Marble eggs

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Bob (this one), Apr 17, 2005.

  1. Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice water
    until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups. Rolled them
    gently on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put them into
    3 different coloring solutions overnight.
    1) tea
    2) beet juice
    3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)

    Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them and
    rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided each
    group in half and put them into different color solutions. So 6 eggs
    done with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the basil, etc..

    Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like pieces
    of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from exotic rocks.
    Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a friend's house for a
    party. Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips - mostly variations
    on salad dressings - for the eggs. Good food.

    They really did look cool.

    Pastorio
     
    Tags:


  2. Bob

    Bob Guest

    Bob Pastorio wrote:

    > Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice water until
    > cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups. Rolled them gently
    > on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put them into 3
    > different coloring solutions overnight.
    > 1) tea
    > 2) beet juice
    > 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)
    >
    > Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them and
    > rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided each
    > group in half and put them into different color solutions. So 6 eggs done
    > with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the basil, etc..
    >
    > Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    > solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like pieces
    > of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from exotic rocks.
    > Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a friend's house for a party.
    > Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips - mostly variations on salad
    > dressings - for the eggs. Good food.
    >
    > They really did look cool.


    That *is* cool! I make marbled tea eggs every once in a while, although I
    spice the tea up with cinnamon, cloves, and star anise. I think I got the
    recipe out of the Craig Claiborne and Virginia Lee book on Chinese cooking.
    I never thought of making marble eggs with beet juice, although I love eggs
    pickled in the juice from pickled beets. And the basil puree: What color
    did the marbling take? I'm thinking of how basil turns dark so easily,
    which makes me curious as to how much green was retained by that
    preparation.

    The "only slight flavor effects" observation is rather disappointing to me,
    and now I'll have to check the amount of time that I steep the tea eggs. In
    the eggs I make, you can definitely taste the tea and spices, so maybe I
    just steep them longer than you did, or maybe my steeping solution has a
    stronger flavor -- but I can't believe that my steeping solution has a
    stronger flavor than BEET JUICE, so the stronger flavor is probably a result
    of a longer steeping time.

    Something else for me to look up when I get home...

    Bob
     
  3. In article <[email protected]>, "Bob (this one)"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice water
    > until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups. Rolled them
    > gently on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put them into
    > 3 different coloring solutions overnight.
    > 1) tea
    > 2) beet juice
    > 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)
    >
    > Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them and
    > rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided each
    > group in half and put them into different color solutions. So 6 eggs
    > done with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the basil, etc..
    >
    > Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    > solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like pieces
    > of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from exotic rocks.
    > Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a friend's house for a
    > party. Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips - mostly variations
    > on salad dressings - for the eggs. Good food.
    >
    > They really did look cool.
    >
    > Pastorio


    So, where are the pictures? Don't you think you ought to be
    photographing these things for us, Bucko? I'd put 'em on my site (I
    can't access binary groups where they post the food porn.) I'll bet
    they were cool!
    --
    -Barb, <http://www.jamlady.eboard.com> Cam Ranh Bay food added 4-8-05.
    Sam I Am! updated 4-9-05.
    "I read recipes the way I read science fiction: I get to the end and
    say,'Well, that's not going to happen.'" - Comedian Rita Rudner,
    performance at New York, New York, January 10, 2005.
     
  4. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    Bob <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bob Pastorio wrote:
    > > Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them
    > > in ice water until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them
    > > into 3 groups. Rolled them gently on the countertop to
    > > crack the shells slightly and put them into 3 different
    > > coloring solutions overnight.
    > > 1) tea
    > > 2) beet juice
    > > 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)

    ==> Lather, Rinse, Repeat swapping eggs to new soak <==
    > > They really did look cool.

    >
    > That *is* cool! I make marbled tea eggs every once in a while,
    > although I spice the tea up with cinnamon, cloves, and star anise.

    [snip]
    > The "only slight flavor effects" observation is rather disappointing
    > to me, and now I'll have to check the amount of time that I steep
    > the tea eggs. In the eggs I make, you can definitely taste the tea
    > and spices, so maybe I just steep them longer than you did, or
    > maybe my steeping solution has a stronger flavor -- but I can't
    > believe that my steeping solution has a stronger flavor than BEET
    > JUICE, so the stronger flavor is probably a result of a longer
    > steeping time.


    I'm with you, Bob (not this one), on the flavor being less subtle than Bob
    (this one) posted about. I'd be curious why his eggs didn't latch onto the
    different flavors he used.

    My marble eggs (black tea, pickled peppers [usually jalapeno], and beet are
    my crew's favorite flavors) are not subtle in grapping whatever flavor
    they're soaked in.

    The Ranger
     
  5. sf

    sf Guest

    Did you serve them whole or halved? If they were halved, did you put
    anything on top?

    ````````````````````

    On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 03:44:46 -0400, Bob (this one) wrote:

    > Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice water
    > until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups. Rolled them
    > gently on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put them into
    > 3 different coloring solutions overnight.
    > 1) tea
    > 2) beet juice
    > 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)
    >
    > Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them and
    > rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided each
    > group in half and put them into different color solutions. So 6 eggs
    > done with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the basil, etc..
    >
    > Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    > solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like pieces
    > of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from exotic rocks.
    > Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a friend's house for a
    > party. Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips - mostly variations
    > on salad dressings - for the eggs. Good food.
    >
    > They really did look cool.
    >
    > Pastorio
     
  6. The Ranger wrote:
    > Bob <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Bob Pastorio wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them
    >>>in ice water until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them
    >>>into 3 groups. Rolled them gently on the countertop to
    >>>crack the shells slightly and put them into 3 different
    >>>coloring solutions overnight.


    Did them late in the evening. Took them out in the morning. Let them sit
    in the fridge until evening before putting into the other color. Out
    again the next morning.

    >>>1) tea
    >>>2) beet juice
    >>>3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)

    >
    > ==> Lather, Rinse, Repeat swapping eggs to new soak <==


    No lather. Just water.

    >>>They really did look cool.

    >>
    >>That *is* cool! I make marbled tea eggs every once in a while,
    >>although I spice the tea up with cinnamon, cloves, and star anise.

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    >>The "only slight flavor effects" observation is rather disappointing
    >>to me, and now I'll have to check the amount of time that I steep
    >>the tea eggs. In the eggs I make, you can definitely taste the tea
    >>and spices, so maybe I just steep them longer than you did, or
    >>maybe my steeping solution has a stronger flavor -- but I can't
    >>believe that my steeping solution has a stronger flavor than BEET
    >>JUICE, so the stronger flavor is probably a result of a longer
    >>steeping time.

    >
    >
    > I'm with you, Bob (not this one), on the flavor being less subtle than Bob
    > (this one) posted about. I'd be curious why his eggs didn't latch onto the
    > different flavors he used.


    Average time in solutions about 12 hours, not a lot of cracking first
    time around, not really a lot second time, either, no extra seasoning to
    strengthen flavors, solutions diluted. I mixed the beet juice 50-50 with
    water to get a lighter color. Given that I was adding layers of color, I
    didn't want any of them to be so intense that they'd overwhelm the
    others. This was more about color than flavor since I made dips to the
    eggs to be eaten with.

    The flavors were lighter compared to beet-pickled eggs or other eggs
    that I've done with the intent to actually add new flavors to them. But
    then, I leave them in whatever solution a couple days before eating.

    The basil stays green when pureed and mixed with the vinegar. It is the
    strongest flavoring of the bunch.

    > My marble eggs (black tea, pickled peppers [usually jalapeno], and beet are
    > my crew's favorite flavors) are not subtle in grapping whatever flavor
    > they're soaked in.


    A longer soak would certainly give stronger flavors. But I don't want
    the colors to end up muddy at the expense of more flavor.

    What do yours look like? Do you do multiple solutions for each egg like
    I described?

    Pastorio
     
  7. sf wrote:

    > Did you serve them whole or halved? If they were halved, did you put
    > anything on top?


    Piled them whole in a bowl. Looked like a display you'd see in some
    antique store. Eggs carved from marble and other stones. Small bowls of
    dips around it. One time in the past, I wanted them to shine, so I
    sprayed some with Pam to see if it would work. Don't do that. You can't
    pick them up very securely and they squirt out of your greasy fingers
    onto the floor and immediately disintegrate deeply into your leftover
    70's shag rug. Aspic was even worse. They stuck to my fingers and to
    each other after a few minutes at room temp. Now, I serve them not shiny
    and they still get eaten.

    I've played with them in the past with cutting and filling. Once, I
    split them lengthwise, took out the yolks like everybody does, then got
    crazy. Mixed yolk with a little drained sour cream and a bunch of
    caviar. Did some with red eggs and some with black (cheap stuff, not
    sturgeon). Filled one half so that when I put the top on (the other
    half) it would sit like an oyster shell, closed at one end; wide open at
    the other). Smoothed the filling so it was even with the edges and
    dipped/rolled it into caviar so it would stick. Marble eggs that looked
    like some unearthly bivalve that seemed to be leaking caviar. What's not
    to like...? Pain to do. Labor intensive getting them pretty.

    Pastorio
     
  8. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    Bob (this one) <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > The Ranger wrote:
    > > I'm with you, Bob (not this one), on the flavor being less
    > > subtle than Bob (this one) posted about. I'd be curious
    > > why his eggs didn't latch onto the different flavors he used.
    > >

    > Average time in solutions about 12 hours, not a lot of
    > cracking first time around, not really a lot second time,
    > either, no extra seasoning to strengthen flavors, solutions
    > diluted. I mixed the beet juice 50-50 with water to get
    > a lighter color. Given that I was adding layers of color,
    > I didn't want any of them to be so intense that they'd
    > overwhelm the others. This was more about color than
    > flavor since I made dips to the eggs to be eaten with.


    Okay; I missed that you cut the soak-solution. I'm a little less subtle when
    I make them. I like pickled eggs; just can't get enough of them but
    understand why others would want a less in-your-face taste (especially where
    sauces are the attraction after the eye-candy feast.)

    [snip]
    > > My marble eggs (black tea, pickled peppers [usually
    > > jalapeno], and beet are my crew's favorite flavors)
    > > are not subtle in grabbing whatever flavor they're
    > > soaked in.
    > >

    > A longer soak would certainly give stronger flavors. But
    > I don't want the colors to end up muddy at the expense
    > of more flavor.
    >
    > What do yours look like? Do you do multiple solutions
    > for each egg like I described?


    The beet juice are purple, almost a royal purple. The jalapeno eggs are
    generally red/pink (I add red dye to warn people of pending heat.) The tea
    eggs are dark gray (charcoal) to light gray. I don't double-crack them;
    never thought of that. Thanks for the idea. I'm off to give it a try
    tonight.

    The Ranger
     
  9. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    The Ranger wrote:
    >
    > Bob <[email protected]_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Bob Pastorio wrote:
    > > > Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them
    > > > in ice water until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them
    > > > into 3 groups. Rolled them gently on the countertop to
    > > > crack the shells slightly and put them into 3 different
    > > > coloring solutions overnight.
    > > > 1) tea
    > > > 2) beet juice
    > > > 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)

    > ==> Lather, Rinse, Repeat swapping eggs to new soak <==
    > > > They really did look cool.

    > >
    > > That *is* cool! I make marbled tea eggs every once in a while,
    > > although I spice the tea up with cinnamon, cloves, and star anise.

    > [snip]
    > > The "only slight flavor effects" observation is rather disappointing
    > > to me, and now I'll have to check the amount of time that I steep
    > > the tea eggs. In the eggs I make, you can definitely taste the tea
    > > and spices, so maybe I just steep them longer than you did, or
    > > maybe my steeping solution has a stronger flavor -- but I can't
    > > believe that my steeping solution has a stronger flavor than BEET
    > > JUICE, so the stronger flavor is probably a result of a longer
    > > steeping time.

    >
    > I'm with you, Bob (not this one), on the flavor being less subtle than Bob
    > (this one) posted about. I'd be curious why his eggs didn't latch onto the
    > different flavors he used.
    >
    > My marble eggs (black tea, pickled peppers [usually jalapeno], and beet are
    > my crew's favorite flavors) are not subtle in grapping whatever flavor
    > they're soaked in.
    >
    > The Ranger


    When I make Chinese-type tea eggs, the eggs are *simmered* at low temp
    in the tea/spice solution. The eggs always have a strong taste of the
    tea.
     
  10. The Ranger

    The Ranger Guest

    Arri London <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    [snip]
    > When I make Chinese-type tea eggs, the eggs are
    > *simmered* at low temp in the tea/spice solution.
    > The eggs always have a strong taste of the tea.


    My Sainted Mother(tm)'s recipe doesn't mention simmering the eggs; it's a
    straight soaking, like you would color eggs at Easter.

    I can well-imagine the strength of flavors from simmering the eggs in a tea
    solution, though.

    The Ranger
    ==
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving
    safely, in an attractive and well-preserved body. Rather one should skid in
    sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used
    up, totally worn out while screaming 'WOO HOO! What a ride!'"
     
  11. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 16:31:17 -0400, Bob (this one) wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >
    > > Did you serve them whole or halved? If they were halved, did you put
    > > anything on top?

    >
    > Piled them whole in a bowl. Looked like a display you'd see in some
    > antique store. Eggs carved from marble and other stones. Small bowls of
    > dips around it.


    Very pretty! I've never thought of "dipping" hardboiled eggs in
    anything... what did you serve?

    <snipped some funny stuff>
    > Marble eggs that looked
    > like some unearthly bivalve that seemed to be leaking caviar.
    >

    LOL! That mental image is too funny!

    > What's not to like...? Pain to do. Labor intensive getting them pretty.
     
  12. On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 17:45:58 -0700, The Ranger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Arri London <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > [snip]
    >> When I make Chinese-type tea eggs, the eggs are
    >> *simmered* at low temp in the tea/spice solution.
    >> The eggs always have a strong taste of the tea.

    >
    > My Sainted Mother(tm)'s recipe doesn't mention simmering the eggs; it's a
    > straight soaking, like you would color eggs at Easter.
    >
    > I can well-imagine the strength of flavors from simmering the eggs in a tea
    > solution, though.


    The recipe I use calls for simmering for 3 hours, then turning the heat off
    and steeping it in the cooking liquids for another 8 hours minimum. (up to 1
    1/2 days.) I did wonder if that was excessive at the time, but the results
    taste good to me. Haven't made them for ages, though...

    Ariane
    --
    Dysfunction: The only consistent feature of all your dissatisfying
    relationships is you.
    http://www.despair.com/demotivators/dysfunction.html
     
  13. sf wrote:

    > On Sun, 17 Apr 2005 16:31:17 -0400, Bob (this one) wrote:
    >
    >> sf wrote:
    >>
    >> > Did you serve them whole or halved? If they were halved, did you put
    >> > anything on top?

    >>
    >> Piled them whole in a bowl. Looked like a display you'd see in some
    >> antique store. Eggs carved from marble and other stones. Small bowls of
    >> dips around it.

    >
    >
    > Very pretty! I've never thought of "dipping" hardboiled eggs in
    > anything... what did you serve?


    Green Goddess dressing; Russian dressing; blue cheese dressing (crumbled
    blue cheese mixed with drained whipped cream and chilled overnight -
    decadent); mayo with parmesan, lemon juice and minced caramelized onion;
    hoisin sauce thinned with chardonnay.

    > <snipped some funny stuff>
    >
    >>Marble eggs that looked
    >> like some unearthly bivalve that seemed to be leaking caviar.

    >
    > LOL! That mental image is too funny!


    And a few people asked a lot of questions before eating them. <g>

    Pastorio
     
  14. Arri London

    Arri London Guest

    The Ranger wrote:
    >
    > Arri London <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > [snip]
    > > When I make Chinese-type tea eggs, the eggs are
    > > *simmered* at low temp in the tea/spice solution.
    > > The eggs always have a strong taste of the tea.

    >
    > My Sainted Mother(tm)'s recipe doesn't mention simmering the eggs; it's a
    > straight soaking, like you would color eggs at Easter.
    >
    > I can well-imagine the strength of flavors from simmering the eggs in a tea
    > solution, though.
    >
    > The Ranger
    >

    Should have mentioned they are then left in the liquid to cool. That's
    how my Chinese friends prepared the eggs.

    LOL we always simmered the eggs when colouring them for Easter; that's
    using the food colours,not the kits.
     
  15. sueb

    sueb Guest

    Bob (this one) wrote:
    > Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice water
    > until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups. Rolled

    them
    > gently on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put them

    into
    > 3 different coloring solutions overnight.
    > 1) tea
    > 2) beet juice
    > 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)
    >
    > Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them and


    > rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided

    each
    > group in half and put them into different color solutions. So 6 eggs
    > done with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the basil,

    etc..
    >
    > Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    > solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like

    pieces
    > of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from exotic

    rocks.
    > Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a friend's house for a
    > party. Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips - mostly

    variations
    > on salad dressings - for the eggs. Good food.
    >


    It sounds nifty. How did you serve them? Whole, cut in half, like
    deviled eggs? I can't imagine dipping a hard boiled egg....

    Susan B.
     
  16. On Mon 18 Apr 2005 03:57:05p, sueb wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > Bob (this one) wrote:
    >> Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice water
    >> until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups. Rolled
    >> them gently on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put
    >> them into 3 different coloring solutions overnight.
    >> 1) tea
    >> 2) beet juice
    >> 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)
    >>
    >> Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them and

    >
    >> rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided
    >> each group in half and put them into different color solutions. So 6
    >> eggs done with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the basil,
    >> etc..
    >>
    >> Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    >> solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like
    >> pieces of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from
    >> exotic rocks. Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a friend's
    >> house for a party. Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips -
    >> mostly variations on salad dressings - for the eggs. Good food.
    >>

    >
    > It sounds nifty. How did you serve them? Whole, cut in half, like
    > deviled eggs? I can't imagine dipping a hard boiled egg....
    >
    > Susan B.
    >


    If he served them with dips, what else would you do?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  17. sueb

    sueb Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Mon 18 Apr 2005 03:57:05p, sueb wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > >
    > > Bob (this one) wrote:
    > >> Hard-cooked 36 eggs day before yesterday. Chilled them in ice

    water
    > >> until cold (like 20 minutes) and divided them into 3 groups.

    Rolled
    > >> them gently on the countertop to crack the shells slightly and put
    > >> them into 3 different coloring solutions overnight.
    > >> 1) tea
    > >> 2) beet juice
    > >> 3) puree of basil (thinned with rice vinegar)
    > >>
    > >> Yesterday, I took them out of the coloring solutions, rinsed them

    and
    > >
    > >> rolled them on the counter to crack the shells a bit more. Divided
    > >> each group in half and put them into different color solutions. So

    6
    > >> eggs done with tea went into the beet juice and 6 went into the

    basil,
    > >> etc..
    > >>
    > >> Switched them all that way. Today, took them out of the coloring
    > >> solutions, rinsed them and peeled the whole bunch. They look like
    > >> pieces of marble. Grained and veined like egg-shapes carved from
    > >> exotic rocks. Only slight flavor effects. Brought them to a

    friend's
    > >> house for a party. Maybe 20 people. Eggs all gone. Did some dips -
    > >> mostly variations on salad dressings - for the eggs. Good food.
    > >>

    > >
    > > It sounds nifty. How did you serve them? Whole, cut in half, like
    > > deviled eggs? I can't imagine dipping a hard boiled egg....
    > >
    > > Susan B.
    > >

    >
    > If he served them with dips, what else would you do?
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    >


    I would put salt on it and eat it. I don't think dipping a hard boiled
    egg into salad dressing sounds very appetizing. A peeled egg is pretty
    slippery too.

    Susan B.
     
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