Mavic MA40 rim question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Karen, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. Karen

    Karen Guest

    I've an old Vitus aluminum that due to space limitations in my apartment
    was stored outside with a cover for a few years. I wasn't riding it but
    would like to this summer. The issue is that there is rust around the
    nipple area on the rim (they are anodized) otherwise the bike
    frame/components are fine from enduring the elements (snow, rain, but
    covered). Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically
    without damaging the rims further? Have the rims been weakened by the
    rust? It is not extensive and only on that small "washer-like" raise
    where the spoke enters the rim. I love the bike but can't afford to
    purchase new rims for it at this point and would like to be able to
    occasionally ride it without fear that the rims are going to break, an
    accident that I don't want.

    Thanks

    Karen
     
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  2. Karen wrote:
    > I've an old Vitus aluminum that due to space limitations in my apartment
    > was stored outside with a cover for a few years. I wasn't riding it but
    > would like to this summer. The issue is that there is rust around the
    > nipple area on the rim (they are anodized) otherwise the bike
    > frame/components are fine from enduring the elements (snow, rain, but
    > covered). Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically
    > without damaging the rims further? Have the rims been weakened by the
    > rust? It is not extensive and only on that small "washer-like" raise
    > where the spoke enters the rim. I love the bike but can't afford to
    > purchase new rims for it at this point and would like to be able to
    > occasionally ride it without fear that the rims are going to break, an
    > accident that I don't want.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Karen


    Prpbabl;y surface rust is all. Unsightly but probably not a structural
    issue. I wouldn't worry about it.
     
  3. jim beam

    jim beam Guest

    Karen wrote:
    > I've an old Vitus aluminum that due to space limitations in my apartment
    > was stored outside with a cover for a few years. I wasn't riding it but
    > would like to this summer. The issue is that there is rust around the
    > nipple area on the rim (they are anodized) otherwise the bike
    > frame/components are fine from enduring the elements (snow, rain, but
    > covered). Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically
    > without damaging the rims further? Have the rims been weakened by the
    > rust? It is not extensive and only on that small "washer-like" raise
    > where the spoke enters the rim. I love the bike but can't afford to
    > purchase new rims for it at this point and would like to be able to
    > occasionally ride it without fear that the rims are going to break, an
    > accident that I don't want.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Karen


    the corrosion can cause problems, but there's not much you can do about
    it. chemical solutions can make a temporary difference to appearance,
    but do not adequately address corrosion at the eyelet/rim hole interface
    and may indeed accelerate the problem subsequently.

    if it were my bike, if there was no cracking or eyelet separation
    already apparent, i'd just ride it as-is & not worry. it may be some
    years before you have any failure, & even then, it's unlikely to be
    sudden or catastrophic, just gradual degradation.
     
  4. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    A drop a oil at the eyelet/spoke interface and wipe the area clean with a rag. Look around the eyelet for cracks in the rim surface. If no cracks, you are safe to ride.
     
  5. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 06:40:42 -0500, Karen <[email protected]> may
    have said:

    >I've an old Vitus aluminum that due to space limitations in my apartment
    >was stored outside with a cover for a few years. I wasn't riding it but
    >would like to this summer. The issue is that there is rust around the
    >nipple area on the rim (they are anodized) otherwise the bike
    >frame/components are fine from enduring the elements (snow, rain, but
    >covered). Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically
    >without damaging the rims further? Have the rims been weakened by the
    >rust? It is not extensive and only on that small "washer-like" raise
    >where the spoke enters the rim. I love the bike but can't afford to
    >purchase new rims for it at this point and would like to be able to
    >occasionally ride it without fear that the rims are going to break, an
    >accident that I don't want.


    Orange rust is from iron; on an MA40, that's just surface
    discoloration from water that had some iron in it, possibly having
    come off the spokes or from the eyelets, although I thought those were
    brass.

    Wipe it off with a rag and ignore it. A small drop of oil on each of
    the eyelets is a good idea, as someone else mentioned, and it's wide
    to inspect the area around each spoke for cracks. If they're present,
    they should be visible in good light. If you don't see any, put air
    in the tires and wind in your hair!

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  6. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    Karen wrote:
    > I've an old Vitus aluminum that due to space limitations in my

    apartment
    > was stored outside with a cover for a few years. I wasn't riding it

    but
    > would like to this summer. The issue is that there is rust around the


    > nipple area on the rim (they are anodized) otherwise the bike
    > frame/components are fine from enduring the elements (snow, rain, but


    > covered). Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically
    > without damaging the rims further? Have the rims been weakened by

    the
    > rust? It is not extensive and only on that small "washer-like" raise


    > where the spoke enters the rim. I love the bike but can't afford to
    > purchase new rims for it at this point and would like to be able to
    > occasionally ride it without fear that the rims are going to break,

    an
    > accident that I don't want.


    Seems like the sockets have rusted a little. I don't think there's any
    danger of structural failure. Try cleaning the rust with some steel
    wool. Put some oil on the nipple/spoke junction and the nipple/socket
    junction. The real problem with these wheels is that the nipples may be
    frozen, so you won't be able to turn them if the wheels need truing.
     
  7. Karen

    Karen Guest

    Peter Cole wrote:
    > Karen wrote:
    >
    >>I've an old Vitus aluminum that due to space limitations in my

    >
    > apartment
    >
    >>was stored outside with a cover for a few years. I wasn't riding it

    >
    > but
    >
    >>would like to this summer. The issue is that there is rust around the

    >
    >
    >>nipple area on the rim (they are anodized) otherwise the bike
    >>frame/components are fine from enduring the elements (snow, rain, but

    >
    >
    >>covered). Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically
    >>without damaging the rims further? Have the rims been weakened by

    >
    > the
    >
    >>rust? It is not extensive and only on that small "washer-like" raise

    >
    >
    >>where the spoke enters the rim. I love the bike but can't afford to
    >>purchase new rims for it at this point and would like to be able to
    >>occasionally ride it without fear that the rims are going to break,

    >
    > an
    >
    >>accident that I don't want.

    >
    >
    > Seems like the sockets have rusted a little. I don't think there's any
    > danger of structural failure. Try cleaning the rust with some steel
    > wool. Put some oil on the nipple/spoke junction and the nipple/socket
    > junction. The real problem with these wheels is that the nipples may be
    > frozen, so you won't be able to turn them if the wheels need truing.
    >

    Thanks Peter, Werehatrack, Jim, and Peter (Campy)

    I'll remove the tires and check the rims carefully and then if no cracks
    will go over with steel wool and oil as suggested. A new set of tires
    (probably 700x25c Continentals) are in order and then out for a good
    ride. It's just for pleasure, no heavy duty stuff. I'm almost 60 and
    just want to get some enjoyment out of the bike that I haven't ridden
    for years. Love the Vitus but the geometry sometimes gets to this old
    lady! (it's a bit "quick").

    I'm really glad I asked!

    Karen
     
  8. Is there a way that the rust can be removed chemically without
    damaging the rims further?

    No. most FEO_2 acids are antagonistic to aluminum.

    Have the rims been weakened by the rust?

    No. most rust is self-limiting.

    I've heard of spoke grommets literally falling out of rims (happened
    to me on some nashbar wheels - before they rusted), and no rim
    failure. But it is irritating to hear that tinkling sound as the
    grommets fall to the freewheel cluster then fall to the rim as I ride
    down the street. So i glued them in place with silicone!

    You hopefully have 36 spokes on those wheels. That's an amazing fault
    tolerant system. If you lose a spoke grommet what's the worst that
    could happen? rim goes a few mm out of true and you ride home .. bump
    .... bump ... bump. The nipple will keep the spoke in position. This
    type of failure should be even more benign than breaking a spoke.

    - Don Gillies
    San Diego, CA
     
  9. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 18:14:54 -0500, Karen <[email protected]> may
    have said:

    >I'll remove the tires and check the rims carefully and then if no cracks
    >will go over with steel wool and oil as suggested.


    Just clarifying, the cracks (if there are any) won't be visible from
    inside; they'll be in the exposed surface of the rim at the eyelet
    holes. No need to remove the tires to find them.

    While you have the tires off, though, you can check for white
    (sometimes fluffy) aluminum corrosion on the inside. It's easily
    removed with ammonia.

    >A new set of tires
    >(probably 700x25c Continentals) are in order and then out for a good
    >ride. It's just for pleasure, no heavy duty stuff. I'm almost 60 and
    >just want to get some enjoyment out of the bike that I haven't ridden
    >for years. Love the Vitus but the geometry sometimes gets to this old
    >lady! (it's a bit "quick").


    You may be amazed at how quickly it all comes back...

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
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