Mavic T520 rear wheel spoke choice

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Hal Jordan, Jun 16, 2003.

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  1. Hal Jordan

    Hal Jordan Guest

    I broke two spokes on the non-drive side of my rear wheel this morning. It's the T224 rim that came
    with my Bianchi Volpe about 2000 miles ago. I broke a single spoke on the same rim at around 1500
    miles and ended up with a flat spot that resulted in uneven spoke tension and that might have
    contributed to the latest failure.

    So I'm thinking of replacing the rim with a Mavic 36H T520. Would
    14/15 drive side, and 14/17 non-drive side be good? It's my commuting bike and my ride has some
    hills, lots of pot holes, and I'm about 180lbs with an addtional 15-20lbs on the rear rack.

    Thanks!

    Tuyen
     
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  2. David Ornee

    David Ornee Guest

    "Hal Jordan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I broke two spokes on the non-drive side of my rear wheel this morning. It's the T224 rim that
    > came with my Bianchi Volpe about 2000 miles ago. I broke a single spoke on the same rim at around
    > 1500 miles and ended up with a flat spot that resulted in uneven spoke tension and that might have
    > contributed to the latest failure.
    >
    > So I'm thinking of replacing the rim with a Mavic 36H T520. Would
    > 14/15 drive side, and 14/17 non-drive side be good? It's my commuting bike and my ride has some
    > hills, lots of pot holes, and I'm about 180lbs with an addtional 15-20lbs on the rear rack.
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Tuyen

    I would also consider the Bontrager Fairlane OSB rim for the rear because of the offset spoke bed. I
    built a couple of pair for touring riders. They are holding up perfectly. If you use them, I would
    stay with 14/15 DB (or DT Alpine III 13/15/14) for both sides as the tension is within 15% left to
    right. You might also consider the Velocity Dyad. We use them for touring and tandem. They have
    worked perfectly as well. The Dyad has no eyelets. I have also used T520 and T519 rims for touring
    with perfect results. Using the T520 will result in the largest tension disparity from left to
    right. I think your idea of 14/17 spokes for the left side with these rims will work. However, if
    you follow the tension methods in Jobst book, you will get a significant amount of stretch due to
    the extremely high tension that results. You might consider DT Alpine III for the right side and DT
    Competition 14/15 for the left with these rims and the Dyads.

    David Ornee, Western Springs, IL
     
  3. Hal wrote-<< I broke two spokes on the non-drive side of my rear wheel this morning. It's the T224
    rim that came with my Bianchi Volpe about 2000 miles ago. I broke a single spoke on the same rim at
    around 1500 miles and ended up with a flat spot that resulted in uneven spoke tension and that might
    have contributed to the latest failure.

    So I'm thinking of replacing the rim with a Mavic 36H T520. Would
    14/15 drive side, and 14/17 non-drive side be good? It's my commuting bike and my ride has some
    hills, lots of pot holes, and I'm about 180lbs with an addtional 15-20lbs on the rear rack.

    Thanks! >><BR><BR>

    If it's a commuting bike, with loads, why on earth would you want to use 14/17 on the left?

    Have the wheel built well by a good wheelbuilder with 36 -14/15 spokes, laced three cross and stress
    relieved along with proper tension, trueness, roundness and dish.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (15)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  4. dornee-<< Using the T520 will result in the largest tension disparity from left to right. I think
    your idea of 14/17 spokes for the left side with these rims will work. However, if you follow the
    tension methods in Jobst book, you will get a significant amount of stretch due to the extremely
    high tension that
    results>><BR><BR>

    Don't get this, the 'tension' of the left side spokes measured in kilograms of force will be the
    same regardless of spoke gauge, if the right =side spokes are tensiponed properly and the wheel is
    dished, round and true.

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  5. Hal Jordan

    Hal Jordan Guest

    [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > If it's a commuting bike, with loads, why on earth would you want to use 14/17 on the left?
    >

    Good question. This is from Peter White's site:

    "Campagnolo rear hubs have a lot of dish, or spoke offset. This results in high tension on the drive
    side spokes, and low tension on the left side spokes. To compensate for this, with most rims, I use
    a lighter gauge spoke on the left side. It adds only a few dollars to the cost, and will result in a
    more durable wheel. So most of these wheelsets with Campy hubs are priced with Wheelsmith 14-16
    spokes for the front wheel and the right rear, and 14-17 for the left rear."

    I've assumed that the lighter tension on the non-drive side allows a thinner gauge spoke to be
    cranked tighter, reducing the chance that a nipple would work itself loose.

    > Have the wheel built well by a good wheelbuilder with 36 -14/15 spokes, laced three cross and
    > stress relieved along with proper tension, trueness, roundness and dish.
    >

    Heh heh... the wheelbuilder would be *me*.

    Tuyen
     
  6. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    "Hal Jordan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > [email protected] (Qui si parla Campagnolo) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > >
    > > If it's a commuting bike, with loads, why on earth would you want to use
    14/17
    > > on the left?
    > >
    >
    > Good question. This is from Peter White's site:
    >
    > "Campagnolo rear hubs have a lot of dish, or spoke offset. This results in high tension on the
    > drive side spokes, and low tension on the left side spokes. To compensate for this, with most
    > rims, I use a lighter gauge spoke on the left side. It adds only a few dollars to the cost, and
    > will result in a more durable wheel. So most of these wheelsets with Campy hubs are priced with
    > Wheelsmith 14-16 spokes for the front wheel and the right rear, and 14-17 for the left rear."
    >
    > I've assumed that the lighter tension on the non-drive side allows a thinner gauge spoke to be
    > cranked tighter, reducing the chance that a nipple would work itself loose.

    That's not correct. The thinner spokes on the left side will exhibit more elasticity and, therefore,
    be more resilient for a given tension.

    > > Have the wheel built well by a good wheelbuilder with 36 -14/15 spokes,
    laced
    > > three cross and stress relieved along with proper tension, trueness,
    roundness
    > > and dish.
    > >
    >
    > Heh heh... the wheelbuilder would be *me*.

    Go for it.

    --
    Robin Hubert <[email protected]
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "Robin Hubert" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:p[email protected]...
    > "Hal Jordan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I've assumed that the lighter tension on the non-drive side allows a thinner gauge spoke to be
    > > cranked tighter, reducing the chance that a nipple would work itself loose.
    >
    > That's not correct. The thinner spokes on the left side will exhibit more elasticity and,
    > therefore, be more resilient for a given tension.

    In case there's still confusion, the more "resilient" spokes will de-tension less for a given rim
    displacement, so will be less prone to nipples unscrewing.
     
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