Marinoni road bike - is this a good deal?



raelynn

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Jun 15, 2013
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I've been searching online and can't seem to find much that can help me date this bike or whether it's a good deal. It's being sold by a younger woman who can no longer ride due to back issues. She just bought the bike a year ago from someone who had several expensive road bikes and who took great care of it.

This is what I know about it:
- Piuma model
- Columbia Genius Tubing
- carbon front fork
- full Shimano Ultegra group
- new tires, just tuned up

They want $750 for it. Is this a good deal? Will I be able to find parts for it if I ever need to? Any and all input is appreciated :)









 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Here is the link to the Marinoni page on Classic Rendezvous. http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Canada/Marinoni_G.htm. One of my buddies raced on a Marinoni in the '70s and early '80s.

While I'm an ardent admirer of Marinoni's work, I have some reservations about this bike at this price. The steel tubing is Columbus Genius, a mid-level butted steel. The geometry is aggressive, even by race bike standards--steep head and seat angles, very short chain stays, and a high bottom bracket for pedaling through corners. This points to a demanding ride and handling, the sort of thing a 20-something category 5 criterium racer who was trying to upgrade would have been into.

The 9-speed Ultegra drivetrain indicates the bike is 10-20 years old. Ultegra has since migrated to 10-speed, and will soon be migrating to 11-speed. If the costly control levers (brake and shifter) go, replacements will be found in low-end Sora, the used parts market, or a costly upgrade to the newer 10-speed drivetrain.

The frame is large. If this is how the bike is being ridden, it's clearly too large for its current owner. This size is about right for 5'11" to about 6'2".

Road bike technology has evolved immensely since the early '90s. If this bike were older it would be considered somewhat classic, but at this vintage it's mostly just dated. Maybe I'd be interested in it as a second bike, definitely not for long distance riding, and for about $200 less than the asking price.
 

raelynn

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Jun 15, 2013
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Originally Posted by oldbobcat .

Here is the link to the Marinoni page on Classic Rendezvous. http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Canada/Marinoni_G.htm. One of my buddies raced on a Marinoni in the '70s and early '80s.

While I'm an ardent admirer of Marinoni's work, I have some reservations about this bike at this price. The steel tubing is Columbus Genius, a mid-level butted steel. The geometry is aggressive, even by race bike standards--steep head and seat angles, very short chain stays, and a high bottom bracket for pedaling through corners. This points to a demanding ride and handling, the sort of thing a 20-something category 5 criterium racer who was trying to upgrade would have been into.

The 9-speed Ultegra drivetrain indicates the bike is 10-20 years old. Ultegra has since migrated to 10-speed, and will soon be migrating to 11-speed. If the costly control levers (brake and shifter) go, replacements will be found in low-end Sora, the used parts market, or a costly upgrade to the newer 10-speed drivetrain.

The frame is large. If this is how the bike is being ridden, it's clearly too large for its current owner. This size is about right for 5'11" to about 6'2".

Road bike technology has evolved immensely since the early '90s. If this bike were older it would be considered somewhat classic, but at this vintage it's mostly just dated. Maybe I'd be interested in it as a second bike, definitely not for long distance riding, and for about $200 less than the asking price.
[COLOR= rgb(51, 51, 51)]Thank you for replying! I backed out of going to see the bike. I plan to go to the LBS and find something new, that fits properly and I'll be happy with. After all the reading I've done, it just isn't worth buying a poorly fitting second-hand bike to save a few dollars. [/COLOR]
 

cyclintom

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Jan 15, 2011
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A plastic bike is probably better in the north where it rains and snows. As Raelynn pointed out, unless you're a mechanic buying the older vintage components is always a bad idea..

On the other hand, there really is no reason for anyone but an avid racer to have any more speeds than 8. That's where practicality peaked and manufacturers began making groups to wear out rather than perform better.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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cyclintom said:
A plastic bike is probably better in the north where it rains and snows. As Raelynn pointed out, unless you're a mechanic buying the older vintage components is always a bad idea.. On the other hand, there really is no reason for anyone but an avid racer to have any more speeds than 8. That's where practicality peaked and manufacturers began making groups to wear out rather than perform better.
Wow. There's a lot of wrongness in that post and dollop of myth. No one needs more "speeds" than 5.....no wait, maybe it's 6.........no, only 1. No one needs more than one gear. The pronouncements about how many gears anyone needs are ridiculous.
 

ambal

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Oct 15, 2010
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Originally Posted by cyclintom .

On the other hand, there really is no reason for anyone but an avid racer to have any more speeds than 8. That's where practicality peaked and manufacturers began making groups to wear out rather than perform better.
In winter I ride a plastic single speed bike, beats your fancy 8 speeds any day.
 

cyclintom

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Jan 15, 2011
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Originally Posted by alienator .


Wow. There's a lot of wrongness in that post and dollop of myth.

No one needs more "speeds" than 5.....no wait, maybe it's 6.........no, only 1. No one needs more than one gear. The pronouncements about how many gears anyone needs are ridiculous.
Since I've been riding for 35+ years and I presently have a steel Paramount, Masi and Eddy Merckx Corsa OS, A Look Tour Replica, A Time VX and a Colnago C40. They have 7, 8, 9 and 10 speeds. A normal ride for me is 40+miles and 3000 feet or more of climbing and I put in over 6,000 miles a year. Perhaps you ought to tell me all of your experience to be able to criticize my opinions.
 

cyclintom

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Jan 15, 2011
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Originally Posted by ambal .


In winter I ride a plastic single speed bike, beats your fancy 8 speeds any day.
That's cool but you can't climb that way.
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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cyclintom said:
That's cool but you can't climb that way.
Really? Have you never read about the early Tours de France and other races of those times?
 

alienator

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Jun 10, 2004
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cyclintom said:
Since I've been riding for 35+ years and I presently have a steel Paramount, Masi and Eddy Merckx Corsa OS, A Look Tour Replica, A Time VX and a Colnago C40. They have 7, 8, 9 and 10 speeds. A normal ride for me is 40+miles and 3000 feet or more of climbing and I put in over 6,000 miles a year. Perhaps you ought to tell me all of your experience to be able to criticize my opinions.
I don't need to, and it's irrelevant, especially as your claims are just that. Your opinions, however, are not fact, and as such your statement about how many gears might be needed by anyone is completely without merit. A person determines their own gearing needs. Feel free to continue your oral masturbation about your bikes and your vast experience, though.
 

cyclintom

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Jan 15, 2011
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Originally Posted by alienator .


I don't need to, and it's irrelevant, especially as your claims are just that. Your opinions, however, are not fact, and as such your statement about how many gears might be needed by anyone is completely without merit. A person determines their own gearing needs. Feel free to continue your oral masturbation about your bikes and your vast experience, though.
I've got you. "Wahhhaaaahhaaaaaa, I don't like you."
 

cale262

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May 14, 2012
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I would say it's a good deal...not a great deal....but it's no deal at all if it doesn't fit you correctly.


...and a nice steel ride is no issue in Edmonton. I have a nice steel Marinoni that I bought in the late 90's, it hasn't rusted away do to our harsh climate in fact it still looks and rides like new/img/vbsmilies/smilies/icon14.gif
 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Originally Posted by raelynn .


[COLOR= rgb(51, 51, 51)]Thank you for replying! I backed out of going to see the bike. I plan to go to the LBS and find something new, that fits properly and I'll be happy with. After all the reading I've done, it just isn't worth buying a poorly fitting second-hand bike to save a few dollars. [/COLOR]
Smart choice, raelynn. A good shop and and good entry- to mid-level modern bike that fits are most helpful to anyone just getting started. Best of luck to you.
 

oldbobcat

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Aug 31, 2003
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Originally Posted by cale262 .

I would say it's a good deal...not a great deal....but it's no deal at all if it doesn't fit you correctly.


...and a nice steel ride is no issue in Edmonton. I have a nice steel Marinoni that I bought in the late 90's, it hasn't rusted away do to our harsh climate in fact it still looks and rides like new/img/vbsmilies/smilies/icon14.gif
And I love my steel Masi and Frejus, but frankly, I was very lucky to come upon these old bikes that fit me perfectly.
 

cale262

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May 14, 2012
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Being that your in Edmonton, I'd highly recommend stopping in and seeing Guri @ PRW They specialize in road bikes and fittings, also one of the top ten coolest bike shops in the world according to these Australians .../img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif