Max Heart Rate

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by miday, Jul 27, 2003.

  1. miday

    miday New Member

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    I'm 41 and during todays 100 km ride at about 30 min in during a sprint I hit 196 bpm. Should I be concerned about this? Previous highs are around 185 over the past 6 months.

    cheers
    Mick
     
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  2. oneradtec

    oneradtec New Member

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    This reading would seem to far exceed your typical max heart rate for your age. However, This isn't all that uncommon. Did your heart rate recover to it's normal range in a proportional scale to intensity? If this was some sort of abnormal tachycardia or arrythmia...it probably would have not recovered smartly..and may have continued for a certain period of irritation to you. I would keep a watch on this...especially during high levels of intensity. If this persists...I would see a doctor for an ekg or perhaps an exercise stress test just as a precaution since it would be somewhat abnormal to see heart rates so high for your age. We cannot rule out that the reading may have been an error from your heart monitor perhaps from some sort of interference. Is your monitor a hi end or low end monitor? It might be to your advantage to upgrade to a top level monitor..which may give better accuracy and consistency. I wouldn't be too concerned with this one episode. I would look for a pattern..and then see a doctor for some routine testing if needed.



     
  3. Lazarus-g

    Lazarus-g New Member

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    Bloody HRM's. I'd like to hear about this also because since buying one last month I'm getting paranoid.

    My HR lives in the 150-170's, hitting hills it's 180's and I noticed today it hit 190. Coming down the hills it drops back down very quickly to the low 100's but should I be concerned ?

    I'm also forty, so by rights I'm above the norm for my age.

    Mick I don't mean to hijack your thread far from it, I also want to hear the replies, but I felt starting another topic on a very similar subject would be stupid. hope you don't mind.
     
  4. serottarider

    serottarider New Member

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    I'm with Lazarus!

    Max HR formulae are designed for the average person and cyclists in training aren't average by any stretch of the imagination.

    For example, I'm 56 and my max HR is 193. My resting HR is 48. So, assuming that your HRM is using a coded transmitter (so you don't pick up someone else's heartrate in the sprint) the 196 figure isn't wildly out of the ballpark. Assuming that you're in decent shape, not significantly overweight, eating a sensible diet and not having any sinister symptoms you probably don't need to worry.
    BTW I actually recorded a max of 220 about a year ago when a woman using her cell phone while driving a car ran me off the road. I don't use that figure for training calculations though <grin>.
     
  5. miday

    miday New Member

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    serottarider,
    Thanks for the feedback. I put the monitor on last night and recorded at 15 sec intervals during the night. Low of 39 and average of 45. The peak from Sunday's ride in hindsight was not that far above provious peaks over the last six months (the time I have been riding). Maybe I'm just in good shape for my age? If I was 15 years younger I wouldn't have given it a second thought.

    cheers
    Michael

    PS if anyone out there thinks I should be concerned - please let me know.
     
  6. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    Miday:

    Why worry about it. Do you feel healthy???

    Your past max over the last 6 months was 185 bpm. During the last 6 months, you have become fitter, and resultantly, can push yourself harder than you did before, which will result in a higher heart rate.

    All the formulas for max heart rate can be accurate or they can be way off. There is really no reason for anyone to follow them for any reason.

    The most accurate test for max heart rate is a quality monitor, a well rested body, and motivation to push hard.

    Good luck!!!
     
  7. SCBiker

    SCBiker New Member

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    My HR use to always be towards my max and then I'd hit a hill and it would go through the roof. But, I have kept training and my weight has dropped 15 lbs this year and now my HR has settled down. Stays around the 130's on the flat and into the 160's when climbing.

    I am not trying to say that you are over weight, but keep putting the miles in and hopefully your HR il drop too. The benefit I have now is that when my buddies start to struggle I can pull away from them as I got use to holding my HR way above 170!
     
  8. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    I've seen higher and lower figures for max HR in subjects of your age. it's impossible to say whether this is a problem for you.

    If you are at all concerned then you should schedule an appointment with your doctor, who will refer you on to a cardiologist, should s/he think it appropriate.

    Trying to obtain advice off the internet for potentially serious problems with little data is in my opinion not a good idea.

    Ric
     
  9. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    As you get fitter your max heart rate actually decreases, by a few beats per minute.

    Ric
     
  10. Aztec

    Aztec New Member

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    Ric, is that because your heart pumps more blood (i.e., more powerful muscular contraction) and for some reason can't handle beating as quickly?
     
  11. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Yes Aztec, as it has a larger stroke volume it takes slightly longer to fill and empty and therefore can do fewer beats per minute.
     
  12. Spider1977

    Spider1977 New Member

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    I'm also in my early 40's and my max heart rate is usually high 180's low 190's. I'd think this is pretty normal for people our age. I've started putting 15 sec intervals on a spreadsheet after every ride. Seems I can sustain HR about 173 to 176 for about 2 minutes and then drop back to mid 160's. So I'm going to aim to sustain the higher rate for slightly longer periods with some interval training. I guess this is the difference between working in the aerobic and anaerobic area. Higher heart rate means you are working anaerobically, the heart is beating faster to get more oxygen in and CO2 out as you get fitter you can spend longer in this zone. But you also pay the price with more lactic acid build up.

    This is where I think the Carmichael 7 week program is really good. It may seem too easy at first, but it is building a base so you can increase your anaerobic capacity. You'll burn those other slack guys on the hills!
     
  13. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Originally posted by Spider1977
    I'm also in my early 40's and my max heart rate is usually high 180's low 190's. I'd think this is pretty normal for people our age.

    >Nothing to worry about here.

    I've started putting 15 sec intervals on a spreadsheet after every ride. Seems I can sustain HR about 173 to 176 for about 2 minutes and then drop back to mid 160's. So I'm going to aim to sustain the higher rate for slightly longer periods with some interval training.

    >Good plan, efforts at your TT pace will help here.

    I guess this is the difference between working in the aerobic and anaerobic area. Higher heart rate means you are working anaerobically, the heart is beating faster to get more oxygen in and CO2 out as you get fitter you can spend longer in this zone. But you also pay the price with more lactic acid build up.

    >The higher the heart rate (above your lactate threshold) means that your anaerobic system is contributing more; your maximal aerobic capacity is acheived at a similar intensity to MHR. Increasing your lactate threshold will mean that you can work at higher power outputs and higher heart rates before lactate starts accumulating in the muscles and blood.

    This is where I think the Carmichael 7 week program is really good. It may seem too easy at first, but it is building a base so you can increase your anaerobic capacity. You'll burn those other slack guys on the hills!

    >I've not seen this plan, but for hills over 1 minute your aerobic capacity rather than anaerobic starts to become more important.
     
  14. Spider1977

    Spider1977 New Member

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    Thanks 2Lap, I always find your responses on these threads very helpful. Do you run coaching clinics on-line?
     
  15. J-MAT

    J-MAT New Member

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    Ric:

    Heart rate may or may not decrease as fitness improves. Heart rate is dependent on muscle mass, and the more sport specific muscle mass that can be recruited, the higher the potential heart rate.

    That's why vigorously playing video games using your thumbs doesn't raise heart rate but involving larger muscle groups (legs) does.

    Many riders don't really push themselves to their limits (even though they think they did) until they get stronger and faster. Unfit riders tend to quit pedalling hard when high lactate levels are encountered. Improved lactate tolerance can let you push harder and hit higher heart rates.
     
  16. never_doped

    never_doped Banned

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    Ric,

    Max heart rate would increase and resting heart rate would decrease as someone becomes more fit.
     
  17. coolworx

    coolworx New Member

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    Improved lactate tolerance

    I thought about this today... it's like becoming tone-deaf. Those poor put upon nerve endings that keep depleting their neurotransmitters, screaming: "THIS HURTTTTSSS!" finally give up trying.
     
  18. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    We were only talking about max heart rate, not submaximal or sustainable heart rates. Your max heart rate may go down a few beats as a rider moves from an untrained to trained state.
     
  19. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    The maximum heart rate that can be acheived will stay the same or go down as you become more trained, for the reasons raised earlier in the thread (increse in stoke volume). At maximal levels a larger stroke volume means that it takes longer to fill and empty the heart, so less beats can fit into a minute.

    The resting heart rate does deacrese for the same reason (increase in stroke volume). The larger stroke volume means that more blood can be pumped with each beat of the heart, so when resting (or at submaximal levels) fewer beats are required to produce the same blood flow.

    These responses are widely accepted, however require a rider to be acheiving their max regularly in training. Inexperianced riders may not be able to acheive their max in training.
     
  20. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Thanks Spider1977, I'm not coaching at the moment just posting on this site. You could give Ric a try, I think he does quite a lot of coaching over the net.
     
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