Max tension bontrager at-750 2mm steel spokes?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Verve2, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Verve2

    Verve2 New Member

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    Around a year ago I got a Trek Verve2. Has Bontrager AT-750 rims, 292mm round steel spokes. I've been reading up on wheel truing and it's got me wondering about max tension.

    Consensus seems to be that the drive side on this kind of wheel will have higher tension to maintain dishing. Using a Park TM-1 while truing the rim for the first time since I got the bike I'm getting readings around 27-28 on the drive side which per their chart is in the 135-153 Kgf range which seems high going by what I'm finding searching online. So far I haven't found any specific recommendations on this specific Bontrager rim. Possibly worth noting that I'm 6'4", around 275 lbs.

    I called the Dave's World Cycle where I got the bike and asked what they regarded as a typical tension and their answer after consulting with the tech on duty was they don't have an answer. They said they only use the tension meter on higher end wheels. Okee doke.

    What are your thoughts?
     
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  2. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    It seems to be a fairly basic wheel.
    I see them in both 32H and 36H.
    150 is definitely very high for those spoke counts.
    That’s usually found on about 24-spoke wheels.
    With no other data, a common recommendation is 110 kg DS, IF that gives a NDS of 60 kg or more.
    Otherwise, increase until you reach 60 kg NDS, unless the rim begins to buckle.
    At your weight, I might consider going for 120 kg DS, but that’s about it. Spokes can be replaced eventually, a cracked rim is scrap.
    While it’s true that spoke tension is less important on high spoke count wheels, the attitude of the shop is kinda sloppy.
    When I build a wheel, I build it to last, regardless of pricepoint.
    And the correct spoke tension certainly helps with that.
     
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