Marinated chicken



G

Gary Wachs

Guest
I just can't figure out how to cook marinated chicken.

I've tried a few times and it never tastes right. It doesn't seem like the marinate has soaked into
the chicken at all, that it's just a coating.

Could someone give me a step-by-step recipe for a very very very simply basic easy marinated chicken
recipe, either cooktop or oven is fine.

Thanks.
 
T

The Ranger

Guest
Gary Wachs <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> I just can't figure out how to cook marinated chicken.
>
> I've tried a few times and it never tastes right. It doesn't seem like the marinate has soaked
> into the chicken at all, that it's just a coating.
>
> Could someone give me a step-by-step recipe for a very very very simply basic easy marinated
> chicken recipe, either cooktop or oven is fine.

Easiest: Buy one bottle Wishbone Italian. Put four chicken breasts in a Ziploc(tm) freezer storage
bag. Shake bottle and pour ingredients into bag with chicken breasts. Seal. Shake bag to cover
chicken. Repeat process every four hours. Let chicken soak overnight [in fridge.] Bake or fry up at
next meal.

Less easy but delicious: Combine 1/2 cup Lite Soy Sauce (Kikomann) with 1 tsp. crushed ginger, 1
tsp. crushed garlic in mixing cup. In a Ziploc freezer storage bag, place four chicken breasts, pour
marinade over chicken and seal bag. Shake bag to cover chicken. Repeat process every four hours. Let
chicken soak overnight [in fridge.] Bake or fry up at next meal.

The Ranger
 
D

Dave Smith

Guest
Gary Wachs wrote:

> I just can't figure out how to cook marinated chicken.
>
> I've tried a few times and it never tastes right. It doesn't seem like the marinate has soaked
> into the chicken at all, that it's just a coating.
>
> Could someone give me a step-by-step recipe for a very very very simply basic easy marinated
> chicken recipe, either cooktop or oven is fine.

It depends on the marinade. I make up a mixture of olive oil and lemon juice with garlic, salt
pepper and herbs, usually oregano that I use for grilling or bbqing skinless chicken breasts. I
usually let it marinade for a few hours before grilling.

I also like to use a Tandoori marinade made with tandoori powder, oil, lemon juice and yoghurt. It
is best to use boneless chicken pieces and to pierce the meat to the bone to get the marinade right
into the pieces. The chicken can be marinated overnight. Wipe off the excess marinade and bake or
grill quickly on high high heat. The marinade not only gives the chicken great flavour, but it also
tenderizes it.
 
C

Christine

Guest
How long are you letting the chicken sit in the marinade? Overnight is best if you really want the
flavor to penetrate.

"Gary Wachs" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> I just can't figure out how to cook marinated chicken.
>
> I've tried a few times and it never tastes right. It doesn't seem like the marinate has soaked
> into the chicken at all, that it's just a coating.
>
> Could someone give me a step-by-step recipe for a very very very simply basic easy marinated
> chicken recipe, either cooktop or oven is fine.
>
> Thanks.
 
F

Frogleg

Guest
On Mon, 26 Jan 2004 17:02:20 -0800, "Gary Wachs" <[email protected]> wrote:

>I just can't figure out how to cook marinated chicken.
>
>I've tried a few times and it never tastes right. It doesn't seem like the marinate has soaked into
>the chicken at all, that it's just a coating.
>
>Could someone give me a step-by-step recipe for a very very very simply basic easy marinated
>chicken recipe, either cooktop or oven is fine.

Marinades *don't* soak very far into meat. Perhaps a little further than a "coating", but not to the
interior. Hence gadgetry to "inject" marinades. (Think of slits cut into lamb roast and garlic
inserted). Often the marinade or 'drippings' are used to make a sauce, which reinforces the
flavorings when the dish is eaten. You might get more mileage by marinating strips or chunks rather
than larger pieces.
 
D

Daisy

Guest
Chicken is probably the most bland meat (apart from turkey) that a cook will ever encounter! I have
tried and tried to get some flavour injected into this awful white meat stuff, and have now resorted
mainly to curries - or any other Indian or Thai treatment of this bird.

I use butter chicken recipes, tandoori and Thai red curry chicken recipes and totally give away
anything else. Maybe you can marinate the stuff overnight shaking around the marinade every 4 hours
or so, but what a bore!

One thing that works okay if you don't mind the chicken a tad dry is the following:

One (ore more) chicken breasts with or without skin. Chicken stock. Lemon juice Salt and pepper Bay
leaves and/or other fresh herbs (i.e. tarragon).

Put the chicken breasts in a pot that will contain them snugly. Pour over chicken stock to cover.
Add sufficient lemon juice for the number of chicken breasts (1 tbsp per breast is about right).
Salt and pepper, a couple of bay leaves and a sprinkling of fresh herbs.

Bring to the boil and then cover tightly and turn off the heat. Leave for a minimum of one and a
half hours.

The chicken will be cooked don't worry providing you leave the chicken to cool in the liquid, remove
and then you can slice finely for salads
- or whatever you want to use the poached chicken for.

I have used this recipe a number of times. It doesn't dry out the chicken as much as most other
recipes do, but is not exactly perfect for all that. It is fine in summer as a salad topping - and
you can spread sauce or mayonnaise on as well.

Daisy.

Don't assume malice for what stupidity can explain.
 
L

Loki

Guest
il Wed, 28 Jan 2004 18:31:05 +1300, Daisy ha scritto:

> Chicken is probably the most bland meat (apart from turkey) that a cook will ever encounter! I
> have tried and tried to get some flavour injected into this awful white meat stuff, and have now
> resorted mainly to curries - or any other Indian or Thai treatment of this bird.
>
> I use butter chicken recipes, tandoori and Thai red curry chicken recipes and totally give away
> anything else. Maybe you can marinate the stuff overnight shaking around the marinade every 4
> hours or so, but what a bore!

I eat chicken a lot and recently I've been patting sumac onto chicken breasts and cooking that. The
sumac seems to keep it moist as well as giving a nice lemony flavour, and pink colour. Otherwise I
go the tandoori way. Right now I have a piece in the fridge coated in tandoori paste and crushed
garlic (ran out of yoghurt). Tastes great when fried up.

--
Cheers, Loki [ Brevity is the soul of wit. W.Shakespeare ]