Mainland Munros that require scrambling?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Matthew Black, Jan 28, 2004.

  1. Chris Street

    Chris Street Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 19:02:25 +0000, Phil Cook
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 18:04:52 +0000, Martin Richardson wrote:
    >
    >>In message <[email protected]>, Matthew Black
    >><[email protected]> writes
    >>>I was wondering which of the Mainland Munro's require scrambling to reach the summit?
    >>
    >>Wouldn't a more interesting question be - which mainland mountains (sic) offer the joys of
    >>scrambling on the way to the summit?

    Can we extend to the Lakes? Sharp Edge to Blencathra in ice. Actually that's not a scramble, it's
    just suicide...

    >
    >Ben Klibreck, when it blowing a gale.

    --
    79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot. The other 42% are made up later on. In Warwick -
    looking at flat fields and that includes the castle.
     


  2. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

  3. Five Cats <[email protected][127.0.0.1]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    [127..0.1]:

    > In message <[email protected]>, Phil Cook <[email protected]
    > cook.freeserveSPAMTRAP.co.uk> writes
    >>On 28 Jan 2004 06:17:47 -0800, Matthew Black wrote:
    >>
    >>>I was wondering which of the Mainland Munro's require scrambling to reach the summit?
    >>
    >>Define scrambling.
    >
    > Also, do you mean one which can *only* be reached by scrambling, or
    one
    > which *can* be reached by scrambling but which has some other routes
    as
    > well.
    >

    That'll be most if not all of them then.

    --
    Adrian
     
  4. "Ian Dainty" <[email protected]> writes:

    >"Five Cats" <[email protected][127.0.0.1]> wrote in message news:[email protected][127.0.0.1]

    >> Also, do you mean one which can *only* be reached by scrambling, or one which *can* be reached by
    >> scrambling but which has some other routes as well.

    >Also, "It depends". Roger C once stated that the majority of Crib Goch could be walked with hands
    >in pockets.

    But there are some rocky slopes which experienced climbers and scramblers can walk up with hands in
    pockets, but which the inexperienced will only ascend on all fours.

    I can recall two walks in which an inexperienced hillwalker got scared and stuck to the "rockface"
    (slope less than 45 degrees), while the rest of the party walked (no hands) all around the stuck
    person discussing how best to proceed.

    I can also recall a public park in which climbing was forbidden, and defined by the park keepers as
    "using your hands". We found a route up a cliff which we found a way of climbing with hands in
    pockets, although elbows and "body leans" were used here and there.

    The park keepers, after some discussion, informed us that when the bye laws specified a climb as
    needing hands, it meant that they, park keepers, would need to use to use their hands.

    Then there are those rocky slopes which are walks in the dry and scrambles in the wet.

    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  5. Chris Street

    Chris Street Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 16:43:58 +0000 (UTC), "Ian Dainty"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Five Cats" <[email protected][127.0.0.1]> wrote in message news:[email protected][127.0.0.1]
    >
    >> Also, do you mean one which can *only* be reached by scrambling, or one which *can* be reached by
    >> scrambling but which has some other routes as well.
    >
    >Also, "It depends". Roger C once stated that the majority of Crib Goch could be walked with hands
    >in pockets.

    I'll walk up from hollow stones to mickledore hands in pockets. Other people will baulk and demand
    ropes and climbing gear - it kind of depends on your experience and balance. CG probably is fairly
    easy but my usual walking partner wouldn't have a bar of it.

    --
    79.84% of all statistics are made up on the spot. The other 42% are made up later on. In Warwick -
    looking at flat fields and that includes the castle.
     
  6. Ian Dainty

    Ian Dainty Guest

  7. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 23:13:04 GMT, RJ Webb wrote:

    >On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 19:02:22 +0000, Phil Cook <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 16:53:32 GMT, RJ Webb wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 28 Jan 2004 06:17:47 -0800, [email protected] (Matthew Black) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>I was wondering which of the Mainland Munro's require scrambling to reach the summit?
    >>>
    >>>Ben A'an Beinn Mheadhoin both have summit tors
    >>
    >>Forgot about the latter, but it is dead easy scrambling, not exposed at all unless there is a
    >>force eight blowing.
    >
    >Or its heavily rimed... I had a fun tussle. Well iced up, but flimsy stuff that would not hold an
    >axe placement. My 2nd hardest Munro of my round on the day (Am Basteir was the worst, just one move
    >but scary, Inn pinn was roped, so an easy climb as opposed to a gripping "walk")

    It was a little icy on my visit. I got halfway up and then hopped down to put the crampons on. I
    climbed from the lee side (NE) and the wind nearly blew me off when I stuck my head over the top.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  8. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Thu, 29 Jan 2004 00:33:59 GMT, [email protected] (Chris
    Street) wrote:

    >
    >I'll walk up from hollow stones to mickledore hands in pockets.

    But that *is* a walk!

    >. CG probably is fairly easy

    If you choose the best route - but it's definitely a scramble whichever way you go. I don't think
    the two are comparable.

    --

    Paul

    My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003):

    http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
     
  9. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    >The park keepers, after some discussion, informed us that when the bye laws specified a climb as
    >needing hands, it meant that they, park keepers, would need to use to use their hands.

    Blimey, that lot would probably need hands just to get up Arthur's Seat. Had plenty of good
    scrambles up there, yet to get caught.

    Was up it on Tuesday morning, admiring the reinforced trig point.

    Nice new steps on some of the paths.
    http://www.crux.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/balbum/Scotland/28a/ArthursSeat.html

    Richard Webb
     
  10. Ian Dainty

    Ian Dainty Guest

  11. [email protected] (RJ Webb) writes:

    >>The park keepers, after some discussion, informed us that when the bye laws specified a climb as
    >>needing hands, it meant that they, park keepers, would need to use to use their hands.

    >Blimey, that lot would probably need hands just to get up Arthur's Seat. Had plenty of good
    >scrambles up there, yet to get caught.

    >Was up it on Tuesday morning, admiring the reinforced trig point.

    >Nice new steps on some of the paths.
    >http://www.crux.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/balbum/Scotland/28a/ArthursSeat.html

    There's a great deal of such new steppery. There's a direct scrambling route up to the summit from
    the direction of the Commonwealth Pool (heading NE towards the summit) which goes up a steep grass
    slope (the earth slide to the left of which is known as the "gutted haddie", the crag to the right
    "half moon crag") and either crosses the top of the earth slide to the left to go up a crack towards
    the summit (an easy securely unexposed scramble inside a deep cleft) or meanders up the rocks
    straight ahead towards the summit (a more threateningly exposed scramble in which it's easy to drift
    into rather difficult bits).

    The difficult and more damgerous meander is marked as a path on all the maps, whereas the easier way
    up the crack is rarely marked. Consequently lots of tourists go up the harder way, some of them
    getting into difficulties.

    Why is the harder and less frequently used path marked on the maps, whereas the easier and more used
    path isn't? I think it's because the maps are made by non-locals, who map the "visible" paths, i.e.,
    those which are marked by worn grooves in the vegetation. Scrambles on pure rock leave no easily
    visible marks except polishing, and in this case the route is hidden in a crack and so the polishing
    is not visible from outside the route. And of course using today's aerial photos you can esily see
    tracks in grass, but tracks over rocks are not visible.

    I was disappointed to see that the first steps in this area ignored the easy route and led folk up
    towards the well-mapped harder route. To be fair it actually hopes to lead you off this towards the
    much easier (and more scenic) upwards circuit to the right. However, I was pleased to see that
    someone has later amended the steps to include a diversion off towards the start of the easy
    "crack" route.
    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  12. [email protected] (Nick Kew) writes:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] (RJ Webb) writes:

    >> Blimey, that lot would probably need hands just to get up Arthur's Seat. Had plenty of good
    >> scrambles up there, yet to get caught.

    >Get caught? You mean it's not allowed?

    "Climbing", which is defined in the by-laws as "needing the assistance of hands", i.e., what we
    would consider scrambling, is specifically forbidden. But the folk who police the bye laws are the
    park keepers, who are very stronlgy disinclined to any kind of exertion, i.e., going up the hill.
    They're also pretty unfit, so it would be surprising if you couldn't get away by simply heading up
    hill at a good pace. So the only places you'll get harassed by them are on Salisbury Crags, or Half
    Moon Crag (the lowest crag of the actual hill).

    There's also a special dispensation which has been won by local climbers for the part of Salisbury
    Crags known as the "South Quarry". According to the rules you are allowed to climb there, provided
    you can show on demand a membership card of a climbing club. This is, however, only very rarely
    asked for, and if it is, and you don't have one, you'll most likely just be told to make sure you
    have it next time.

    There are plenty of nearly impossible pitches in the permitted South Quarry, well marked with chalk,
    plus a good training low-level (safe to fall off) traverse of the entire quarry which I've never
    seen anyone do without falling off, although I'm prepared to believe the rumour that Dougal Haston
    did. On fine days you'll find plenty of folk messing about in South quarry in rock shoes with chalky
    hands, often with crash mats to cushion their falls.

    >I thought arthurs seat looked a lot of fun for an inner-city thing.

    It is. There's lots of fun scrambles on it, and many small pitches where even the best scramblers
    would probably want some protection (rope etc.). You just have to be careful to keep away from the
    lowland excursions of the keepers, or visibility from busybodies on public paths who might ring the
    keepers up on their mobiles. Not at all difficult. Even on the finest days, when the summit is as
    crowded as a fairground, you don't have to move far to get off the beaten track and into seriously
    craggy territory where you'd need a telescope to recognise the nearest visible human.
    --
    Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
     
  13. Rj Webb

    Rj Webb Guest

    >There's also a special dispensation which has been won by local climbers for the part of Salisbury
    >Crags known as the "South Quarry".

    My first ever excursions into the world of cli*bing were made there, and Blackford Hill
    Quarry (yuch).

    Even South Quarry was illegal then, but the Park Police kept to a timetable.

    Richard Webb
     
  14. Glen

    Glen Guest

    On Wed, 28 Jan 2004 15:24:27 +0000, Phil Cook
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 28 Jan 2004 06:17:47 -0800, Matthew Black wrote:
    >
    >>I was wondering which of the Mainland Munro's require scrambling to reach the summit?
    >
    >Define scrambling.

    First steal 6 eggs. Crack into whiking bowel Add milk pepper and salt to taste Whisk untill well
    mixed Add quarter pound real butter to pan Melt Add egg mix. Keep the mix on the move untill
    cooked ENJOY

    Glen . . . Thought For The Day
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    " You can always tell when a politician is lying. Their lips move."
    - Max Headroom
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
     
  15. Craven Birds

    Craven Birds Guest

    "Phil Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 28 Jan 2004 06:17:47 -0800, Matthew Black wrote:
    >
    > >I was wondering which of the Mainland Munro's require scrambling to reach the summit?
    >
    > Define scrambling.

    When you need 3 points of contact? i.e. need the use hands as well as feet or is that
    climbing, maybe ;-)

    The In-Pin's just a scramble, if experienced;-)

    --
    Craven Birds

    Bird sightings based around 'Craven' Skipton, North Yorks. http://cravenbirds.mysite.freeserve.com/
    http://www.freewebs.com/birding/ http://mysite.freeserve.com/cravenbirds
     
  16. Theo

    Theo Guest

    > > Define scrambling.
    >
    > When you need 3 points of contact? i.e. need the use hands as well as feet or is that climbing,
    > maybe ;-)
    >
    > The In-Pin's just a scramble, if experienced;-)
    >

    A friend of mine scrambled the In-Pin when he was in his sixtees. He scrambled the long way up and
    the long way back down again (facing inwards). It's a question of nerves.

    Theo
     
Loading...