Maintenance for beginners

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by J-P.S, Feb 13, 2003.

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  1. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 16 Feb 2003 14:31:17 +0000, "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >NO! NO! Never let WD-40 near your bike!

    I often use WD40 on my bike. Arriving home from a soaking wet commute I give the chain and rear
    cassette a spray while spinning the pedals to get rid of as much water as I can, then leave for a
    while to evaporate and oil. I realise I need to keep it away from bearings etc so that sort of usage
    can't do much harm can it?

    Bob
    --
    Mail address is spam trapped To reply by email remove the beverage
     


  2. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:

    >> WD40? I use it a lot, but I've read differing opinions about it. Would it mix well with a
    >> wax lube?
    >
    > NO! NO! Never let WD-40 near your bike!
    >
    > The problem with WD-40 is it has loads of solvent in it - if you spray it round your bike it can
    > get in the bearings, where it washes the grease out a treat and leaves you with grease-free
    > bearings. Nice and clean, granted, but they rapidly become functionally sub-optimal.

    I agree that it's risky near bearings - but it can be sprayed /carefully/. I don't see any harm in
    spraying using it on mechs* and calipers if a rag is used to protect the surrounding area (and brake
    pads are degreased afterwards). Works well for me - very quick & easy way to clean, and leaves a
    trace of protection and lubrication on these particular parts that do not need much lube.

    WD40 is crap where substantial lubrication is required, though - like chains (and it will NOT mix
    well with a wax lube).

    * except mechs (and perhaps brakes) with ball bearings (unless take jockeys out, etc).

    ~PB
     
  3. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    j-p.s wrote:

    > ) Anyway, lubes that ) contain lots of solvent should be good at getting to the innards (thin on )
    > application, then solvent evapourates, leaving just the actual lube).
    >
    > WD40? I use it a lot, but I've read differing opinions about it. Would it mix well with a
    > wax lube?

    I've not tried it but I suspect it would be a horrible sticky mixture - because WD40, although
    mostly solvent, contains light oil which will not all evapourate.

    Applying a wax lube to a chain which is still wet with white spirit (after cleaning) can work though
    - at least it has for me with Castrol Chain Wax* (a soft medium-dry wax). This might help get it
    into the works (although the Castrol stuff is already thin to begin with). Don't know how it would
    work with faster setting harder waxes like Krytech or WL.

    * This motorcycle chain lube keeps chain cleaner than oil does, cheaper and lasts a bit longer than
    Krytech but still doesn't lube /very well/. And nozzle gets clogged all the time on my can :-(

    ~PB
     
  4. Pete Biggs

    Pete Biggs Guest

    Call me Bob wrote:

    >> NO! NO! Never let WD-40 near your bike!
    >
    > I often use WD40 on my bike. Arriving home from a soaking wet commute I give the chain and rear
    > cassette a spray while spinning the pedals to get rid of as much water as I can, then leave for a
    > while to evaporate and oil. I realise I need to keep it away from bearings etc so that sort of
    > usage can't do much harm can it?

    (See my other reply regarding WD40 and harm to bearings). On and near the cassette is dodgy though
    (too near hub bearings, I think); water shouldn't harm cassette anyway (using chromed sprockets
    helps). And sprockets don't strictly need any lube at all, anyway.

    I've never found it necessary to use WD40 or anything to get rid of water & moisture when bike is
    stored in a heated house (as all my bikes always have been). Even on bikes on which I've done
    bugger-all maintenance, no rust* or corrosion has ever developed.

    * apart from occasional superficial rust on chain - not a problem - chain will wear out long, long
    before it rusts away. Just relubing is when dry seems good enough ...although, if want to relube
    immediately after a wet ride, then perhaps WD40 beforehand is useful (?). ......So chain might be
    an exeption, so carry on if it works for you. (just be careful).

    ~PB
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 16 Feb 2003 18:16:06 -0000, "Pete Biggs" <pLime{remove_fruit}@biggs.tc> wrote:

    >I've never found it necessary to use WD40 or anything to get rid of water & moisture when bike is
    >stored in a heated house (as all my bikes always have been). Even on bikes on which I've done
    >bugger-all maintenance, no rust* or corrosion has ever developed.
    >
    >* apart from occasional superficial rust on chain - not a problem

    Precisely my experience - with the addition of a dry (unheated) bike shed, where placing wet bikes
    also causes no deterioration.

    The only times I've felt the need to oil a wet chain is when I've washed the bikes down after an
    offroad excursion, in which case I use my normal chain lube. I also drip some on the brake and
    derailleur pivots.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  6. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Sun, 16 Feb 2003 18:16:06 -0000, Pete Biggs scrawled: ) I've never found it necessary to use WD40
    or anything to get rid of water ) & moisture when bike is stored in a heated house (as all my bikes
    always ) have been). Even on bikes on which I've done bugger-all maintenance, no ) rust* or
    corrosion has ever developed.

    My bike may need to be stored outside on occasion, as there's not enough room at my gf's house for
    another bike. I'll keep it covered, but I may try the WD40 trick if it rains. Time to buy a cover
    for the bike, methinks.

    J-P
    --
    "We have footage, too alarming to show you, of a little boy being interfered with by a penis-shaped
    soundwave generated by an online paedophile." --Kate Thornton
     
  7. Mike Causer

    Mike Causer Guest

    On Fri, 14 Feb 2003 02:50:18 +0000, David Green wrote:

    > "j-p.s" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    >> What can I do myself, and what should I (as a non-mechanic) leave to a six-monthly service at a
    >> decent bike shop?
    >
    > DIY:
    >
    > -keep tyres well inflated (get a track-pump, use weekly)

    [ advice snipped]

    - If you live near Cambridge attend one of David Green's bicycle maintenance courses. Or, if
    in other parts of the Empire, contact your local Cycling Campaign to see if there is
    anything on offer.

    Mike
     
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