Low Resting Heart Rate and Cycling?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Tom Nakashima, Mar 15, 2004.

  1. I read Miguel Indurain had a resting heart rate of 28 bpm. I
    was wondering how a low resting heart rate relates to
    cycling? -tom
     
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  2. Andre

    Andre Guest

    This indicates that the cardiac output per beat is quite
    large. This is a measure of efficiency. It is more efficient
    for a heart to eject a large quantity of blood per beat,
    that it is for it to beat rapidly. The concept is similar to
    a diesel engine. It does not have "pep", but it puts out a
    large, constant horsepower efficiently. As I recall, when
    Indurain was at his best, his cardiac output was about 50 L
    / min. That's one hell of a pump...

    --
    --------------------------
    Andre Charlebois AGC-PC support http://agc-pc.tripod.com
    BPE, MCSE4.0, CNA, A+

    "Tom Nakashima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I read Miguel Indurain had a resting heart rate of 28 bpm.
    > I was wondering how a low resting heart rate relates to
    > cycling? -tom
     
  3. J999w

    J999w Guest

    I worry about what happens to that big 'ol heart if you
    stop cycling in old age (>70years) ... like any muscle, it
    will get weaker. Now you've just got this big, soggy 'ol
    heart for the electrical impulses to wander through
    leaving the potential for lethal arrhythmias or just plain
    heart failure.

    Any studies on this?

    jw milwaukee
     
  4. J999w schreef:

    > I worry about what happens to that big 'ol heart if you
    > stop cycling in old age (>70years) ... like any muscle, it
    > will get weaker. Now you've just got this big, soggy 'ol
    > heart for the electrical impulses to wander through
    > leaving the potential for lethal arrhythmias or just plain
    > heart failure.
    >

    Surely there are.

    But yesterday I was reading poems from the late great Herman
    De Coninck. There was a poem where he all of a sudden spoke
    of Rik Van Steenbergen's sportheart and his need to keep it
    in form at elevated age.

    De Coninck had a period when he was a rather fit and proud
    jogger, but he was a chainsmoke anddied rather early form
    heart failure.
     
  5. Gleshna

    Gleshna Guest

    >I worry about what happens to that big 'ol heart if you
    >stop cycling in old age (>70years) ... like any muscle, it
    >will get weaker.

    Teh efficiency of the circulatory system is not just the
    size of the heart muscle is it? In fact, does a runner doing
    long slow distance to build his base really make his heart
    bigger? Certainly new capillaries are created, etc.

    Gleshna - Multi-Thousandaire

    DA LAKES: Da Lake Tube:
    http://www.greatlakesurfing.com/images/Gallery/point.jpg Da
    new Lake Movie: http://www.unsalted.tv/ Da Bears ???????
     
  6. > I read Miguel Indurain had a resting heart rate of 28 bpm.
    > I was wondering how a low resting heart rate relates to
    > cycling? -tom
    >
    >
    I've done some study on this, since I have a 30 resting
    heart beat. In a nutshell it doesn't mean squat for
    performance. I still suck, but only because I won't
    lower myself to take performance enhancing drugs. It did
    cause a commotion when I was prepped for surgery, to
    correct some orthopedics that were put out of place in a
    cycling accident. The nurses kept checking it, until I
    told them I was in cycling, and then they trusted their
    measurement. I would only say that it is an indicator of
    how much you train. But I've seen a lot of Freds that do
    a hell of a lot of training.
     
  7. Evan Evans

    Evan Evans Guest

    People who suffer from under active thyroid often have very
    low heart rates. They also can be very much over weight. So
    your level of fitness doe's not directly relate to a low
    heart rate.
     
  8. J999w

    J999w Guest

    >>
    >>I worry about what happens to that big 'ol heart if you
    >>stop cycling in old age (>70years) ... like any muscle, it
    >>will get weaker.
    >
    >Teh efficiency of the circulatory system is not just the
    >size of the heart muscle is it? In fact, does a runner
    >doing long slow distance to build his base really make his
    >heart bigger? Certainly new capillaries are created, etc.
    >
    >
    >Gleshna - Multi-Thousandaire
    >

    Okay, I've been out of school for a while, but if I recall,
    _one_ of the adaptations of the heart to aerobic exercise is
    to grow larger. I know this is different from congestive
    heart failure where the heart tries to improve by getting
    larger, but remains an inefficient pump no matter how big it
    grows ... but what becomes of that once healthy, strong, yet
    larger than normal heart once you age and are no longer
    active? Does it weaken and become too big for it's own good?
    I would guess in the long run, it's going to be a better
    than average pump until your dying day, but is that the case
    if you stop training when you're 50+ ?

    Anyone know?

    jw milwaukee
     
  9. > People who suffer from under active thyroid often have
    > very low heart rates. They also can be very much over
    > weight. So your level of fitness doe's not directly relate
    > to a low heart rate.

    From personal experience, I went from 52 to 30 in 3 years. I
    think that's what most people experience, but I don't think
    on average, it indicates that everyone has a thyroid
    condition. Fat freaks isn't what he was talking about.
     
  10. Jtn

    Jtn Guest

    it doesn't mean shit.
    my vitals are:
    7.8 liters lung capacity, AM-RHR= 35, 29-32 when younger.

    and I suck....or is it maybe that I don't tend to train
    enough........no matter what you have under the hood if you
    don't ride the bike it doesn't matter..... just like Eddie
    says, "ride, ride, ride, and a little salt on the keabossa
    never hurts either..."

    "Tom Nakashima" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I read Miguel Indurain had a resting heart rate of 28 bpm.
    > I was wondering how a low resting heart rate relates to
    > cycling? -tom
     
  11. Chris

    Chris Guest

    While it is true that the majority of athletes will see a
    decrease in resting HR (RHR), it is not universal, nor is it
    a sign of performance potential. Case in point: Frank
    Shorter, known to most as a "pretty good" runner (Olympic
    Gold is pretty good) was reported to have a resting HR
    around 75 beats/min. That sucks, if he were competing in the
    resting HR games.

    The important thing to remember about most of the initial
    changes in performance (RHR, strength training and even
    endurance) is that there is always a neural component. In
    this case, at rest, the sympathetic nervous system (SNS-
    stimulating) decreases its input, and, more importantly, the
    parasympathetic (PNS-relaxing/digestion) increases its input
    to the heart. This input is the major reason why RHR
    decreases so rapidly after you start training, not an
    increase in heart size.

    Consequently, congestive heart failure (CHF) heart growth is
    completely different from the increase you see with
    endurance athletes. Certainly an overly large heart can lead
    to electrical problems (ie, arrhythmias), but the growth
    seen is not due to muscle growth - defined here as a thicker
    muscle, rather, the chambers get larger, while the wall
    thickness is largely unchanged. However, the heart muscle
    itself does get stronger, and the larger volume allows for
    greater filling capacity in the heart and ultimately greater
    pumping (per beat) capacity - Stroke volume. In contrast,
    CHF growth results in increase muscle tissue in parallel
    (ie, the fibers stack and run in parallel), creating very
    thick walls. Initially, the heart gets stronger from the
    greater work (CHF is a complicated process that increases
    the work on the heart, with the heart trying to adapt), but
    the thicker walls cause electrical problems, and more
    significantly, become difficult to perfuse with blood. As
    the diagram shows, the outer tissue gets the O2, but the
    inner tissue doesn't and eventually dies. Dead tissue
    doesn't conduct impulses and doesn't pump blood. Just like
    having big legs with a big gut and big ass makes climbing
    hills harder, all that dead tissue doesn't help with the
    heart function.

    [ + ] O2 ======> [ No ]
    [ O2 ][ + ] <====== O2 [ + ] [ + ]

    Hope this clears things up.

    Chris Harnish, M.S. Coach People Cycle, Inc.

    [email protected] (J999w) wrote in message news:<[email protected]
    m21.aol.com>...
    > >>
    > >>I worry about what happens to that big 'ol heart if you
    > >>stop cycling in old age (>70years) ... like any muscle,
    > >>it will get weaker.
    > >
    > >Teh efficiency of the circulatory system is not just
    > >the size of the heart muscle is it? In fact, does a
    > >runner doing long slow distance to build his base
    > >really make his heart bigger? Certainly new capillaries
    > >are created, etc.
    > >
    > >
    > >Gleshna - Multi-Thousandaire
    > >
    >
    > Okay, I've been out of school for a while, but if I
    > recall, _one_ of the adaptations of the heart to aerobic
    > exercise is to grow larger. I know this is different from
    > congestive heart failure where the heart tries to improve
    > by getting larger, but remains an inefficient pump no
    > matter how big it grows ... but what becomes of that once
    > healthy, strong, yet larger than normal heart once you
    > age and are no longer active? Does it weaken and become
    > too big for it's own good? I would guess in the long run,
    > it's going to be a better than average pump until your
    > dying day, but is that the case if you stop training when
    > you're 50+ ?
    >
    > Anyone know?
    >
    > jw milwaukee
     
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