McDonald's Fries

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by jay, Feb 16, 2006.



  1. Man, that is bad news for a lot of people...
     
  2. Bob Myers

    Bob Myers Guest

  3. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

  4. Doug Kanter wrote:
    > "jay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:p[email protected]
    >
    >>MickDonald's does it to you again.
    >>
    >>http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/diet.fitness/02/15/mcdonald.s.fries.ap/index.html

    >
    > The dietary issues are the least of your problems when you eat those.
    > McDonald's insists on absolutely perfect potatoes from their suppliers. None
    > of those little dark spots that you and I would just eat around or cut away
    > at home.
    >
    > Guess how they get those perfect potatoes?


    Witchcraft...?

    I give. How do they get those perfect potatoes? I bet it's going to be
    some sinister plot...

    Pastorio
     
  5. jay wrote:
    >
    > MickDonald's does it to you again.
    >
    > http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/diet.fitness/02/15/mcdonald.s.fries.ap/index.html


    Oh, bullshit. Read the whole thing. They can say it's gluten-free
    because there's no protein component to the flavoring agents which are
    *derivatives* of wheat and dairy.

    Has there been a massive outbreak of allergic reactions to their fries?
    A sudden run on epipens? And where's the media when huge stories like
    this break...

    The bastids...

    Pastorio
     
  6. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Doug Kanter wrote:
    >> "jay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:p[email protected]
    >>
    >>>MickDonald's does it to you again.
    >>>
    >>>http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/diet.fitness/02/15/mcdonald.s.fries.ap/index.html

    >>
    >> The dietary issues are the least of your problems when you eat those.
    >> McDonald's insists on absolutely perfect potatoes from their suppliers.
    >> None of those little dark spots that you and I would just eat around or
    >> cut away at home.
    >>
    >> Guess how they get those perfect potatoes?

    >
    > Witchcraft...?
    >
    > I give. How do they get those perfect potatoes? I bet it's going to be
    > some sinister plot...
    >
    > Pastorio


    I guess it depends on what falls under your definition of sinister. Really,
    it's an astounding variety of pesticides & fungicides, applied almost
    constantly throughout the growing season. Way beyond what's used on most
    other crops. Some farmers won't eat the potatoes they grow for McDonald's.
     
  7. Henhouse

    Henhouse Guest

    MickeyD's does absolutely nothing to me, again. Why? Because I don't eat
    there. Hard to fathom how an NG like this spends so much time discussing
    stuff we don't eat, and would never dream of eating. OK, I'm eliteist.
    So sue me ;)

    Jo
     
  8. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Doug Canter wrote:

    > > http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/diet.fitness/02/15/mcdonald.s.fries.ap/index.html

    >
    > The dietary issues are the least of your problems when you eat those.
    > McDonald's insists on absolutely perfect potatoes from their suppliers. None
    > of those little dark spots that you and I would just eat around or cut away
    > at home.
    >


    It seems a little ironic to me that McDonalds would insist on perfect potatoes where
    their food is so far from perfects. I realize that they sell billions of burgers, but
    mass appeal, especially with their special appeal to children and teens does nothing
    to enhance my view of their products. I will take those roughly chopped fries from a
    chip truck over the golden arches fries any day.
     
  9. Mr. G D Geen

    Mr. G D Geen Guest

    Henhouse wrote:
    > MickeyD's does absolutely nothing to me, again. Why? Because I don't eat
    > there. Hard to fathom how an NG like this spends so much time discussing
    > stuff we don't eat, and would never dream of eating. OK, I'm eliteist.
    > So sue me ;)
    >
    > Jo

    Alright Jo. If you don't hear from my lawyers soon, call me. :)

    I must agree. Don't eat there -- probably never will. -G
     
  10. I guess you could say there's a sort of perfection in all categories,
    even when the category is crap.
     
  11. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 17:17:11 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The dietary issues are the least of your problems when you eat those.
    >McDonald's insists on absolutely perfect potatoes from their suppliers. None
    >of those little dark spots that you and I would just eat around or cut away
    >at home.


    McDonalds uses a sophisticated electronic visual inspection
    process. The fries go through a conveyor and the video system
    identifies fries with blemishes. The video system then calculates
    trajectory and blows the offending fry off the conveyer with a
    carefully directed blast of air from a robotic air gun.

    >Guess how they get those perfect potatoes?


    They grow them?

    -sw
     
  12. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 18:37:39 GMT, "Doug Kanter"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I guess it depends on what falls under your definition of sinister. Really,
    >it's an astounding variety of pesticides & fungicides, applied almost
    >constantly throughout the growing season.


    Like this is any different than another other commercial farm? It
    ain't.

    -sw
     
  13. Doug Kanter wrote:

    > it's an astounding variety of pesticides & fungicides, applied almost
    > constantly throughout the growing season. Way beyond what's used on most
    > other crops. Some farmers won't eat the potatoes they grow for McDonald's.


    Here McD's has refused GM spuds.
    <http://www.biotech-info.net/decisions_fastfood.html>

    Here, Australian farmers are threatening to boycott McD's if they don't
    buy more potatoes. <http://tinyurl.com/9ffwo>

    "If the McDonald's made a deal long ago to help Ray Kroc's personal
    friend expand the production of his potato farm, in turn for loyalty to
    sell to McDonald's, then that is totally fair (speaking of Simplot of
    ID). Even if, McDonald's pays 2 cents more per potato now. You see, the
    potato farmer is reaping the rewards for helping Ray Kroc in the
    beginning; build the McDonald's brand name."
    <http://readerfeed.com/branding/29872.html>

    Hmmm. Here's a story that supports your contention.
    <http://www.mcspotlight.org/media/press/potatoes.html>

    This story says the potatoes aren't perfect.
    "Scalding steam explodes brown skins. Workers with stubby knives gouge
    out black spots. [...] High-pressure water blasts potatoes at 35 mph
    through a pipe into brass blades arranged in a quarter-inch grid. [...]
    Laser-guided knives whack imperfections from the raw shoestring fries."
    <http://tinyurl.com/7bjdd>

    This story says that while russets require more fertilizer and
    pesticides, production is heading into other varieties.
    "The predominant variety for many decades, both for processing and fresh
    markets, has been Russet Burbank, which accounted for 65% of the western
    U.S. potato acreage in the early 1980's but less than 50% in 2004. [...]

    "Russet Burbank produces oblong to long, russet-skinned tubers with
    moderately high solids, has long-storage dormancy, and produces
    excellent baked and processed products. Despite these strengths, Russet
    Burbank has serious weaknesses. Russet Burbank is susceptible to
    Verticillium wilt, early blight, late blight, most potato viruses
    (including leafroll net necrosis), and some physiological disorders
    including hollow heart, brown center, internal brown spot, blackspot
    bruise, and dark-end fries caused by sugar accumulation in tuber stem
    ends when the crop is stressed. It is much more susceptible than most
    modern varieties to knobs, off-shapes, and internal and external defects
    associated with uneven growing conditions caused by fluctuating
    temperature and moisture. Serious quality reduction due to small tuber
    size and internal disorders aggravated by high temperatures is not
    uncommon for this variety.

    "Russet Burbank requires a high level of management, requiring more
    fertilizer, water, and pesticides than are required for varieties such
    as Bannock Russet, Alturas, and GemStar Russet - recent releases from
    the Northwest Tri-State Potato Variety Development Program."
    <http://tinyurl.com/c32jr>

    It seems that Russets take more care, but it seems that they return more
    than other varieties. It's that same kind of mixed blessing that so many
    other food sources generate. It falls under the "water balloon
    principle" I formulated years ago. When you squeeze a water-filled
    balloon, it bulges out somewhere else. So solve this problem, but create
    a new one over there somewhere.

    What John Campbell who was one of the great editors said: "You can't do
    just one thing."

    Who knew there were so many varieties of potatoes?

    Pastorio
     
  14. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Bob (this one)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here McD's has refused GM spuds.


    Admirable of them. :)

    I've been avoiding products made with yellow corn meal for the same
    reason.

    Even Taco Bell avoided yellow corn, their tortillas were made with only
    white corn for ages!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  15. "Doug Kanter" <[email protected]> hitched up their panties and
    posted news:[email protected]:

    >
    > Guess how they get those perfect potatoes?


    Oh Gawd. How?


    --
    “It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun.”
    _Ray Kroc, creator of the McDonald's franchise
     
  16. Bob Myers

    Bob Myers Guest

    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > It seems a little ironic to me that McDonalds would insist on perfect

    potatoes where
    > their food is so far from perfects. I realize that they sell billions of

    burgers, but
    > mass appeal, especially with their special appeal to children and teens

    does nothing
    > to enhance my view of their products. I will take those roughly chopped

    fries from a
    > chip truck over the golden arches fries any day.


    Actually, their food DOES come very much closer to
    "perfect" *for what it is supposed to be* than any of
    their competitors. Note, however, that in this context,
    "perfect" doesn't at ALL have to equate to "good" in terms
    of taste, nutrition, etc..

    I had the good fortune to be sitting next to a McDonald's exec
    on a trans-Pacific flight once; he was on his way to Australia
    and New Zealand to work out some deals with meat suppliers
    their for their Asian operations. Learned a lot about what
    Micky D's is all about, and you can basically sum it up in
    one word: consistency. McDonald's never is going to make the
    absolute best hamburger or whatever in the world, but
    they know that and that isn't really what they're shooting for.
    The point is to make a product that the public will buy, and
    then to make sure that that product is absolutely the same no
    matter what McDonald's you happen to walk into. And at
    least in my experience, in THAT sense they're the best in
    the world. No matter where I am - and I get around quite
    a bit on business - if I HAVE to go for "fast food," either
    due to a time crunch or just because I have no "known good"
    local options, I am likely to go to McD's. I never expect
    to have a "great" burger or whatever there, but I am always
    absolutely certain that whatever I DO get will be exactly the
    same in, say, Taipei as it is in Denver. And I can tell you from
    (bad) experience that a lot of their American-type competition
    in those same locations can't say the same thing.

    In that light, their demanding that their suppliers provide
    potatoes (or whatever) to some pretty tight specifications
    is very understandable.

    Bob M.
    >
    >
     
  17. Bob Myers wrote:

    >"Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >
    >>It seems a little ironic to me that McDonalds would insist on perfect
    >>
    >>

    >potatoes where
    >
    >
    >>their food is so far from perfects. I realize that they sell billions of
    >>
    >>

    >burgers, but
    >
    >
    >>mass appeal, especially with their special appeal to children and teens
    >>
    >>

    >does nothing
    >
    >
    >>to enhance my view of their products. I will take those roughly chopped
    >>
    >>

    >fries from a
    >
    >
    >>chip truck over the golden arches fries any day.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Actually, their food DOES come very much closer to
    >"perfect" *for what it is supposed to be* than any of
    >their competitors. Note, however, that in this context,
    >"perfect" doesn't at ALL have to equate to "good" in terms
    >of taste, nutrition, etc..
    >
    >I had the good fortune to be sitting next to a McDonald's exec
    >on a trans-Pacific flight once; he was on his way to Australia
    >and New Zealand to work out some deals with meat suppliers
    >their for their Asian operations. Learned a lot about what
    >Micky D's is all about, and you can basically sum it up in
    >one word: consistency. McDonald's never is going to make the
    >absolute best hamburger or whatever in the world, but
    >they know that and that isn't really what they're shooting for.
    >The point is to make a product that the public will buy, and
    >then to make sure that that product is absolutely the same no
    >matter what McDonald's you happen to walk into. And at
    >least in my experience, in THAT sense they're the best in
    >the world. No matter where I am - and I get around quite
    >a bit on business - if I HAVE to go for "fast food," either
    >due to a time crunch or just because I have no "known good"
    >local options, I am likely to go to McD's. I never expect
    >to have a "great" burger or whatever there, but I am always
    >absolutely certain that whatever I DO get will be exactly the
    >same in, say, Taipei as it is in Denver. And I can tell you from
    >(bad) experience that a lot of their American-type competition
    >in those same locations can't say the same thing.
    >
    >In that light, their demanding that their suppliers provide
    >potatoes (or whatever) to some pretty tight specifications
    >is very understandable.
    >
    >Bob M.
    >
    >
    >You are not wrong. The thing about Maccas is that no matter where you are you know exactly what you're getting, with very little risk of food poisoning thrown in for free. The traditional Aussie burger at its best is superior to a Big Mac, but you can be sadly disappointed a lot of the time.
    >
    >Have you heard of the practice of using the price of a Big Mac relative
    >to the average wage as a guide to a country's prosperity?
    >
    >

    Christine
     
  18. Denise~*

    Denise~* Guest

    Bob Myers wrote:

    > http://www.cnn.com/2006/HEALTH/diet.fitness/02/15/mcdonald.s.fries.ap/index.html
    >
    > OK, so how exactly does noting that the flavoring agents used
    > contain wheat and dairy DERIVATIVES automatically
    > equate to "the fries aren't gluten-free?"
    >
    > Bob M.
    >
    >


    Whey and casein, which are milk derivatives, will send my husband to the
    bathroom faster than you can count to 5.

    It matters.
     
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