Marketing of BP medication?

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by eki, Nov 8, 2003.

  1. eki

    eki Guest

    This is next to disgusting, BP medication marketed
    almost like some recreational drugs:

    http://tinyurl.com/u6xm
     
    Tags:


  2. Complex592

    Complex592 Guest

    I am not sure what you find objectionable about consumer information and
    awareness. This website was doing nothing that to bring awareness of their
    product to those who might benefit or be a possible consumer of the product.
    The are targeting an audience just like any other advertising program. I find
    that much less objectionable than the Viagra flags and commercials during the
    world series. Six year olds were asking "whats Viagra?" The web site just
    seeks to inform and prompt a patient to ask the Dr. Is this right for me?
     
  3. eki

    eki Guest

    On 08 Nov 2003 16:56:56 GMT, [email protected] (Complex592) wrote:

    >I am not sure what you find objectionable about consumer information and
    >awareness. This website was doing nothing that to bring awareness of their
    >product to those who might benefit or be a possible consumer of the product.
    >The are targeting an audience just like any other advertising program. I find
    >that much less objectionable than the Viagra flags and commercials during the
    >world series. Six year olds were asking "whats Viagra?" The web site just
    >seeks to inform and prompt a patient to ask the Dr. Is this right for me?
    >


    I meant this:

    Get a free trial offer for LOTREL

    Seems like Novartis wants mainly poor people for guinea-pigs...
     
  4. On Sat, 08 Nov 2003 18:04:27 GMT, eki <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 08 Nov 2003 16:56:56 GMT, [email protected] (Complex592) wrote:
    >
    >> I am not sure what you find objectionable about consumer information and
    >> awareness. This website was doing nothing that to bring awareness of
    >> their
    >> product to those who might benefit or be a possible consumer of the
    >> product.
    >> The are targeting an audience just like any other advertising program.
    >> I find
    >> that much less objectionable than the Viagra flags and commercials
    >> during the
    >> world series. Six year olds were asking "whats Viagra?" The web site
    >> just
    >> seeks to inform and prompt a patient to ask the Dr. Is this right for
    >> me?
    >>

    >
    > I meant this:
    >
    > Get a free trial offer for LOTREL
    >
    > Seems like Novartis wants mainly poor people for guinea-pigs...
    >


    This is the same gimmick they use with physicians. It is also the ploy of
    street drug dealers - to supply enough drug to the 'customer' for
    dependence to set in and then cut off the free samples.

    --
    ~~~
    Patrick Blanchard, M.D., A.B.F.P.
    Board Certified in Family Practice
    http://www.familydoctor.org/blanchard
     
  5. "Patrick Blanchard, M.D." wrote:

    > On Sat, 08 Nov 2003 18:04:27 GMT, eki <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On 08 Nov 2003 16:56:56 GMT, [email protected] (Complex592) wrote:
    > >
    > >> I am not sure what you find objectionable about consumer information and
    > >> awareness. This website was doing nothing that to bring awareness of
    > >> their
    > >> product to those who might benefit or be a possible consumer of the
    > >> product.
    > >> The are targeting an audience just like any other advertising program.
    > >> I find
    > >> that much less objectionable than the Viagra flags and commercials
    > >> during the
    > >> world series. Six year olds were asking "whats Viagra?" The web site
    > >> just
    > >> seeks to inform and prompt a patient to ask the Dr. Is this right for
    > >> me?
    > >>

    > >
    > > I meant this:
    > >
    > > Get a free trial offer for LOTREL
    > >
    > > Seems like Novartis wants mainly poor people for guinea-pigs...
    > >

    >
    > This is the same gimmick they use with physicians. It is also the ploy of
    > street drug dealers - to supply enough drug to the 'customer' for
    > dependence to set in and then cut off the free samples.
    >


    You're being a little unduly harsh, imho, Patrick.

    Last I checked, anti-hypertensive medications are not addicting.

    Humbly,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com
     
  6. On Sun, 09 Nov 2003 19:25:34 GMT, Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Patrick Blanchard, M.D." wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 08 Nov 2003 18:04:27 GMT, eki <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> > On 08 Nov 2003 16:56:56 GMT, [email protected] (Complex592) wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> I am not sure what you find objectionable about consumer information

    >> and
    >> >> awareness. This website was doing nothing that to bring awareness of
    >> >> their
    >> >> product to those who might benefit or be a possible consumer of the
    >> >> product.
    >> >> The are targeting an audience just like any other advertising

    >> program.
    >> >> I find
    >> >> that much less objectionable than the Viagra flags and commercials
    >> >> during the
    >> >> world series. Six year olds were asking "whats Viagra?" The web site
    >> >> just
    >> >> seeks to inform and prompt a patient to ask the Dr. Is this right for
    >> >> me?
    >> >>
    >> >
    >> > I meant this:
    >> >
    >> > Get a free trial offer for LOTREL
    >> >
    >> > Seems like Novartis wants mainly poor people for guinea-pigs...
    >> >

    >>
    >> This is the same gimmick they use with physicians. It is also the ploy
    >> of
    >> street drug dealers - to supply enough drug to the 'customer' for
    >> dependence to set in and then cut off the free samples.
    >>

    >
    > You're being a little unduly harsh, imho, Patrick.
    >
    > Last I checked, anti-hypertensive medications are not addicting.
    >
    > Humbly,
    >
    > Andrew
    >
    > --
    > Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    > Board-Certified Cardiologist
    > http://www.heartmdphd.com
    >
    >
    >


    I have seen too many patients bounce in and out of physician offices whith
    the latest samples, only to switch to another when the samples of that
    perticular medication have been pulled.

    Most likely, these same patients could do far better by choosing a
    substitute in the generic catagory.

    --
    ~~~
    Patrick Blanchard, M.D., A.B.F.P.
    Board Certified in Family Practice
    http://www.familydoctor.org/blanchard
     
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