne Guest

    "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Chad C." wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Andrew,
    > >
    > > Could you please elucidate your reasoning?
    > >
    >
    > One possible explanation for what I have observed is what
    > happens at a
    molecular
    > level when someone has hyperketonemia from being carb
    > deficient.
    >
    > This has been discussed before here at SMC and should be
    > archived in
    Google.
    >
    > Google keywords:
    >
    > hyperketonemia, Barry Sears, Atkins

    Andrew:

    I always find it a tad disturbing to see Sears and Atkins
    compared. I think Sears is so much more balanced than
    Atkins. Do you not agree?

    j
    >
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    >
    > You are welcome, Chad :)
    >
    >
    > Servant to the humblest person in the universe,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com/
    >
    > ** Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?W1F522557
    >
    > What is all this about?
    > http://makeashorterlink.com/?Z11841938
    >
    > Is this spam? http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
  10. Julianne wrote:

    > "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD" <[email protected]>
    > wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > "Chad C." wrote:
    > >
    > > > Hi Andrew,
    > > >
    > > > Could you please elucidate your reasoning?
    > > >
    > >
    > > One possible explanation for what I have observed is
    > > what happens at a
    > molecular
    > > level when someone has hyperketonemia from being carb
    > > deficient.
    > >
    > > This has been discussed before here at SMC and should be
    > > archived in
    > Google.
    > >
    > > Google keywords:
    > >
    > > hyperketonemia, Barry Sears, Atkins
    >
    > Andrew:
    >
    > I always find it a tad disturbing to see Sears and Atkins
    > compared. I think Sears is so much more balanced than
    > Atkins. Do you not agree?
    >
    > j

    Yes.

    Servant to the humblest person in the universe,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/

    **
    Who is the humblest person in the universe?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?L26062048

    What is all this about?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?P28052048

    Is this spam?
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?N69721867
     
Loading...