Maxarya update

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by John Riley, Mar 12, 2003.

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  1. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    I stopped by Max's office yesterday to see how things were going.

    Max _did not_ have a bike at his booth at the Toronto bike show on Friday when I was by. Apparently
    they got hung up in customs, but he says he did have bikes there for Sat. and Sun. He had about ten
    bikes around the office in various stages of assembly. Apparently he has started shipping a few to
    dealers. He expects a larger shipment in two weeks.

    I know many of you don't care for CLWB bikes, especially over-engineered ones, and this is not the
    bike I would have designed, but I was impressed with the final version of this bike.

    Max is the sort of guy who has bike parts all around his office and drawings of future projects on
    the walls. He can hardly look at something mechanical for more than a few minutes without thinking
    about how it might be done better. I think he probably drove his suppliers nuts, but I think the
    bike is better for it.

    I am no engineer, but here are some of the details that I thought were interesting. The crossover
    sprockets are fairly small, so Max found some stainless steel ones for durability. The rear
    derailleur cable runs through the chainstay. On earlier prototypes, the suspension pivot was
    concentric with the crossover; now it is above the crossover axle. The pivot/BB area look very
    robust and apparently is quite difficult to make. The kickstand doesn't clamp on; it bolts securely
    to a braze-on. The rear derailleur hanger/dropout is replaceable. The replaceable bit is CNC
    machined. Max was in the proccess of re-designing the bracket so it would take an off the shelf
    item. Seat clamp is aluminum on aluminum, very tight tolerances; no plastic as on the prototype.
    Both bikes come with braze-ons for disk or rim brakes. Upper model has disks standard. The shock on
    the base model has adjustable rebound. The other model has a Cane Creek shock. The large diameter
    handlebar riser is stiff, not flexy. Seat base is vastly improved over the first one I tried. Max
    spend a lot of time and money on molds for this. I won't know how it works for me until I spend a
    couple hours on it, but a couple minutes was too much on the first one.

    Current accessories include a seat back bag and fenders. Rear rack will follow shortly.

    Toronto is still in the grip of winter, so I did not test ride, and as I say, at this point, it
    would really take a longer ride to judge the bike now.

    To me, this bike has much of the sophistication of a Bigha or Cannondale, but at at least ten pounds
    less weight and at prices that are closer to BikeE (suspended) prices.

    I have no commercial interest, and as I say, it is not the bike I would have made, but at this point
    I am impressed enough that I would not rule out owning one for some of my riding.

    Site is here: http://www.maxarya.com/

    Bikes in the pics are close to the final but don't go by the pics for details. I would say if anyone
    is interested, they shouldn't bother contacting Max; he doesn't sell direct. They should try to get
    their dealer to get one in.

    Sorry if this is overly commercial. As I say, I have no financial interest in this project. But it
    has been interesting to see the process up close (similar to watching sausage being made ;-) and I
    hope Max is able to make a go of it. Once he gets further into the recumbent community, you all
    might be able to get him to do something more performance oriented.

    John Riley
     
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  2. Alpha Beta

    Alpha Beta Guest

    How can they be hung up in customs when they are made in Canada?

    "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I stopped by Max's office yesterday to see how things were going.
    >
    > Max _did not_ have a bike at his booth at the Toronto bike show on Friday when I was by.
    > Apparently they got hung up in customs, but he says he did have bikes there for Sat. and Sun. He
    > had about ten bikes around the office in various stages of assembly. Apparently he has started
    > shipping a few to dealers. He expects a larger shipment in two weeks.
    >
    > I know many of you don't care for CLWB bikes, especially over-engineered ones, and this is not the
    > bike I would have designed, but I was impressed with the final version of this bike.
    >
    > Max is the sort of guy who has bike parts all around his office and drawings of future projects on
    > the walls. He can hardly look at something mechanical for more than a few minutes without thinking
    > about how it might be done better. I think he probably drove his suppliers nuts, but I think the
    > bike is better for it.
    >
    > I am no engineer, but here are some of the details that I thought were interesting. The crossover
    > sprockets are fairly small, so Max found some stainless steel ones for durability. The rear
    > derailleur cable runs through the chainstay. On earlier prototypes, the suspension pivot was
    > concentric with the crossover; now it is above the crossover axle. The pivot/BB area look very
    > robust and apparently is quite difficult to make. The kickstand doesn't clamp on; it bolts
    > securely to a braze-on. The rear derailleur hanger/dropout is replaceable. The replaceable bit is
    > CNC machined. Max was in the proccess of re-designing the bracket so it would take an off the
    > shelf item. Seat clamp is aluminum on aluminum, very tight tolerances; no plastic as on the
    > prototype. Both bikes come with braze-ons for disk or rim brakes. Upper model has disks standard.
    > The shock on the base model has adjustable rebound. The other model has a Cane Creek shock. The
    > large diameter handlebar riser is stiff, not flexy. Seat base is vastly improved over the first
    > one I tried. Max spend a lot of time and money on molds for this. I won't know how it works for me
    > until I spend a couple hours on it, but a couple minutes was too much on the first one.
    >
    > Current accessories include a seat back bag and fenders. Rear rack will follow shortly.
    >
    > Toronto is still in the grip of winter, so I did not test ride, and as I say, at this point, it
    > would really take a longer ride to judge the bike now.
    >
    > To me, this bike has much of the sophistication of a Bigha or Cannondale, but at at least ten
    > pounds less weight and at prices that are closer to BikeE (suspended) prices.
    >
    > I have no commercial interest, and as I say, it is not the bike I would have made, but at this
    > point I am impressed enough that I would not rule out owning one for some of my riding.
    >
    > Site is here: http://www.maxarya.com/
    >
    > Bikes in the pics are close to the final but don't go by the pics for details. I would say if
    > anyone is interested, they shouldn't bother contacting Max; he doesn't sell direct. They should
    > try to get their dealer to get one in.
    >
    > Sorry if this is overly commercial. As I say, I have no financial interest in this project. But it
    > has been interesting to see the process up close (similar to watching sausage being made ;-) and I
    > hope Max is able to make a go of it. Once he gets further into the recumbent community, you all
    > might be able to get him to do something more performance oriented.
    >
    > John Riley
     
  3. John Riley

    John Riley Guest

    Max is based in Toronto, and he deisgned the bikes here, but they are made in Taiwan.

    Alpha Beta wrote:
    >
    > How can they be hung up in customs when they are made in Canada?
     
  4. You caught that too. I assumed the CLWB was in the USA on display, but I'm curious if it was coming
    in from Taiwan.... John we need answers here.
    ------------------------------------
    "Alpha Beta" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > How can they be hung up in customs when they are made in Canada?
    >
    > "John Riley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I stopped by Max's office yesterday to see how things were going.
    > >
    > > Max _did not_ have a bike at his booth at the Toronto bike show on Friday when I was by.
    > > Apparently they got hung up in customs, but he says he did have bikes there for Sat. and Sun. He
    > > had about ten bikes around the office in various stages of assembly. Apparently he has started
    > > shipping a few to dealers. He expects a larger shipment in two weeks.
    > >
    > > I know many of you don't care for CLWB bikes, especially over-engineered ones, and this is not
    > > the bike I would have designed, but I was impressed with the final version of this bike.
    > >
    > > Max is the sort of guy who has bike parts all around his office and drawings of future projects
    > > on the walls. He can hardly look at something mechanical for more than a few minutes without
    > > thinking about how it might be done better. I think he probably drove his suppliers nuts, but I
    > > think the bike is better for it.
    > >
    > > I am no engineer, but here are some of the details that I thought were interesting. The
    > > crossover sprockets are fairly small, so Max found some stainless steel ones for durability.
    > > The rear derailleur cable runs through the chainstay. On earlier prototypes, the suspension
    > > pivot was concentric with the crossover; now it is above the crossover axle. The pivot/BB area
    > > look very robust and apparently is quite difficult to make. The kickstand doesn't clamp on; it
    > > bolts securely to a braze-on. The rear derailleur hanger/dropout is replaceable. The
    > > replaceable bit is CNC machined. Max was in the proccess of re-designing the bracket so it
    > > would take an off the shelf item. Seat clamp is aluminum on aluminum, very tight tolerances; no
    > > plastic as on the prototype. Both bikes come with braze-ons for disk or rim brakes. Upper model
    > > has disks standard. The shock on the base model has adjustable rebound. The other model has a
    > > Cane Creek shock. The large diameter handlebar riser is stiff, not flexy. Seat base is vastly
    > > improved over the first one I tried. Max spend a lot of time and money on molds for this. I
    > > won't know how it works for me until I spend a couple hours on it, but a couple minutes was too
    > > much on the first one.
    > >
    > > Current accessories include a seat back bag and fenders. Rear rack will follow shortly.
    > >
    > > Toronto is still in the grip of winter, so I did not test ride, and as I say, at this point, it
    > > would really take a longer ride to judge the bike now.
    > >
    > > To me, this bike has much of the sophistication of a Bigha or Cannondale, but at at least ten
    > > pounds less weight and at prices that are closer to BikeE (suspended) prices.
    > >
    > > I have no commercial interest, and as I say, it is not the bike I would have made, but at this
    > > point I am impressed enough that I would not rule out owning one for some of my riding.
    > >
    > > Site is here: http://www.maxarya.com/
    > >
    > > Bikes in the pics are close to the final but don't go by the pics for details. I would say if
    > > anyone is interested, they shouldn't bother contacting Max; he doesn't sell direct. They should
    > > try to get their dealer to get one in.
    > >
    > > Sorry if this is overly commercial. As I say, I have no financial interest in this project. But
    > > it has been interesting to see the process up close (similar to watching sausage being made ;-)
    > > and I hope Max is able to make a go of it. Once he gets further into the recumbent community,
    > > you all might be able to get him to do something more performance oriented.
    > >
    > > John Riley
     
  5. Simon

    Simon New Member

    Joined:
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    I live in Toronto outskirt and have been looking to buy a CLWB recumbent. I had a bikeE for three years. I enjoyed it but not a perfect bike...I visited the show and checked the bikes out...They are really impressive. Why should I pay 40-50% more for something the same quality and not as stylish as Maxarya's?

    I enjoyed the test ride and believe the bike is very refined and classy. The seat is very well done...go and try one. I like these guys cuz they know what they are doing and kowledgeable enough to convince any hard headed rider like me!
    I think Max's is doing fine and will succeed.
     
  6. Agreed
    -------
    "Simon" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I live in Toronto outskirt and have been looking to buy a CLWB recumbent. I had a bikeE for three
    > years. I enjoyed it but not a perfect bike...I visited the show and checked the bikes out...They
    > are really impressive. Why should I pay 40-50% more for something the same quality and not as
    > stylish as Maxarya's?
    >
    > I enjoyed the test ride and believe the bike is very refined and classy. The seat is very well
    > done...go and try one. I like these guys cuz they know what they are doing and kowledgeable enough
    > to convince any hard headed rider like me! I think Max's is doing fine and will succeed.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > >--------------------------<
    > Posted via cyclingforums.com http://www.cyclingforums.com
     
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