low carb is nothing but a gimmick

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Jimmy Camp, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Cubit <[email protected]> wrote:
    :>I think of the "rice, pasta, potatoes, bread" like sugar. What I
    :> mean is, if there is a pile of potatoes on my plate, I imagine it as
    :> a pile of sugar. This helps me. Eating a pile of sugar would taste
    :> good, but somehow it is obvious that one should not do it. We
    :> should feel the same way about a pile of pasta, but the lifetime
    :> training is different.

    I do exactly the same thing.

    :>
    :> I have suspected that in cooking and preparing starches, that the
    :> sugary nature is made apparent to the body on a subliminal level.
    :> There may not be an obvious sugar taste to the conscious mind, but
    :> somewhere deep inside our brain says: Damn, that's sugar! eat eat
    :>

    Most starches carbs taste sweet to me...

    :>
    :> "Hannah Gruen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :> news:[email protected]
    :>> "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    :>> news:[email protected]
    :>>
    :>> > Interestingly, LC also get rid of foods that many don't consider
    :>> > junk (rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, juice, and all the rest of
    :>> > that low fat stuff) and that still results in lowered calories,
    :>> > and weight loss.
    :>>
    :>> When you look at it from a nutrient density standpoint, however,
    :>> these "nonjunk" foods don't have much value either, they just
    :>> aren't as actively harmful as the "junk." Starchy foods don't
    :>> really contain much more than linked sugar molecules. The
    :>> proportion of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and protein is
    :>> proportionally *very* low compared to most low-starch
    :> vegetables.
    :>> I think most people overestimate the nutritional value in starchy
    :>> foods, such as grains, don't you?
    :>>
    :>> HG
     


  2. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    Hannah Gruen <allium28-riverhe[email protected]> wrote:
    :> They say that, left to their own selection, and not distracted by
    :> unnatural junk/processed foods, kids will generally choose a pretty
    :> good diet for themselves. I remember loving vegetables, wanting more
    :> meat/fish/chicken, and being less enthusiastic about starches. As if
    :> my body knew.

    Thing is, how can this be tested without influence?
     
  3. Roger Zoul wrote:
    > Hannah Gruen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > :> They say that, left to their own selection, and not distracted by
    > :> unnatural junk/processed foods, kids will generally choose a pretty
    > :> good diet for themselves. I remember loving vegetables, wanting more
    > :> meat/fish/chicken, and being less enthusiastic about starches. As if
    > :> my body knew.
    >
    > Thing is, how can this be tested without influence?


    A close aquaintance of mine works in a school. Being aware of the
    importance of low carb nutrition, she watches closely what the kids
    eat. Most will throw away the sandwiches, fruit and veggies and go
    straight to the candy, chips and soda. The worst behavior cases will be
    the ones to each the most junk. She sees it every single day. The good
    days for some kids are when she can convince them or their parents to
    skip the junk in the lunches and replace it with meat-filling
    sandwiches. It's amazing what you see when you know what to look for.

    TC
     
  4. Roger Zoul

    Roger Zoul Guest

    [email protected] wrote:
    :> Roger Zoul wrote:
    :>> Hannah Gruen <[email protected]> wrote:
    :>> :> They say that, left to their own selection, and not distracted by
    :>> :> unnatural junk/processed foods, kids will generally choose a
    :>> :> pretty good diet for themselves. I remember loving vegetables,
    :>> :> wanting more meat/fish/chicken, and being less enthusiastic
    :>> :> about starches. As if my body knew.
    :>>
    :>> Thing is, how can this be tested without influence?
    :>
    :> A close aquaintance of mine works in a school. Being aware of the
    :> importance of low carb nutrition, she watches closely what the kids
    :> eat. Most will throw away the sandwiches, fruit and veggies and go
    :> straight to the candy, chips and soda. The worst behavior cases will
    :> be the ones to each the most junk. She sees it every single day. The
    :> good days for some kids are when she can convince them or their
    :> parents to skip the junk in the lunches and replace it with
    :> meat-filling sandwiches. It's amazing what you see when you know
    :> what to look for.

    I would guess this as well. However, if you look at Hannah's statement,
    it's quite different from yours. How can one test to see if kids are not
    distracted by unnatural junk, that they will generally choose a pretty good
    diet? It seems to me if you don't distract them, then you leave them with
    no choices.....so...
     
  5. Hannah Gruen

    Hannah Gruen Guest

    "Roger Zoul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hannah Gruen <[email protected]> wrote:
    > :> They say that, left to their own selection, and not distracted by
    > :> unnatural junk/processed foods, kids will generally choose a pretty
    > :> good diet for themselves. I remember loving vegetables, wanting more
    > :> meat/fish/chicken, and being less enthusiastic about starches. As if
    > :> my body knew.
    >
    > Thing is, how can this be tested without influence?


    Good question, Roger, and it was like 30 years ago that I read about these
    studies, and they may have been old at that time. It would be easy enough to
    provide a young child with a home containing nothing but wholesome,
    relatively unprocessed, foods and to allow them to make their own selections
    from meals containing a good variety of these foods. That is my recollection
    of how these studies were performed. The children tend to select foods that
    represent a good, balanced diet.

    What messes things up is exposure to junk food, which is what happens when
    they leave that "ideal' home and go to birthday parties, school, fast food
    places. It is even reinforced ty TV ads. In the presence of that kind of
    junk, children cease to make good choices, as Tunderbar noted in his post.
    And I totally agree with you that this kind of influence is very difficult
    to avoid these days, especially with children beyond pre-school stage.

    My grandson, now 3-1/2, originally loved meat and all kinds of veggies and
    whole grains, although not bread, and adored fresh fruit. He generally did
    not like things that were too sweet, preferring the fruit. I fixed his
    pre-school lunches every day with that kind of food. But then the sugar
    crept in, through parental and school and other influences, and now he asks
    daddy to get him pies, french fries, and chocolate milk, and is (sadly)
    almost as dietarily messed up as any other American pre-schooler.

    HG
     
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