Max Tire size on Modern frame



W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Thu, 08 Jul 2004 19:45:54 -0700, Robert Masse <[email protected]>
wrote:

>
>http://tinyurl.com/2zfcg


Supergo uses actively scripted pages; that link leads only to their
index page; the rest of the URL was probably buried in a cookie.

>Will a 700c x 28 tire fit on the rear of this frame? The frame is a
>size 60. I normally buy IRC duro road tires in size 28 and the rim
>is a 700c open pro (if that even matters).


Frame size often has little impact on max tire width capability; the
chainstay spacing may be the limiting factor, and it won't usually
change with frame dimensions. That said, the only way to find out
about the clearance will be to ask for specific dimensional
information...and bear in mind that when going from one tire brand or
model to another, 700x28 may not be the same actual size of tire.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Surrealism is a pectinated ranzel.
 
M

Mark Hickey

Guest
Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote:

Robert Masse <[email protected]>wrote:

>>Will a 700c x 28 tire fit on the rear of this frame? The frame is a
>>size 60. I normally buy IRC duro road tires in size 28 and the rim
>>is a 700c open pro (if that even matters).

>
>Frame size often has little impact on max tire width capability; the
>chainstay spacing may be the limiting factor, and it won't usually
>change with frame dimensions. That said, the only way to find out
>about the clearance will be to ask for specific dimensional
>information...and bear in mind that when going from one tire brand or
>model to another, 700x28 may not be the same actual size of tire.


Normally the limitation on tire size is the position of the brake
bridge. It has to be low enough to allow the current crop of very low
reach calipers to work, which limits the maximum size of tire that
will fit. If a custom frame customer is willing to use longer
calipers I'll raise the brake bridge accordingly.

Of course, I'm talking about tire "height", but since they're all
basically round it's kinda the same.

Some builders don't relieve the front inside of the chainstays to
allow extra lateral clearance, and that too can be a limitation.
Remember that the issue isn't how large a tire will clear the
chainstays, but how large a tire will clear the chainstays with a
broken spoke.

Mark Hickey
Habanero Cycles
http://www.habcycles.com
Home of the $695 ti frame
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Fri, 09 Jul 2004 07:13:48 -0700, Mark Hickey <[email protected]>
wrote:

>Normally the limitation on tire size is the position of the brake
>bridge.


Thanks, I sometimes don't think about the fact that late roadie
calipers have been downsized to the point where they will barely clear
the tires. (I *should* be thinking about it, I got bit by that
recently, but the mind slips.)

> It has to be low enough to allow the current crop of very low
>reach calipers to work, which limits the maximum size of tire that
>will fit. If a custom frame customer is willing to use longer
>calipers I'll raise the brake bridge accordingly.
>
>Of course, I'm talking about tire "height", but since they're all
>basically round it's kinda the same.
>
>Some builders don't relieve the front inside of the chainstays to
>allow extra lateral clearance, and that too can be a limitation.


This is the problem I've encountered more often; it can appear even on
older frames with a high brake bridge, but since the OP was inquiring
about a new frame, your observation is probably even more relevant.

>Remember that the issue isn't how large a tire will clear the
>chainstays, but how large a tire will clear the chainstays with a
>broken spoke.


Particularly if the wheels have less than 32 to begin with.
--
Typoes are a feature, not a bug.
Some gardening required to reply via email.
Surrealism is a pectinated ranzel.