Mavic Open Pro vs. MA3 rims

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Doctor Morbius, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    What are the basic differences between the Mavic Open Pro rim vs the Mavic MA3 rims?

    I know there is a weight difference of 45 grams. That isn't an issue as I don't race. My question is which rims are stonger and are more suited for a heavier rider? I'm considering getting either a pair of MA3 rims laced to 105 hubs or a pair of Open Pro's laced to Ultegra hubs and am wondering which would be the best option.

    Both rims appear very similar in external shape (classic styled?). The MA3, however, has quite a bit of extra material in the form of two tubes going along the edge of the rims near the braking surface, hence the extra weight. Please forgive me if I don't know the exact terminology for that. :eek: My instincts tell me that the MA3 would be a better choice for a heavier rider because of that extra material but I would like to know for sure.

    Your help and advice certainly is apprciated. Thanks in advance.

    Link To Open Pro...
    http://www.mavic.com/servlet/srt/mavic/road-prod_fiche?product.id=59&lg=uk

    Link to MA3...
    http://www.mavic.com/servlet/srt/mavic/road-prod_fiche?product.id=55&lg=uk


    It also appears there is a similar difference between the CPX22 and the CPX33 with the CPX22 being heavier but perhaps more suited for heavier riders.
     
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  2. meehs

    meehs New Member

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    The MA3's are supposed to be a heavier-duty rim. You'll see MA3's on a lot of cyclocross and touring bikes. I'm a pretty big guy (6'4" 200 lbs.) and I have a set of MA3's laced to 105 hubs on my cross bike. I probably put more miles on that bike than any of my other ones since I use it for commuting and the wheels have held-up very well. I wouldn't hesitiate to recommend that set-up. It's a pretty economical wheelset too.
     
  3. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    MA3 rims are rated by Mavic for 85 kg riders and they are not as strong as Open Pro, CXP22, CXP33 rims which are rated by Mavic for 100 kg riders.
    Rim weight and extrusion geometry are only a couple of rim attributes. Rim weight can fool you!
    If you want stronger rims than the standard Mavic road rims A319 is rated at 115 kg and A719 is rated at 125 kg.
    Velocity Dyad is also a very strong rim without the Mavic welding and eyelets... and suitable for wide tires. We use Velocity Dyad rims on our touring tandem with 175 kg of rider weight for over 7,000 miles. Velocity Deep V 700C is very srtong but is only suitable for tires to 28 mm.
     
  4. meehs

    meehs New Member

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    That surprises me because I've usually seen the MA3 rims on cross and touring bikes and the Open Pros on lightweight racing bikes. That and the fact that the MA3's are heavier led me to believe that the MA3 was the '"stonger" rim. Maybe it's more of a cost thing than a weight thing? Sorry for the misinformation!
     
  5. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Anyone have any thoughts on the Mavic A719 rims? Seems as though they may be marketed toward urban commuting and touring and may suit my needs better than either the MA3 or Open Pro.

    Seems I can get a pair of wheels with A719 rims laced to 105 hubs for $200 from Performance Bike before coupons. I'm really interested more in durability than bling. Thanks again.
     
  6. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    A719 rims are the strongest 700C rim Mavic makes.
    They are made for 28 mm and wider tires.
    Will those tires clear your fork/brakes/frame?
    105 hubs are a very good value and reliable/durable/serviceable.
    Performance built wheels need help in the spoke alignment/tension balancing/and stress relieving areas. However, it is difficult to buy the parts of the wheels for less than $200.
    Can you care the the details of finishing the wheels?
     
  7. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    David: Just curious, but how much hand labor time do you think Performance puts into these wheels vs. what you or another custom builder would spend?

    Based on my experience, I think well-built wheels are a great investment. They stay true a lot longer, and provide many more miles of maintenance-free service.
     
  8. Doctor Morbius

    Doctor Morbius New Member

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    Hmmmm, A719's would probably clear everything on my Sequoia but doubtful they would work on my Allez or Supercourse. It would be nice to have everything interchangable so I'll scratch that idea.


    No I don't have a tension meter or trueing stand. I would have to take them to the LBS and have them adjusted and trued for $10 per wheel. I'd call them first and ask if they actually use those tools or if they just eyeball it. I can do the latter.

    Nashbar currently has a sale on CXP22/Tiagra wheels. Combined with a 15% off coupon they're pretty cheap. Not the best of components to be sure but as you say the CXP22 rims are rated for 100kg riders and are more durable than the MA3 rims. Tiagra hubs may not be as smooth or durable as 105 or Ultegra but I could repack them more frequently. That should help.

    http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?sku=2281

    The wheels I'm looking to buy will only be used for exercise. No racing in my future. Thanks for your help.
     
  9. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    Most every builder has procedures they follow and they vary.
    Each detail, from preparing the nipple, spoke, and rim/nipple interface makes a difference in the investment.
    The additional time is in the range of 1-1/2 hours per wheel.
    Since I spend the time, I agree that doing so is worth the return on investment.
     
  10. dhk

    dhk New Member

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    Thanks for the info. I'm not trying to advertise for you here. Just trying to make the point that build quality is everything in a wheelset. Perhaps it takes going through a couple of low-priced mail order wheels before people can appreciate the difference.
     
  11. daveornee

    daveornee New Member

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    You are 100% correct. Build quality is everything!
    My experiences with machine built wheels and even hand built wheels that aren't done following all the correct procedures just don't hold up well to serious riding. Heavier riders and/or ones who ride rough surfaces will experience difficulties sooner. Science tells us most of the answers, if we pay attention. F = M*A (Force equals mass times acceleration) & the shortest distance between two points is a straight line.
    Even the sturdiest rims, spokes, and hubs need a quality build to get the most out of them.
     
  12. Adam-from-SLO

    Adam-from-SLO New Member

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    Word !

    Its all about the Master Wheel Builder !
     
  13. jtill

    jtill New Member

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    I think ma3's sound the best for you. Stronger than open pros, but not as hefty as the bigger touring rims and still let you fit a pretty small tire, which will be nice for exercise. The 105 hubs are great too- I ride on on the front of my fixie through rain n' stuff, and it spins just as well as the sealed cartridge bearing hub in the back.

    ride on,
    jeremy
     
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