MAP or monthly test

Discussion in 'Power Training' started by msummers, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. msummers

    msummers New Member

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    I have a power tap pro and have just got started with power training. Should I expect the 3 x1 minute all out efforts performed during the "monthly test" as recommended to be consistant with the ramp MAP test? Can you spend to much time at sub maximal efforts during the ramp test that would diminish your final 1 minute? Does the incremental watt increase affect the outcome? Can I use the "monthly test" results to establish MAP?

    Thanks
    mike s
     
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  2. frenchyge

    frenchyge New Member

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    I'm not sure what "monthly test" you're referring to, but 1-min max efforts will be at a much higher power than the MAP test because the ramping time does indeed affect the power during the last minute. 1-minute efforts from a rested state will be primarily anaerobic efforts, while the ramping of the MAP test is to ensure that the power being measured during that last minute is purely a result of *aerobic* capacity. Note that the ramp rate is different depending on the level of the rider, and starting power is set so that the entire test takes about 8-15 minutes.
     
  3. acoggan

    acoggan Member

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    The answer to both of these questions is "yes".
     
  4. acoggan

    acoggan Member

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    The way most people approach the measurement of MAP, the rate of increase in power is such that the final minute typically requires 105-120% (most often 110-115%) of VO2max. If you want the final stage to require "only" 100% of VO2max, you need to use a rather slow rate of increase - say +25 W every 5 min. That way you use up all/most of your anaerobic capacity on the way to failure, such that you can't significantly exceed your VO2max during the final stage.
     
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