Lubricating Cables

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Steve Walford, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. Having just renewed all the cables on my mountain bike and noticing they have a plastic/nylon liner
    inside the steel outer what is the best lubricant to use

    Thanks

    Steve
     
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  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Steve Walford posted ...

    > Having just renewed all the cables on my mountain bike and noticing they have a plastic/nylon
    > liner inside the steel outer what is the best lubricant to use

    Depends on the make and what the inner material actually is ..

    Many are Teflon covered and need no extra lubrication. If they are plain nylon, then they may need
    some extra lube, though most grades of Nylon are self-lubricating to an extent. A very light oil
    would do for these, but sparingly. If they're a polythene or othee plastic inner then almost any 'three-in-
    one' type oil will do .. ;)

    --
    Paul
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    > Steve Walford posted ...
    >
    >> Having just renewed all the cables on my mountain bike and noticing they have a plastic/nylon
    >> liner inside the steel outer what is the best lubricant to use
    >
    > Depends on the make and what the inner material actually is ..
    >
    > Many are Teflon covered and need no extra lubrication. If they are plain nylon, then they may need
    > some extra lube, though most grades of Nylon are self-lubricating to an extent. A very light oil
    > would do for these, but sparingly. If they're a polythene or othee plastic inner then almost any
    > 'three-in-one' type oil will do .. ;)

    Agreed, and cable lubrication is not so important these days anyway because inners (and outers?)
    tend to be stainless steel. I think part of the traditional reason for lubricating is to prevent or
    deal with corrosion.

    A method to sparingly lube is to wipe oil on the inner cable before inserting rather than drop a
    load into the housing.

    ~PB
     
  4. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Pete Biggs <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    : Agreed, and cable lubrication is not so important these days anyway

    True enough. I don't bother lubing new cables. However if old cables have got stiff and I don't want
    to replace the outers (on a commuting bike say) then I'll put some grease (the same stuff you put on
    ball bearings) on the inner before sliding it in. Does wonders for dodgy shifting.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune
     
  5. Pmailkeey

    Pmailkeey Guest

    On Wed, 18 Feb 2004 00:55:24 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    :)Agreed, and cable lubrication is not so important these days anyway )because inners (and outers?)
    :tend to be stainless steel. I think part of )the traditional reason for lubricating is to prevent
    :eek:r deal with )corrosion.

    And I thought it was to reduce friction within the cable !
    --
    Comm again, Mike.
     
  6. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    pmailkeey wrote:

    > :)Agreed, and cable lubrication is not so important these days anyway )because inners (and
    > :eek:uters?) tend to be stainless steel. I think )part of the traditional reason for lubricating is
    > :to prevent or
    ^^^^^
    > deal with :)corrosion.
    >
    > And I thought it was to reduce friction within the cable !

    Think about it. Preventing corrosion will minimise friction (as well as risk of broken cables) but
    stainless cables never corrode and certain lined and prelubricated new cables don't need any added
    lube, so so lubrication is less important than it used to be.

    ~PB
     
  7. Pmailkeey

    Pmailkeey Guest

    On Sun, 22 Feb 2004 19:23:24 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    :)pmailkeey wrote: ) )> :)Agreed, and cable lubrication is not so important these days anyway )>
    ::)because inners (and outers?) tend to be stainless steel. I think )> :)part of the traditional
    :reason for lubricating is to prevent or ) ^^^^^ )> deal with :)corrosion. )> )> And I thought it
    :was to reduce friction within the cable ! ) )Think about it. Preventing corrosion will minimise
    :friction (as well as )risk of broken cables) but stainless cables never corrode and certain )lined
    :and prelubricated new cables don't need any added lube, so so )lubrication is less important than
    :it used to be.

    These plastic/teflon coated ones, are they the ones which powder to the point the plastic/teflon
    jams in the outer ? Is this why I hear of cyclists frequently changing cables ?
    --
    Comm again, Mike.
     
  8. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    pmailkeey wrote:
    > These plastic/teflon coated ones, are they the ones which powder to the point the plastic/teflon
    > jams in the outer ?

    What brands do that?

    > Is this why I hear of cyclists frequently changing cables ?

    I don't frequently hear of cyclists frequently changing cables.

    ~PB
     
  9. McBain_v1

    McBain_v1 New Member

    Joined:
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    You should read this as it will give you some useful insights.

    Sheldon Brown - where would be without bearded cycling fanatics :rolleyes:
     
  10. Pmailkeey

    Pmailkeey Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 18:56:33 -0000, "Pete Biggs"
    <ptangerine{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    :)pmailkeey wrote: )> These plastic/teflon coated ones, are they the ones which powder to )> the
    :point the plastic/teflon jams in the outer ? ) )What brands do that?

    Dunno - but it became habitual replacing handbrake cables on cars for this reason. The plasticky
    bit used to jam forcing the inner cable to slide in it - before it to then jammed in all the
    generated powder !

    :) )> Is this why I hear of )> cyclists frequently changing cables ? ) )I don't frequently hear of
    :cyclists frequently changing cables.

    Neither do I, but I have hearrd it !
    --
    Comm again, Mike.
     
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