max load rating for road bikes?



W

Woland99

Guest
I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
I consider getting cyclocross bike as a step toward road bike but
perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?
 
On Feb 18, 2:00 pm, Woland99 <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> I consider getting cyclocross  bike as a step toward road bike but
> perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?


How much do you weigh?

Wheels are the part most subjected to beating by larger folks.

Joseph
 
Woland99 wrote:
> I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> I consider getting cyclocross  bike as a step toward road bike but
> perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?
>


Rarely do bikes come with "max weight" ratings. It would help to know
your weight and intended use of the bike. Typically, wheels could be a
potential trouble source for someone over 200 pounds.

Suggest you stay away from stupid light frames, wheels, tires, bars,
etc. if you're concerned about durability. Also consider using
slightly wider tires (700 x 25 or 700 x 28) if they will fit.

Art Harris
 
On Feb 18, 7:14 am, Art Harris <[email protected]> wrote:
> Woland99 wrote:
> > I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> > Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> > and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> > I consider getting cyclocross bike as a step toward road bike but
> > perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> > that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?

>
> Rarely do bikes come with "max weight" ratings. It would help to know
> your weight and intended use of the bike. Typically, wheels could be a
> potential trouble source for someone over 200 pounds.
>
> Suggest you stay away from stupid light frames, wheels, tires, bars,
> etc. if you're concerned about durability. Also consider using
> slightly wider tires (700 x 25 or 700 x 28) if they will fit.
>
> Art Harris


Well definitely I am over 200 pounds now and by quite a WIDE
margin. I used to ski so I have strong leg muscles so I can
do some hills now even with all that extra weight. Altho fact
is you cannot fool you knees. And even if I go down to my
college/rock climbing weight (which will take a a year or so)
I will still be close to 200 - about 185-190.
So in the meantime I thought about cyclocross bike - maybe
sth hybrid like Bianchi Axis?
 
Woland99 wrote:
> Well definitely I am over 200 pounds now and by quite a WIDE
> margin. I used to ski so I have strong leg muscles so I can
> do some hills now even with all that extra weight. Altho fact
> is you cannot fool you knees. And even if I go down to my
> college/rock climbing weight (which will take a a year or so)
> I will still be close to 200 - about 185-190.
> So in the meantime I thought about cyclocross bike - maybe
> sth hybrid like Bianchi Axis?


There is a world-class sprinter, Thor Hushovd, who weighs about the
same as you and he races superlight carbon road bikes. I prolly have
weighed as much as you by a bit in the past (now stay within +/- 10
lbs of 200) and I have ridden many different bikes of different
materials, some pretty lightweight. Like others said, stay away from
stoopidlight.

You COULD get a bike that would be suitable for you both now and when
you get down to fighting weight but it will most likely cost some
coin. Course, buying two bikes (the cross now, another one later)
will cost some coin too ;) .

There are frames out there that would support you well now and not
beat you to death later. Thor rides a Look, but that's kinda
spendy. I have ridden a Fuji Professional Carbon at around 220 lbs.
and found it plenty stiff for climbing. The Fuji carbon frames
represent a very high performance/dollar ratio, IMO. I also ride a
Storck C1.1, a Schwinn Paramount titanium, and a Schwinn SuperSport.
When I weighed 250+, I rode a Klein Stage, which was more stiff than I
needed.

D'ohBoy
 
On Feb 18, 8:03 am, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Woland99 wrote:
> > Well definitely I am over 200 pounds now and by quite a WIDE
> > margin. I used to ski so I have strong leg muscles so I can
> > do some hills now even with all that extra weight. Altho fact
> > is you cannot fool you knees. And even if I go down to my
> > college/rock climbing weight (which will take a a year or so)
> > I will still be close to 200 - about 185-190.
> > So in the meantime I thought about cyclocross bike - maybe
> > sth hybrid like Bianchi Axis?

>
> There is a world-class sprinter, Thor Hushovd, who weighs about the
> same as you and he races superlight carbon road bikes. I prolly have
> weighed as much as you by a bit in the past (now stay within +/- 10
> lbs of 200) and I have ridden many different bikes of different
> materials, some pretty lightweight. Like others said, stay away from
> stoopidlight.
>
> You COULD get a bike that would be suitable for you both now and when
> you get down to fighting weight but it will most likely cost some
> coin. Course, buying two bikes (the cross now, another one later)
> will cost some coin too ;) .
>
> There are frames out there that would support you well now and not
> beat you to death later. Thor rides a Look, but that's kinda
> spendy. I have ridden a Fuji Professional Carbon at around 220 lbs.
> and found it plenty stiff for climbing. The Fuji carbon frames
> represent a very high performance/dollar ratio, IMO. I also ride a
> Storck C1.1, a Schwinn Paramount titanium, and a Schwinn SuperSport.
> When I weighed 250+, I rode a Klein Stage, which was more stiff than I
> needed.
>
> D'ohBoy


Thanks for all the good info - that is encouraging!
I will research the brands that you mentioned.
Buying a cross bike now and bona fide road bike later
is OK - I can always use cross bike to commute.

JT
 
On 18 Feb, 14:28, Woland99 <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Feb 18, 7:14 am, Art Harris <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Woland99 wrote:
> > > I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> > > Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> > > and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> > > I consider getting cyclocross bike as a step toward road bike but
> > > perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> > > that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?

>
> > Rarely do bikes come with "max weight" ratings. It would help to know
> > your weight and intended use of the bike. Typically, wheels could be a
> > potential trouble source for someone over 200 pounds.

>
> > Suggest you stay away from stupid light frames, wheels, tires, bars,
> > etc. if you're concerned about durability. Also consider using
> > slightly wider tires (700 x 25 or 700 x 28) if they will fit.

>
> > Art Harris

>
> Well definitely I am over 200 pounds now and by quite a WIDE
> margin. I used to ski so I have strong leg muscles so I can
> do some hills now even with all that extra weight. Altho fact
> is you cannot fool you knees. And even if I go down to my
> college/rock climbing weight (which will take a a year or so)
> I will still be close to 200 - about 185-190.
> So in the meantime I thought about cyclocross bike - maybe
> sth hybrid like Bianchi Axis?


I'd say anywhere under 250 you don't need to worry about special gear.
Just don't spend too much on spindly wheels, and replace the stock
wheels with strong ones once they break.

I'm about 220 now, down from 260 or so when I started riding again. I
had problems with cheap low-spoke count wheels, but with a reasonable
spoke count, I haven't had any problems since.

Go ahead and get a cross bike if you want one, but don't get one just
because you think you are too big for a road bike.

Have fun!

Joseph
 
On 18 Feb, 15:03, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Woland99 wrote:
> > Well definitely I am over 200 pounds now and by quite a WIDE
> > margin. I used to ski so I have strong leg muscles so I can
> > do some hills now even with all that extra weight. Altho fact
> > is you cannot fool you knees. And even if I go down to my
> > college/rock climbing weight (which will take a a year or so)
> > I will still be close to 200 - about 185-190.
> > So in the meantime I thought about cyclocross bike - maybe
> > sth hybrid like Bianchi Axis?

>
> There is a world-class sprinter, Thor Hushovd, who weighs about the
> same as you and he races superlight carbon road bikes. I prolly have
> weighed as much as you by a bit in the past (now stay within +/- 10
> lbs of 200) and I have ridden many different bikes of different
> materials, some pretty lightweight. Like others said, stay away from
> stoopidlight.
>
> You COULD get a bike that would be suitable for you both now and when
> you get down to fighting weight but it will most likely cost some
> coin. Course, buying two bikes (the cross now, another one later)
> will cost some coin too ;) .
>
> There are frames out there that would support you well now and not
> beat you to death later. Thor rides a Look, but that's kinda
> spendy. I have ridden a Fuji Professional Carbon at around 220 lbs.
> and found it plenty stiff for climbing. The Fuji carbon frames
> represent a very high performance/dollar ratio, IMO. I also ride a
> Storck C1.1, a Schwinn Paramount titanium, and a Schwinn SuperSport.
> When I weighed 250+, I rode a Klein Stage, which was more stiff than I
> needed.
>
> D'ohBoy


Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.

FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy. I only test rode
them, so no long term impressions.

I'd steer away from carbon fiber.

Just getting into the swing of things, your tastes and ideas about how
you ride, and what sort of gear you want/need will change rather
quickly. So you will probably want to change out whatever you get now
in a year anyway, so that't maybe something to keep in mind.

Joseph
 
On Feb 18, 7:00 am, Woland99 <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> I consider getting cyclocross bike as a step toward road bike but
> perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?


Why get a road bike if you're not racing? A "cross" bike, meaning
something like a Kona Jake or Bianchi Volpe--cyclocross tendencies but
with braze-ons for most any accessory and with fantastic tire
clearances, these are the do-all bikes that are easiest to find today.
Strong and no-nonsense. If you really have the fast bug, have some
light wheels built and run 28mm slicks on sunny days. Most of today's
road bikes are pointless affectation, IMHO. Saving a couple pounds
here or there makes little difference to a recreational rider, but a
good comfy cockpit and confidence that the bike isn't too fragile does
make a difference.

I was out with my buddy yesterday and we were riding some not-
officially-open-yet greenways with lots of detritus. I was on my
hybrid anticipating this, and he was on his new Jake the Snake.
Gravel, glass patches, grass, no problem. Then we saw a neighbor
limping home his Bianchi road bike with two half flats as he'd run out
of CO2. We got him fixed up--but it just struck me as absurd riding
23mm tires on a high zoot bike, when what you really want is
reasonably fast, and reliable. I managed to hit a hidden 2" squared
off lip of concrete at over 20mph, which would have destroyed a skinny
tire. Did manage to put a flat spot in my rims...which is what I'm
avoiding fixing by typing this...but I didn't puncture and didn't even
have to stop.
 
Woland99 wrote:
> I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> I consider getting cyclocross bike as a step toward road bike but
> perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?


Limitation's in the wheels not the frame. Regular tubular wheels should
be reliable for a 250-280lb rider on reasonable roads. Past that, you'd
probably want wider tires than can fit in the bike.

There aren't hard limits. Some XXL riders have great success with
regular race equipment and some light riders beat the hell out of wheels.
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org
Open every day since 1 April, 1971
 
[email protected] wrote:

> Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.


Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.

> FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.


Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
rather squishy.

> I'd steer away from carbon fiber.


Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
titanium.

D'ohBoy
 
On Feb 18, 3:44 pm, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.

>
> Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
> either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.
>
> > FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.

>
> Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
> rather squishy.
>
> > I'd steer away from carbon fiber.

>
> Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
> appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
> steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
> on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
> titanium.
>
> D'ohBoy


Is there anyone making ti frames that would fail first ride on someone
in this category? I know there's a lot more to the frame than the
material, but I would be surprised to find someone is making complete
garbage ti frames, the material is just too expensive.

I know some BMXers who won't consider riding carbon, citing flex when
and where they are not comfy with flex. 2 of them are or were pro
level riders, sponsorships and all. Both are better riders than I
will ever be. One of them is currently top 5 in the pros and on his
way to the Worlds in China as we speak, and lining up for the 2012 X
games. If carbon feels flimsy to these guys, there's a reason. When
you ride your bike every damn day because it's your job you tend to
learn things.

That said, I have a slightly different opinion on carbon. My first
carbon part was an answer BMX fork for my Mosh race bike. At the time
I said I'd never ride carbon, and then I got bit by the weight weenie
bug and bought a set. I thought they felt flimsy, especially when
compared to the chromo forks I was used to. Then it happened, I cased
a double out of turn 2 spinning out my 45x16. I wrecked hard, and I
felt something on the bike break as I went over the bars. I'd bent
and broken forks in the past, and knew beyond doubt that I had just
done in another set.

As I lay there hurt, I thought to myself "Great, there go those
forks. That was an expensive crash, especially since I've only had
them 1 month". I then picked myself up and grabbed the bike off of
the track, so no other racers hit it and crashed. As I picked it up
by the bars I felt something off, verifying the forks were done. On
the sidelines I couldn't find the crack, but I could certainly feel
it. I was already dead last in the moto so I just rolled the rest of
the track to avoid the DNF and went over to the spot to tear it down,
hoping someone on my team or my manager had an extra set of forks. We
could bike shuffle for the last heat (by crashing I made sure I wasn't
going to the finals), but that's a pain.

Turns out the forks were not broken. Some of the bearings in the
headset were!! I cased that jump so hard I broke bearings in the
headset, more than I had ever broken in the past even when destroying
chromo forks!!!

So, to me the story is this: Carbon may flex and feel squirrelly
where you don't want it to. That said, it can still be damn strong.
I've still got those forks, and though I now know they're strong
enough for my dirt jumping bike I wouldn't put them there. If I built
up another BMX race bike, however, they'd go right on.

Dan
 
[email protected] wrote:
> On Feb 18, 3:44 pm, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> [email protected] wrote:
>>> Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.

>> Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
>> either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.
>>
>>> FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.

>> Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
>> rather squishy.
>>
>>> I'd steer away from carbon fiber.

>> Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
>> appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
>> steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
>> on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
>> titanium.
>>
>> D'ohBoy

>
> Is there anyone making ti frames that would fail first ride on someone
> in this category? I know there's a lot more to the frame than the
> material, but I would be surprised to find someone is making complete
> garbage ti frames, the material is just too expensive.



Would you feel comfortable putting a 100 kg guy on a 790 gram Ghisallo
frame?

Lou
 
On Feb 18, 5:42 pm, Lou Holtman <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > On Feb 18, 3:44 pm, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> [email protected] wrote:
> >>> Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.
> >> Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
> >> either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.

>
> >>> FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.
> >> Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
> >> rather squishy.

>
> >>> I'd steer away from carbon fiber.
> >> Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
> >> appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
> >> steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
> >> on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
> >> titanium.

>
> >> D'ohBoy

>
> > Is there anyone making ti frames that would fail first ride on someone
> > in this category? I know there's a lot more to the frame than the
> > material, but I would be surprised to find someone is making complete
> > garbage ti frames, the material is just too expensive.

>
> Would you feel comfortable putting a 100 kg guy on a 790 gram Ghisallo
> frame?
>
> Lou- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


I'm honestly not sure, which is why I was asking. My question was
earnest. I am not sure the model, but I do know a 210lb (95KG) guy
who rode a ti litespeed for a couple years without problems. It
didn't fail until he rode it into a car (his version varies a bit, but
there's no debating the bike & car impact, only fault). While I don't
claim to be intimately familiar with the Ghisallo, I'd be shocked if
it "folded beneath him on his first ride", however, which is the claim
that was made. I'm damn near 100KG myself, and I ride my steel framed
road bike offroad, on singletrack. I crash it sometimes. I hop
curbs, and have been known to play (lightly) in the skate park. I
would not think the Ghisallo would live all that long under my abuse,
but that's different than folding on the first ride.
 
On Feb 18, 6:00�am, Woland99 <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> I consider getting cyclocross �bike as a step toward road bike but
> perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?


Consider a good touring bike. It should be of stronger construction
and, if sized right, could be something to use and enjoy for the rest
of your days.

Tom
 
On Feb 18, 7:00 am, Woland99 <[email protected]> wrote:
> I know that roadie suppose to be skinny but not everybody is.
> Or at least not yet. I am shopping for a road bike (have MTB) now
> and I cannot find any info on what would be reasonable "max load".
> I consider getting cyclocross bike as a step toward road bike but
> perhaps somebody here knows - what would be max rider weight
> that eg. Masi Gran Corsa can carry?


Folks - many thanks for all the input. I learnt a lot and it is good
to find such active and friendly forum (that was my first post here).
Tomorrow I will go check couple Bianchi bikes - Volpe and perhaps
Axis.
It does not seem that any LCB has Kono Jake in stock. I will also look
at Surlys and perhaps Masi Speciale CX. Comparing different models
takes some time for me since I do not have a lot of knowledge about
components or often basic tech vocabulary. But there is always
Sheldon's
website and wikipedia. Thanks again - I will report on my progress.
 
info given suggests 300 pounds for a lugged carbon steel japanese-
tiwanese frame from the '80's-a frame speced by Shedon Brwon as "a
cheap asian improt"
improvements on the CAI ridden here: CR-18/WheelMfg solid axles/25
bearings/Conti touring or commuting tires and home made racks
carry 100 pounds rear rack, 40-50 pounds front rack at cautious
downhill or downwind speeds on smooth surfaces without problema.
At those capacities, a paint experiment trying to coax flourescent
paint into not absolving into flat paint, showed paint cracks on the
seat stays.
rider is 165 pounds.
morals are: upgraded system carries a heavier load than the system is
capable of handling as a bicycle system producing acceptable
directional stability, forward motion v expended energy.
bringing the memory of supplies and weapons traveling down the Ho Chi
Min Trail on bicycles and other 3rd world photos available on the
internet.
 
On 18 Feb, 21:44, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.

>
> Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
> either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.


No doubt.

>
> > FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.

>
> Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
> rather squishy.


As I said, it was only a short test. So I suppose it could have been
the wheels, the salesman's deodorant, or any of an infinite other
number of factors that skewed my opinion.

>
> > I'd steer away from carbon fiber.

>
> Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
> appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
> steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
> on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
> titanium.


Because IMO carbon fiber is unecceasarily delicate and usually not
worth the added expense. The advantage of CF is being able to make
super-light and stiff frames, but this usually only happens at the top
end of the price scale. Less expensive frames don't seem to manage
both light weight and stiffness, so what is the point?

That is of course a broad generalization, and my main reason to
suggest avoiding CF is to get a LOT more bike for the money in most
cases. There is a premium for CF bikes that IMO is only really
justified in the high price range, and the high price range in itself
is hardly justified in terms of performance alone.

Joseph
 
On 18 Feb, 23:42, Lou Holtman <[email protected]> wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
> > On Feb 18, 3:44 pm, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> [email protected] wrote:
> >>> Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.
> >> Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
> >> either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.

>
> >>> FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.
> >> Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
> >> rather squishy.

>
> >>> I'd steer away from carbon fiber.
> >> Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
> >> appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
> >> steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
> >> on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
> >> titanium.

>
> >> D'ohBoy

>
> > Is there anyone making ti frames that would fail first ride on someone
> > in this category? I know there's a lot more to the frame than the
> > material, but I would be surprised to find someone is making complete
> > garbage ti frames, the material is just too expensive.

>
> Would you feel comfortable putting a 100 kg guy on a 790 gram Ghisallo
> frame?
>
> Lou


I would be. Send me one. ;-)

Joseph
 
On Feb 19, 2:42 am, "[email protected]"
<[email protected]> wrote:
> On 18 Feb, 21:44, "D'ohBoy" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > [email protected] wrote:
> > > Thor is only about 180lbs (80kg). Magnus Backsted is about 200lbs.

>
> > Oops. Yes, Backstedt is who I meant, although I would suggest that
> > either he or Thor will abuse a frame more than the OP will.

>
> No doubt.
>
>
>
> > > FWIW I found the Fuji carbon bikes rather squishy.

>
> > Huh. Yah, you've said that before. I find your below assertion
> > rather squishy.

>
> As I said, it was only a short test. So I suppose it could have been
> the wheels, the salesman's deodorant, or any of an infinite other
> number of factors that skewed my opinion.
>
>
>
> > > I'd steer away from carbon fiber.

>
> > Why? What would you steer him toward? I think there are many
> > appropriate frames for the OP's size in carbon as well as aluminum,
> > steel, or titanium. As well as frames that would fold underneath him
> > on his first ride manufactured of carbon or aluminum, or steel, or
> > titanium.

>
> Because IMO carbon fiber is unecceasarily delicate and usually not
> worth the added expense. The advantage of CF is being able to make
> super-light and stiff frames, but this usually only happens at the top
> end of the price scale. Less expensive frames don't seem to manage
> both light weight and stiffness, so what is the point?
>
> That is of course a broad generalization, and my main reason to
> suggest avoiding CF is to get a LOT more bike for the money in most
> cases. There is a premium for CF bikes that IMO is only really
> justified in the high price range, and the high price range in itself
> is hardly justified in terms of performance alone.
>
> Joseph


Actually I was really tempted by Cannondale Synapse Carbon 2 at LBS.
It was on sale for $1500 and it was soooo light! But my common sense
kept saying "look at these rims - now look at your gut - now look at
these rims". Salesman told me that it is designed to withstand 300lbs
static load - not sure if that means it will fold at 325 or a 300lbs
person can take it on the road...