Maps

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Larry Schuldt, Jun 19, 2003.

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  1. I'm looking for some good cycling maps. I like the maps in the Rand McNally Gazeteers because
    they're of a nice size, have a lot of detail,and are of a good scale for cycling. The drawbacks are
    that they are bound into a book and they are printed on ordinary paper.

    Does anyone make similar loose maps printed on a waterproof stock?

    Thanks, larry
    --
    To reply by e-mail, be polite. Rudeness will get you nowhere.
     
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  2. > I'm looking for some good cycling maps. I like the maps in the Rand McNally Gazeteers because
    > they're of a nice size, have a lot of detail,and are of a good scale for cycling. The drawbacks
    > are that they are bound into a book and they are printed on ordinary paper.
    >
    > Does anyone make similar loose maps printed on a waterproof stock?
    >
    Many years ago, I had a conversation with a Rand mcNally Vice President about printing maps
    on tyveck (?sp). He didn't think there was a big enough market, and, I suspect, was not too
    enthusiastic about a bunch of indestructable maps being out there, spoiling the market for
    new copies.

    Here in Britain - different maps, same principle - atlases are often the way to go. tear out the
    pages you want. The page can then fold up small enough to fit in a pocket, or be bulldog clipped to
    your handlebars. For waterproofness, use a plastic bag.

    If tearing up a book revolts you, buy two copies, and keep the second for your bookcase, but a bunch
    of loose pages, beaten up, and covered in felt markered routes, can be nice to have in later years.

    Jeremy Parker
     
  3. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Jeremy Parker" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Here in Britain - different maps, same principle - atlases are often the way to go. tear out the
    > pages you want. The page can then fold up small enough to fit in a pocket, or be bulldog clipped
    > to your handlebars. For waterproofness, use a plastic bag.

    Buy the software & print your own.

    We have a local company that prints cycling-specific maps with the roads color-coded for "bike
    friendliness". These are a bargain, I don't mind paying the $5 every few years when the paper
    wears out.
     
  4. On Thu, 19 Jun 2003 15:44:34 +0000, Larry Schuldt wrote:

    > I'm looking for some good cycling maps. I like the maps in the Rand McNally Gazeteers because
    > they're of a nice size, have a lot of detail,and are of a good scale for cycling. The drawbacks
    > are that they are bound into a book and they are printed on ordinary paper.
    >
    > Does anyone make similar loose maps printed on a waterproof stock?

    Adventure Cycling does an excellent job with their tour routes. That works well if you are going
    their way, as I did a year ago. Their maps are pretty well waterproof.

    We in Philadelphia now have a gorgeous map put together by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater
    Philadelphia. It color-codes roads in about a 50-mile square area around the city based on
    bicycle-friendliness, and most of the recommendations agree with my experience. This is a great
    resource that they give away. Local clubs have been given huge stockpiles of the maps, and they are
    on their Web-site as pdf files. The paper maps a coated to be fairly durable in the wet.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | We have a record of conquest, colonization and expansion _`\(,_ | unequalled by any people
    in the Nineteenth Century. We are not (_)/ (_) | to be curbed now. --Henry Cabot Lodge, 1895
     
  5. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "JTHouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > >We have a local company that prints cycling-specific maps with the roads color-coded for "bike
    > >friendliness"
    >
    > Where are you? would you mind divulging the name of the firm, and how to contact??

    Unfortunately they only do Massachusetts (Connecticut is supposedly coming this year):
    http://www.bikemaps.com/index.htm#top
     
  6. H. M. Leary

    H. M. Leary Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    snip
    >
    > We in Philadelphia now have a gorgeous map put together by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater
    > Philadelphia. It color-codes roads in about a 50-mile square area around the city based on
    > bicycle-friendliness, and most of the recommendations agree with my experience. This is a great
    > resource that they give away. Local clubs have been given huge stockpiles of the maps, and they
    > are on their Web-site as pdf files. The paper maps a coated to be fairly durable in the wet.

    Not many cycle friendly roads on it, however.

    www.franklinmaps.com has maps available in .pdf format, and also sells a a laminated Five
    County Atlas.

    Good if you are in the Philadelphia area.

    BTW, David, thanks for Miller ³the killer² Road. I hope the rains have not washed out the Perkiomen
    Trail. Riding on Rt29 is a bitc....!

    and they say that we¹ll have fun here if we ever get to see the sun here!

    --
    ³Freedom Is a Light for Which Many Have Died in Darkness³

    - Tomb of the unknown - American Revolution
     
  7. Hal

    Hal Guest

    > I hope the rains have not washed out the Perkiomen Trail. Riding on Rt29 is a bitc....!
    >

    The Perkiomen Trail survived the flooding - mostly- The section from Green Lane Park south to the
    trailhead at Spring Mountain is fine, well above the flood waters, althought there was some suface
    water in a few places, the surface was ridable as of Sunday...

    South of Spring Mountain Village, it seems that most people don't know that the trail continues -
    when you reach Spring Mountain Village trailhead, you go out to the road and left, over the stone
    bridge, and then an immediate right onto a new trail that runs along the base of Spring Mountain,
    then UP Spring Mountain to Cedar Road, and then down to Schwenksville/Game Farm Road. So, with that
    new section you only have to ride on Route 29 for about .75 miles now, and that is only through
    Schwenksville, where nobody uses the sidewalks anyway.

    Bad news is that the lowest points of the Spring Mountain to Cedar avenue route has quite a few
    small washouts, but only 2 are bad - one is a DEEP & WIDE gully near the stone bridge at the base
    of the ski slope, second is a DEEP & narrow gully at the base of the big downhill coming from
    Cedar Avenue. There are a few 'dunes' where the water running over the trail has stripped the top
    riding surface off and exposed the sub-base and dumped them in a lobed pile, but otherwise, not
    bad at all....

    To stay off route 29, going north, follow the Perkiomen Trail to the Hollywood Road access, take the
    exit onto Perkimen Creek Road, go left to Route 73 which has wide shoulders, then across the Bridge
    and right into Schwenksville - and then at the end of Schwenksville, there's an unofficial 'bypass'
    where local kids have maintained a well worn path along the Perkiomen RR right of way that runs just
    below Route 29- you get to that trail by dodging the trash dumpster at the little pizziera at the
    north end of Schwenksville. There's a nasty gully that the local kids have provided a 2 x 6 board to
    cross, then the path rises up to road level just before the new Moccia's Train Stop- then it's a
    short distance to Spring Mountain Road and then follow that to the Perkiomen Trailhead in Spring
    Mountain Village. - Thats a route that trades a few short sharp hills for a medium hard climb up the
    flank of Spring Mountain...

    Hal
     
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