Marmalade question

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Peter Aitken, Feb 11, 2006.

  1. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels of
    5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?

    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
    Tags:


  2. "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels
    > of 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?
    >
    > --
    > Peter Aitken
    > Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm

    Yes, the peels are used for orange marmalade. You will also need some
    chopped orange. My recipe also uses some chopped lemon. When you make the
    marmalade, be sure to follow the directions. When you are told to boil/cook
    the unsugared mixture until the peel is tender, do exactly that. Later
    cooking will not tenderized the peel because with the sugar added the peel
    is becoming preserved. All the recipes are pretty much the same except they
    result in different volume. Recipe follows.

    You could also use the peels to make candied orange peel that would be
    useful in holiday recipes or add the peel to some water along with whole
    cloves, cinnamon sticks and star anise. Simmer this mixture all day for a
    delightful, humidifying potpourri.

    From Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning, Freezing and Dehydrating

    Orange Marmalade
    2 cups thinly sliced orange peel (about 10 medium)
    1 quart chopped orange pulp (about 10 medium)
    1 cup thinly sliced lemon (NOTE: this is the whole lemon, not just
    peel) --about 2 medium lemons
    1 1/2 quarts water
    Sugar (about 6 cups)

    Combine all ingredients, except sugar; simmer 5 minutes. Cover and let
    stand 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Cook rapidly until peel is tender,
    about 1 hour. Measure fruit and liquid. Add 1 cup sugar for each cup fruit
    mixture, stirring until dissolved. Cook rapidly to gelling point. As
    mixture thickens, stir frequently to prevent sticking. Remove from heat.
    Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot marmalade into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch
    headspace. Adjust two-piece caps. Process 10 minutes in a boiling-water
    canner. Yield: about 7 half pints.

    Excellent on toasted English muffins.

    Janet
     
  3. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:
    > We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels of
    > 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?


    Yes... but it really doesn't pay... you can buy a large jar of
    stupidmarket brand marmalade for about $2 that will be better than what
    you can make from those flavorless generic juice orange rinds. If
    you're willing to go through the trouble than choose something
    interesting, like tangerine, tangelo, clementine, grapefruit, etc....
    save them up in your freezer.
     
  4. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels
    >> of 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peter Aitken
    >> Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm

    > Yes, the peels are used for orange marmalade. You will also need some
    > chopped orange. My recipe also uses some chopped lemon. When you make
    > the marmalade, be sure to follow the directions. When you are told to
    > boil/cook the unsugared mixture until the peel is tender, do exactly that.
    > Later cooking will not tenderized the peel because with the sugar added
    > the peel is becoming preserved. All the recipes are pretty much the same
    > except they result in different volume. Recipe follows.
    >
    > You could also use the peels to make candied orange peel that would be
    > useful in holiday recipes or add the peel to some water along with whole
    > cloves, cinnamon sticks and star anise. Simmer this mixture all day for a
    > delightful, humidifying potpourri.
    >
    > From Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning, Freezing and Dehydrating
    >
    > Orange Marmalade
    > 2 cups thinly sliced orange peel (about 10 medium)
    > 1 quart chopped orange pulp (about 10 medium)
    > 1 cup thinly sliced lemon (NOTE: this is the whole lemon, not just
    > peel) --about 2 medium lemons
    > 1 1/2 quarts water
    > Sugar (about 6 cups)
    >
    > Combine all ingredients, except sugar; simmer 5 minutes. Cover and let
    > stand 12 to 18 hours in a cool place. Cook rapidly until peel is tender,
    > about 1 hour. Measure fruit and liquid. Add 1 cup sugar for each cup
    > fruit mixture, stirring until dissolved. Cook rapidly to gelling point.
    > As mixture thickens, stir frequently to prevent sticking. Remove from
    > heat. Skim foam if necessary. Ladle hot marmalade into hot jars, leaving
    > 1/4 inch headspace. Adjust two-piece caps. Process 10 minutes in a
    > boiling-water canner. Yield: about 7 half pints.
    >
    > Excellent on toasted English muffins.
    >
    > Janet
    >
    >


    Thanks!


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  5. "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in news:11uro1r8765ju13
    @corp.supernews.com:

    > From Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning, Freezing and Dehydrating
    >
    > Orange Marmalade


    Has anyone got one that uses only fruit juice, no sugar?

    Also, any sources for bitter oranges?

    --

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why
    the poor have no food, they call me a communist."

    Dom Helder Camara
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:

    > We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels of
    > 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?


    I imagine so. I only make marmalade with Seville oranges. The recipe calls for
    the shredded peels and juice, but there is not much juice in the Seville oranges
    we get here, and the juice you do get from them is pretty wretched stuff that
    you would never want to drink.

    Why not make a small batch and see. Just slice up the peel, add some regular
    orange juice, cover with water and simmer it until you get can squish the peels
    with your fingers. Then mix the mash with equal parts of sugar and boil it down
    it starts to thicken. Use an inverted bowl to test the consistency.
     
  7. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Michel Boucher wrote:

    >
    > > Orange Marmalade

    >
    > Has anyone got one that uses only fruit juice, no sugar?
    >
    > Also, any sources for bitter oranges?
    >


    Marmalade with bitter oranges and no sugar. You are a brave man Michel.
    I have not noticed any Seville oranges in the stores lately. They are
    usually out by this time. Maybe they came and went. If you intend to
    make Seville marmalade you need to start looking for the fruit in
    January. From my experience, they are rarely available for more than two
    weeks.

    There is a local company that makes james without added sugar, but they
    use sweet fruits. I just can't imagine bitter marmalade without the
    sugar.
     
  8. On Sat 11 Feb 2006 07:41:51a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Michel
    Boucher?

    > "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in news:11uro1r8765ju13
    > @corp.supernews.com:
    >
    >> From Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning, Freezing and Dehydrating
    >>
    >> Orange Marmalade

    >
    > Has anyone got one that uses only fruit juice, no sugar?


    I have seen a few recipes that use white grape juice and ornage juice for
    sweetness, but they also required something for a thickener like gelatin or
    tapioca. I wasn't inclined to try it.

    > Also, any sources for bitter oranges?
    >


    Bitter or sour oranges are grown here in AZ as ornamental trees/fruit and
    are usually free for the asking if you don't have your own tree. I have
    only occasionally seen Seville oranges for sale in the market. This is the
    season for them, however.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  9. Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Bitter or sour oranges are grown here in AZ as ornamental
    > trees/fruit and are usually free for the asking if you don't have
    > your own tree.


    Same thing in Andalucia. In fact, they find it odd that the British
    want these oranges as they are considered inedible. Even the birds
    won't eat them.

    Mad dogs and Englishmen, eh?

    --

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why
    the poor have no food, they call me a communist."

    Dom Helder Camara
     
  10. Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Michel Boucher wrote:
    >
    >> > Orange Marmalade

    >>
    >> Has anyone got one that uses only fruit juice, no sugar?
    >>
    >> Also, any sources for bitter oranges?

    >
    > Marmalade with bitter oranges and no sugar. You are a brave man
    > Michel. I have not noticed any Seville oranges in the stores
    > lately. They are usually out by this time. Maybe they came and
    > went. If you intend to make Seville marmalade you need to start
    > looking for the fruit in January. From my experience, they are
    > rarely available for more than two weeks.
    >
    > There is a local company that makes james without added sugar, but
    > they use sweet fruits. I just can't imagine bitter marmalade
    > without the sugar.


    Actually, those were two separate questions :) I wasn't planning on
    making marmalade with Seville oranges without sugar, although I would
    probably use fructose instead.

    I'll ask at the fruit market next time I'm downtown.

    --

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why
    the poor have no food, they call me a communist."

    Dom Helder Camara
     
  11. On Sat 11 Feb 2006 09:08:38a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Michel
    Boucher?

    > Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> Bitter or sour oranges are grown here in AZ as ornamental
    >> trees/fruit and are usually free for the asking if you don't have your
    >> own tree.

    >
    > Same thing in Andalucia. In fact, they find it odd that the British
    > want these oranges as they are considered inedible. Even the birds
    > won't eat them.
    >
    > Mad dogs and Englishmen, eh?
    >


    Must be so. :)

    I like cooking with these oranges. Also, not sugar or fat free, but their
    juice and grated rind substituted in a recipe for lemon meringue pie is
    delightful. Also good for cooking with meats.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright o¿o
    ____________________

    BIOYA
     
  12. Syssi

    Syssi Guest

    "Janet Bostwick"&Peter Aitken"
    >> We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels
    >> of 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Peter Aitken
    >> Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm

    > Yes, the peels are used for orange marmalade. You will also need some
    > chopped orange. My recipe also uses some chopped lemon. When you make
    > the marmalade, be sure to follow the directions. When you are told to
    > boil/cook the unsugared mixture until the peel is tender, do exactly that.
    > Later cooking will not tenderized the peel because with the sugar added
    > the peel is becoming preserved. All the recipes are pretty much the same
    > except they result in different volume. Recipe follows.
    >
    > You could also use the peels to make candied orange peel that would be
    > useful in holiday recipes or add the peel to some water along with whole
    > cloves, cinnamon sticks and star anise. Simmer this mixture all day for a
    > delightful, humidifying potpourri.
    >
    > From Ball Blue Book Guide to Home Canning, Freezing and Dehydrating
    >

    <snipping great recipe>
    Janet
    > ====


    ....and if nothing else, it's great to grind up in your sink disposal! Makes
    the disposal and your kitchen smell lovely!

    --
    Syssi
     
  13. Ophelia

    Ophelia Guest

    "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Sat 11 Feb 2006 09:08:38a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Michel
    > Boucher?
    >
    >> Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> Bitter or sour oranges are grown here in AZ as ornamental
    >>> trees/fruit and are usually free for the asking if you don't have
    >>> your
    >>> own tree.

    >>
    >> Same thing in Andalucia. In fact, they find it odd that the British
    >> want these oranges as they are considered inedible. Even the birds
    >> won't eat them.
    >>
    >> Mad dogs and Englishmen, eh?
    >>

    >
    > Must be so. :)


    Oi!
     
  14. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Peter Aitken wrote:
    > We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels of
    > 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?
    >



    Not really. It only takes a few oranges to make a lot of marmalade, and
    you need the whole orange, not just the peel.

    Cut into strips, candy them, and dip them in chocolate.

    Best regards,
    Bob


    Tangerine Marmalade

    I simmered 2 pounds of "Honey" tangerines and 2 largish lemons in 6 cups
    of water, covered, for a couple of hours, then let it cool enough to
    handle. I cut the cooked fruit in half and scooped out the pulp and put
    it back in the cooking water. I set the peels aside for later. I
    simmered the pulp and seeds for about a half an hour, mashing
    occasionally with a potato smasher. Then I strained the juice out of the
    pulp with a jelly bag, squeezing it as dry as possible. I sliced the
    cooked tangerine peel in to slivers and added them to the strained juice
    in a big but shallow stock pot. Brought it to a boil, added 8 cups of
    sugar, and cooked and stirred until the sugar was dissolved. I tasted
    it, and it wasn't tart enough so I added 1/2 cup of bottled lemon juice
    ("Honey" tangerines are not very sour at all.) The lemon juice helped a
    lot, but I think it would have been better with just 1/4 cup, or maybe
    1/3. I cooked it until 222 degrees on a candy thermometer, let it cool
    to about 200 degrees, and ladled into 8 half-pint jars, and a little dab
    left over. BWB for 10 minutes. All the peel floated to the top of the
    jars during processing, so I shook them and turned them upside down
    after they went "ping".

    Notes: blue ribbon, Olmsted County Fair, 2005
     
  15. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Michel Boucher wrote:

    > Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > Bitter or sour oranges are grown here in AZ as ornamental
    > > trees/fruit and are usually free for the asking if you don't have
    > > your own tree.

    >
    > Same thing in Andalucia. In fact, they find it odd that the British
    > want these oranges as they are considered inedible. Even the birds
    > won't eat them.


    A few years ago I was looking for Seville oranges and tried a new
    grocery store. I asked one of the guys stocking the shelves and he
    seemed unsure what I was referring to until he had a brainwave and said
    "Oh yeah, those are the really tasty oranges". Obviously this produce
    department employee did not know his produce. They are indeed inedible.
    But they make great marmalade.
     
  16. limey

    limey Guest

    "Michel Boucher" wrote
    >
    > Same thing in Andalucia. In fact, they find it odd that the British
    > want these oranges as they are considered inedible. Even the birds
    > won't eat them.
    >
    > Mad dogs and Englishmen, eh?


    And French Canadians too, right Michel?

    Dora
     
  17. sf

    sf Guest

    On Sat, 11 Feb 2006 12:37:32 GMT, Peter Aitken wrote:

    > We have been squeezing fresh orange juice lately, and every day the peels of
    > 5-6 oranges go in the trash. Could these be used to make marmelade?


    Yes of course, you could also candy them.
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  18. "limey" <[email protected]> wrote in news:456p3uF56ramU1
    @individual.net:

    > "Michel Boucher" wrote
    >>
    >> Same thing in Andalucia. In fact, they find it odd that the British
    >> want these oranges as they are considered inedible. Even the birds
    >> won't eat them.
    >>
    >> Mad dogs and Englishmen, eh?

    >
    > And French Canadians too, right Michel?


    Did we have an empire in India? I think not...:)

    --

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why
    the poor have no food, they call me a communist."

    Dom Helder Camara
     
  19. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > Has anyone got one that uses only fruit juice, no sugar?
    >


    My wife has made grapefruit jelly. It works.

    > Also, any sources for bitter oranges?
    >


    Seville oranges. I had to plant a couple of trees ... never seen them on sale
    anywhere. Lovely marmalade.

    -P.

    --
    =========================================
    firstname dot lastname at gmail fullstop com
     
Loading...