Make a TOOL!

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Lindsay Rowland, Apr 4, 2003.

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  1. I recently had great success fashioning a tool to remove an obscure (?) cassette.

    It's a long story why I got to do this so I'll spare the details of that end of things, but
    basically I had to remove a cassette to replace a broken spoke on a friend's bike. The cassette is a
    Shimano one I've never encountered before. The Shimano tool I have has worked in every other
    situation but this one had a smaller diameter internal spline. I didn't want to buy a tool for the
    sake of a one-off and I never, ever go near the LBS so my options were rather limited.

    On the cassette there are twelve splines so I reasoned that a hex head bolt just the right size was
    a possibility. My calipers measured a nominal 17mm and yep, a bolt I just happened to have stored
    away was a reasonable fit. Having no nuts to fit the bolt was a bit of a let down so I gathered up
    my determination and headed for the local automotive supplier at lunch time the following day.

    I spotted an alternative candidate on a display stand of packaged nuts and bolts. The sales guy even
    opened the package and calipered the bolt for me and it was rather exciting to come up with a bolt
    head measuring 17.8mm. I figured I could always file the sucker down if it didn't fit in the
    cassette. To cut to the chase, the bolt fitted in with some encouraging nudges from a hammer -
    excellent. The downside was that I couldn't get the locknuts tight enough on the bolt to budge the
    cassette. Move to plan 'e': I dropped in to an automotive exhaust fitting shop at lunchtime the
    following day and had the very obliging dude there weld one of the nuts to the bolt. He didn't even
    want any money but I left $4 in change on his bench.

    When I got home after work I hacksawed of the superfluous thread sticking out of the nut, hammer the
    bolt head into the cassette, loaded the socket onto the welded nut, prayed and did a mental check of
    where I could possibly pick up a 27" wheel if this cassette wouldn't come off, and whacked the hell
    out of the socket bar. Voila! It came off as sweet as anything.

    I replaced the spokes, trued the wheel, etc, etc, and happily delivered the bike tonight.

    It just goes to show that with a bit of thought, a lot of luck and some sense, anything is possible.
    I should add too that the bolt that saved the day was high tensile and I doubt anything less would
    have survived. All up it cost me around $10 (the nut and bolt package cost $5) and I have an extra
    tool in my kit. Oh, and I've found that if you honour the people who helped it definitely pays off
    in the future.

    Hope this helps, cheerz,

    Lynzz
     
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  2. J. Price

    J. Price Guest

    Lindsay Rowlands <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I recently had great success fashioning a tool to remove an obscure (?) cassette.
    >
    > It's a long story why I got to do this so I'll spare the details of that end of things, but
    > basically I had to remove a cassette to replace a broken spoke on a friend's bike. The cassette is
    > a Shimano one I've never encountered before. The Shimano tool I have has worked in every other
    > situation but this one had a smaller diameter internal spline. I didn't want to buy a tool for the
    > sake of a one-off and I never, ever go near the LBS so my options were rather limited.
    >
    > On the cassette there are twelve splines so I reasoned that a hex head bolt just the right size
    > was a possibility. My calipers measured a nominal 17mm and yep, a bolt I just happened to have
    > stored away was a reasonable fit. Having no nuts to fit the bolt was a bit of a let down so I
    > gathered up my determination and headed for the local automotive supplier at lunch time the
    > following day.
    >
    > I spotted an alternative candidate on a display stand of packaged nuts and bolts. The sales guy
    > even opened the package and calipered the bolt for me and it was rather exciting to come up with a
    > bolt head measuring 17.8mm. I figured I could always file the sucker down if it didn't fit in the
    > cassette. To cut to the chase, the bolt fitted in with some encouraging nudges from a hammer -
    > excellent. The downside was that I couldn't get the locknuts tight enough on the bolt to budge the
    > cassette. Move to plan 'e': I dropped in to an automotive exhaust fitting shop at lunchtime the
    > following day and had the very obliging dude there weld one of the nuts to the bolt. He didn't
    > even want any money but I left $4 in change on his bench.
    >
    > When I got home after work I hacksawed of the superfluous thread sticking out of the nut, hammer
    > the bolt head into the cassette, loaded the socket onto the welded nut, prayed and did a mental
    > check of where I could possibly pick up a 27" wheel if this cassette wouldn't come off, and
    > whacked the hell out of the socket bar. Voila! It came off as sweet as anything.
    >
    > I replaced the spokes, trued the wheel, etc, etc, and happily delivered the bike tonight.
    >
    > It just goes to show that with a bit of thought, a lot of luck and some sense, anything is
    > possible. I should add too that the bolt that saved the day was high tensile and I doubt anything
    > less would have survived. All up it cost me around $10 (the nut and bolt package cost $5) and I
    > have an extra tool in my kit. Oh, and I've found that if you honour the people who helped it
    > definitely pays off in the future.
    >
    > Hope this helps, cheerz,
    >
    > Lynzz

    .....................Very clever. Perhaps it was a Shimano freewheel? and a Park FR-1 for $6 would
    have been a worthwhile addition to the tool collection.I use mine all the time....regards.
     
  3. Bob Denton

    Bob Denton Guest

    On 4 Apr 2003 11:54:03 GMT, Lindsay Rowlands <[email protected]> wrote:

    No offense Lindsay, but either your time is worth less than nothing, or you are a few short of a six
    pack. Your post reads like a script from Mr. Bean, the bike mechanic.

    Wouldn't have been easier to take the wheel to your local bike wrench and pay them a few bucks to
    remove the cassette? No bolt shopping, no welding, no wasted time???

    Cya

    Bob Denton Gulf Stream International Delray Beach, Florida www.sinkthestink.com Manufacturers of
    Sink the Stink
     
  4. Bob Denton <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 4 Apr 2003 11:54:03 GMT, Lindsay Rowlands <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    cut
    >
    > Wouldn't have been easier to take the wheel to your local bike wrench and pay them a few bucks to
    > remove the cassette?

    My LBS charges 50p (sc 75 cents in the USA) for removing a freewheel or cassette - no guesses what
    course of action I took in a similar situation!

    (I do admire the ingenuity and persistance of the alternative method).
     
  5. "Lindsay Rowlands" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I recently had great success fashioning a tool to remove an obscure (?) cassette.
    >
    > It's a long story .....

    Lindsay, GREAT!!! I applaud your tool making adventure. Best Regards, Larry
     
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