Maps on CD

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Danny Colyer, May 6, 2003.

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  1. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    A friend asked me at the weekend if I knew of any CD of cycling routes, where he could specify an
    area of the country and see a list of suggested routes. Alternatively, he wondered if there was any
    software that could be used for route planning.

    Any suggestions?

    I've just checked the Sustrans website, because it occurred to me that they might publish their
    route guide on CD, but it appears not.

    I don't know if the Edinburgh Bicycle CD had anything like this on it - that seems to no longer be
    available.

    Of course Autoroute and similar software can be great for planning bike rides, particularly if you
    specify 0mph for motorways, 5mph for A roads and 15mph for white roads (or something similar). But
    then you're missing out on towpaths and cyclepaths.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
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  2. Rg

    Rg Guest

    "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A friend asked me at the weekend if I knew of any CD of cycling routes, where he could specify an
    > area of the country and see a list of suggested routes. Alternatively, he wondered if there was
    > any software that could be used for route planning.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > I've just checked the Sustrans website, because it occurred to me that they might publish their
    > route guide on CD, but it appears not.
    >
    > I don't know if the Edinburgh Bicycle CD had anything like this on it - that seems to no longer be
    > available.
    >
    > Of course Autoroute and similar software can be great for planning bike rides, particularly if you
    > specify 0mph for motorways, 5mph for A roads and 15mph for white roads (or something similar). But
    > then you're missing out on towpaths and cyclepaths.
    >
    > --
    > Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    > http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    > Thomas Paine
    >
    >

    There are two vendors who sell CDs with the 1-50000 OS maps - they both have facilities to plot
    routes and print out maps and also create profile charts
    (i.e. show you where the hills are) - they are Anquet and MemoryMap - a quick Google will find them.

    RG
     
  3. M Series

    M Series Guest

    I use a OS map on CD, which allows me to zoom in, measure distances, scroll and importantly print a
    small map to take with me. Shows only roads but I am a roadie so thats OK.

    I like maps and planning routes, its no fun just following the dotted line

    "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A friend asked me at the weekend if I knew of any CD of cycling routes, where he could specify an
    > area of the country and see a list of suggested routes. Alternatively, he wondered if there was
    > any software that could be used for route planning.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > I've just checked the Sustrans website, because it occurred to me that they might publish their
    > route guide on CD, but it appears not.
    >
    > I don't know if the Edinburgh Bicycle CD had anything like this on it - that seems to no longer be
    > available.
    >
    > Of course Autoroute and similar software can be great for planning bike rides, particularly if you
    > specify 0mph for motorways, 5mph for A roads and 15mph for white roads (or something similar). But
    > then you're missing out on towpaths and cyclepaths.
    >
    > --
    > Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    > http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    > Thomas Paine
     
  4. Slapster

    Slapster Guest

    I use Memory Map Navigator. This is a set of CD's (six in total) which cover either the North on
    England, or (in my case) the South. They are basically the same as looking at an Ordnance Survey
    Landranger
    1:50,000.

    I have to say that they are bloody marvellous, although to be fair, I bought them specifically to be
    compatible/downloadable with my GPS.

    The maps allow you to plot routes, giving you distances, projected times, and a terrain profile
    (up`s & down`s), and also to print off any section of the maps and/or routes.

    The only problem is the cost - as this set cost well over £100 to buy.

    The Anquet version is about the same, and I was informed, when I was looking to purchase, that the
    reason for the costs, were Ordnance Surveys Licensing costs for using their maps, the Copyright of
    which, they guard quite jealously (and rightly, too, I say).

    Initially I thought it was just too much wonga, but now I have it, and the memory of the cost is
    fading - I reckon its well worth it....

    --

    Greetings from The Slapster in Cornwall, UK

    The best way to deter predators, is to taste lousy!!

    http://www.slapster.org.uk

    "Danny Colyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > A friend asked me at the weekend if I knew of any CD of cycling routes, where he could specify an
    > area of the country and see a list of suggested routes. Alternatively, he wondered if there was
    > any software that could be used for route planning.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > I've just checked the Sustrans website, because it occurred to me that they might publish their
    > route guide on CD, but it appears not.
    >
    > I don't know if the Edinburgh Bicycle CD had anything like this on it - that seems to no longer be
    > available.
    >
    > Of course Autoroute and similar software can be great for planning bike rides, particularly if you
    > specify 0mph for motorways, 5mph for A roads and 15mph for white roads (or something similar). But
    > then you're missing out on towpaths and cyclepaths.
    >
    > --
    > Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    > http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    > Thomas Paine
     
  5. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    RG wrote:
    > There are two vendors who sell CDs with the 1-50000 OS maps - they both have facilities to plot
    > routes and print out maps and also create profile charts (i.e. show you where the hills are) -
    > they are Anquet and MemoryMap - a quick Google will find them.

    Thanks. http://www.memorymap.com seems to be something slighly different -
    http://navcity.co.uk/catalog/product_info.php+products_id+209 looks a little more promising for
    that. http://anquet.co.uk/ is the other, and is much cheaper.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  6. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    M Series wrote:
    > I use a OS map on CD ...

    Which I see can be purchased for only 19.99 from http://www.ordnancesurvey.gov.uk (a site which is a
    pain to access, because I can only see it if I drop my firewall).

    That's cheaper than Memory Map or Anquetil, anyway, though perhaps without as many features. Thanks.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  7. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Tue, 6 May 2003 21:28:57 +0100, M Series scrawled: ) I use a OS map on CD, which allows me to
    zoom in, measure distances, scroll ) and importantly print a small map to take with me. Shows only
    roads but I am ) a roadie so thats OK.

    What's the coverage of the 1:50,000 and 1:25,000 maps on those CDs? It says "limited coverage", and
    although the 1:250,000 maps cover the whole country, they're limited road detail instead.

    J-P
    --
    Don't touch it. Run. Hide. Smile and say you love everybody equally, and don't make any jokes as you
    back out of the room. Race and humor only work in a comedy club with exclusively black comedians.
    That's it.
     
  8. M Series

    M Series Guest

    It is basically the same as the OS road atlases which I am very familiar with, it shows the
    small un classified roads but not RUPPS, bridleways , paths etc. As I said I only use roads so
    it fits the bill

    I got the Fourth Edition from a bloke on eBay for £10, still more expensive than a cheap paper road
    atlas, I got one of those from a cheap bookshop for £1.99 !

    "j-p.s" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Tue, 6 May 2003 21:28:57 +0100, M Series scrawled: ) I use a OS map on CD, which allows me to
    > zoom in, measure distances,
    scroll
    > ) and importantly print a small map to take with me. Shows only roads but
    I am
    > ) a roadie so thats OK.
    >
    > What's the coverage of the 1:50,000 and 1:25,000 maps on those CDs? It says "limited coverage",
    > and although the 1:250,000 maps cover the whole country, they're limited road detail instead.
    >
    > J-P
    > --
    > Don't touch it. Run. Hide. Smile and say you love everybody equally, and
    don't
    > make any jokes as you back out of the room. Race and humor only work in a comedy club with
    > exclusively black comedians. That's it.
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Slapster6 @btopenworld.com says...
    > I use Memory Map Navigator. This is a set of CD's (six in total) which cover either the North on
    > England, or (in my case) the South.

    They have just started doing a Central version, and you can get the whole country or individual
    regions at more and less cost respectively.

    The Central map set covers the bulk of English and Welsh walking areas.

    > They are basically the same as looking at an Ordnance Survey Landranger
    > 1:50,000.
    >
    > I have to say that they are bloody marvellous, although to be fair, I bought them specifically to
    > be compatible/downloadable with my GPS.
    >
    > The maps allow you to plot routes, giving you distances, projected times, and a terrain profile
    > (up`s & down`s), and also to print off any section of the maps and/or routes.
    >
    > The only problem is the cost - as this set cost well over £100 to buy.

    My problem with the current release is that it can't be expanded cheaply (other than buying pre-2003
    map CDs with no height data.) To expand from one region you need to buy the software again with a
    second data set rather than just buying the data set. I did email Memorymap about this, especially
    as they claim their latest version is better value for money, and they completely ignored my email.

    Colin
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Tue, 6 May 2003 21:28:57 +0100, M Series scrawled: ) I use a OS map on CD, which allows me to
    > zoom in, measure distances, scroll ) and importantly print a small map to take with me. Shows only
    > roads but I am ) a roadie so thats OK.
    >
    > What's the coverage of the 1:50,000 and 1:25,000 maps on those CDs? It says "limited coverage",
    > and although the 1:250,000 maps cover the whole country, they're limited road detail instead.

    Memorymap, referred to elsewhere in this thread, offers the whole of the country on 1:50,000 and are
    currently talking to the OS about providing the 1:25,000 maps on CD. It costs a bit, mind.

    Colin
     
  11. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Slapster <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The Anquet version is about the same, and I was informed, when I was looking to purchase, that the
    > reason for the costs, were Ordnance Surveys Licensing costs for using their maps, the Copyright of
    > which, they guard quite jealously (and rightly, too, I say).

    Why rightly too? I am a taxpayer, I have paid for the OS to create the information, why should I
    have to pay them again to look at my information?

    --
    Marc Tabards, banners and signs for fundraising events and charities
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
  12. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Wed, 7 May 2003 10:30:17 +0100, marc scrawled: )> The Anquet version is about the same, and I was
    informed, when I was looking )> to purchase, that the reason for the costs, were Ordnance Surveys
    Licensing )> costs for using their maps, the Copyright of which, they guard quite )> jealously (and
    rightly, too, I say). ) ) Why rightly too? I am a taxpayer, I have paid for the OS to create the )
    information, why should I have to pay them again to look at my ) information?

    The price of an OS map, or the two-CD set, is pretty small, considering. And the maps are freely
    available on the website, so the simplistic answer is "you don't." Or do you actually mean "why
    should I have to pay them again for a middle-man to repackage the information?"

    J-P
    --
    One very famous line from the book which is widely quoted is "It is by will alone that I set my mind
    in motion". Unfortunately most people who quote that are weak and boring people who are incapable of
    the intensity required of someone who tries to live with that philosophy.
     
  13. J-P.S

    J-P.S Guest

    On Wed, 7 May 2003 09:05:04 +0100, Colin Blackburn scrawled: ) Memorymap, referred to elsewhere in
    this thread, offers the whole of the ) country on 1:50,000 and are currently talking to the OS about
    providing ) the 1:25,000 maps on CD. It costs a bit, mind.

    Therein lies the problem. I think in the short term I should just invest in paper-based OS coverage
    of the surrounding counties rather than worrying about what's happening (geographically speaking)
    in Cornwall.

    J-P
    --
    "Originally patents were a bargain to protect a little man with a brilliant invention. Now they're
    held by big corporates, and often extended beyond the lifetime of the product."
     
  14. Marc

    Marc Guest

    j-p.s <[email protected]> wrote:

    > ) Why rightly too? I am a taxpayer, I have paid for the OS to create the ) information, why should
    > I have to pay them again to look at my ) information?
    >
    > The price of an OS map, or the two-CD set, is pretty small,

    I don't consider seven pounds per map small. Especially as I have already paid for it once. Compare
    the OS attitude with the US's where the maps are considered public domain.

    --
    Marc Tabards, banners and signs for fundraising events and charities
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Wed, 7 May 2003 09:05:04 +0100, Colin Blackburn scrawled: ) Memorymap, referred to elsewhere in
    > this thread, offers the whole of the ) country on 1:50,000 and are currently talking to the OS
    > about providing ) the 1:25,000 maps on CD. It costs a bit, mind.
    >
    > Therein lies the problem. I think in the short term I should just invest in paper-based OS
    > coverage of the surrounding counties rather than worrying about what's happening (geographically
    > speaking) in Cornwall.

    With the added benefit of the sheer pleasure of laying a map out and spending hours reading it.
    Until I get a fantastic quality flat screen around the size of my map cabinet paper maps will always
    have the edge.

    The one big benefit for me of the Memorymap system is the ability to print out small sections on
    A4 either for use alone or for making up a long thin route which would otherwise necessitate
    several maps.

    Colin
     
  16. Jose Marques

    Jose Marques Guest

    On Wed, 7 May 2003, marc wrote:

    > I don't consider seven pounds per map small. Especially as I have already paid for it once.
    > Compare the OS attitude with the US's where the maps are considered public domain.

    And if the complaints of US users on GPS newsgroups are anything to go by of rather patchy quality.
    You pays your money...

    --
    Jose Marques
     
  17. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Jose Marques <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > I don't consider seven pounds per map small. Especially as I have already paid for it once.
    > > Compare the OS attitude with the US's where the maps are considered public domain.
    >
    > And if the complaints of US users on GPS newsgroups are anything to go by of rather patchy
    > quality.

    It's a big country ...

    > You pays your money...

    ...and according to the OS you have pay again and again and again without making a choice

    --
    Marc Tabards, banners and signs for fundraising events and charities
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
  18. Albert Fish

    Albert Fish Guest

    "marc" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1ful7nt.ucv8c31sss4ueN%[email protected]...
    > Jose Marques <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > > I don't consider seven pounds per map small. Especially as I have already paid for it once.
    > > > Compare the OS attitude with the US's where the maps are considered public domain.
    > >
    > > And if the complaints of US users on GPS newsgroups are anything to go by of rather patchy
    > > quality.
    >
    > It's a big country ...

    it is indeed.

    > > You pays your money...
    >
    > ...and according to the OS you have pay again and again and again without making a choice

    an outrageous monopoly, no doubt about it.

    however, I use multimap and photoshop (or any free photo / graphics manipulation applications) to
    stitch saved multimap maps together, then run the map through a laminator. If you use an offsite
    (works) printer (or a friends works printer and get them to laminate them too) it's possible to
    produce, as I have, a whole sheaf of pocket sized, double sided / fold out route maps of any area I
    fancy having a ride to, around and back again for very little cost.

    Assuming you have a pc and access to the interweb, which you do, it's cheap as chips.

    Albert
     
  19. Marc

    Marc Guest

    albert fish <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > It's a big country ...
    >
    > it is indeed.
    >
    > > > You pays your money...
    > >
    > > ...and according to the OS you have pay again and again and again without making a choice
    >
    > an outrageous monopoly, no doubt about it.

    I have no problem with it being a monopoly. My only complaint is that the taxpayer paid to create
    the maps and then is charged again and again for using what they have already paid for.

    >
    > however, I use multimap and photoshop (or any free photo / graphics manipulation applications) to
    > stitch saved multimap maps together, then run the map through a laminator. If you use an offsite
    > (works) printer (or a friends works printer and get them to laminate them too) it's possible to
    > produce, as I have, a whole sheaf of pocket sized, double sided / fold out route maps of any area
    > I fancy having a ride to, around and back again for very little cost.
    >
    > Assuming you have a pc and access to the interweb, which you do, it's cheap as chips.

    But still breaches the copyright.

    -- Marc Tabards, banners and signs for fundraising events and charities
    http://www.jaceeprint.demon.co.uk/
     
  20. Albert Fish

    Albert Fish Guest

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