Me and Joe Breeze

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Chris, Mar 8, 2004.

  1. Chris

    Chris Guest

    So swinging by College Park Bikes (CP, Maryland...UMD
    territory) last week I see the flyers proclaiming "Joe
    Breeze - Free Presentation or Something - Fri. 7 p.m., City
    Hall." How could I pass up a chance to hear what Breeze -
    the inventor of mtb (you heard me) and a hall of famer -has
    to say? That's right, I couldn't.

    So I left my apartment around 6:30, walking to City Hall -
    it was dark, and riding on Rt. 1 is crazy enough in the
    daylight, let alone after sunset. It was only around 4
    blocks. Anyway I get there around 6:45, walk on up to the
    council room dealie, and there's one guy in there fiddling
    with a projector and a laptop...but he had a Breezer polo
    shirt, so I knew I was on the right track. He sees me and
    says hey, I mention I'm here for the presentation...and
    something about "doesn't it start at seven?"

    The polo guy comes up, extends his hand, and says "What's
    your name?" I say, "Hey, I'm chris." He says, "Nice to meet
    you Chris...I'm Joe Breeze." I say, "Damn! I really feel
    like an ass for not recognizing you...of course, I haven't
    seen a photo since Repack." He says, "Hey, it's cool...I was
    a lot younger then...and there was more hair on my head.
    Come give me a hand with this projector."

    We then spent about ten minutes stacking trashcans, chairs,
    pulling picture frames off the wall trying to create an elevated-yet-
    stable platform for his projector. People began trickling
    in, and to my dismay 1) I was the only one under 30 there,
    2) the total audience numbered less than 30 people and
    3) the only people I recognized as cyclists there were
    guys that worked at CPBikes (excepting the crazy
    husband-and-wife duo constantly chiming in to
    champion folding bikes).

    Joe was there to discuss why bicycle commuting is the way
    to go, and, eventually, albeit less passionately, why his
    bikes are the bikes to do it on. As everyone knows, Joe
    is committed to the idea of a fit and efficient USA
    brought about by mass bike commuting and he got genuinely
    choked up at times - especially as he related biking to
    national pride.

    I was impressed at Joe's genuine, emotional commitment to
    his idea (which, obviously, we all agree with here) and his
    presentation - the new company and the new bikes were almost
    afterthoughts in his speech...he really was there to pimp
    commuting, not subject us to an infomercial. Also, the MD
    Secretary of Transportation was there, actively
    participating, taking notes, and interacting with the crowd,
    so that was good.

    It's not every day you get to abuse the College Park City
    Hall meeting room trying to get electronics set up with the
    inventor of mountain bikes. Word.

    Chris -Okay, fine, lots of guys were slamming down Repack,
    but Breeze put the fatties on first and, most importantly,
    built the first frame just for offroad riding. So there.
     
    Tags:


  2. Axis

    Axis Guest

    Very nice post. Thanks for sharing.
     
  3. Mattb

    Mattb Guest

    Chris wrote: <snip>
    > I was impressed at Joe's genuine, emotional commitment to
    > his idea (which, obviously, we all agree with here) and
    > his presentation - the new company and the new bikes were
    > almost afterthoughts in his speech...he really was there
    > to pimp commuting, not subject us to an infomercial. Also,
    > the MD Secretary of Transportation was there, actively
    > participating, taking notes, and interacting with the
    > crowd, so that was good.
    >

    That's cool. Sounds lke he's a passionate guy. Passion is
    great (when used for good and not evil).

    I'm also impressed it wasn't just a sales pitch. I think
    he's got the right idea as lifelong bike commuter myself.
    I'm not necessarily sold on his bikes, but the idea (althugh
    nothing new) is a message the masses should hear again. I
    think they forgot.

    Matt
     
  4. Chris

    Chris Guest

    "MattB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > That's cool. Sounds lke he's a passionate guy. Passion is
    > great (when used for good and not evil).
    >
    > I'm also impressed it wasn't just a sales pitch. I think
    > he's got the
    right
    > idea as lifelong bike commuter myself. I'm not necessarily
    > sold on his bikes, but the idea (althugh nothing new) is a
    > message the masses should hear again. I think they forgot.
    >
    > Matt

    His new bikes aren't going to appeal to most people here -
    they are commuter specific - but they are all fully equipped
    with lights (with a capacitor so they hold charge when the
    pedals stop), custom racks, a bell, a rear-wheel-lockout,
    reflective strips on the sidewalls, etc. Joe made the point,
    to a smattering of applause, that cars all come with -most
    of - these features, so why shouldn't bikes? Anyway, it was
    a great time.

    Chris
     
  5. Gazzer

    Gazzer Guest

  6. Chris wrote:

    > So swinging by College Park Bikes (CP, Maryland...UMD
    > territory) last week I see the flyers proclaiming "Joe
    > Breeze - Free Presentation or Something - Fri. 7 p.m.,
    > City Hall." How could I pass up a chance to hear what
    > Breeze - the inventor of mtb (you heard me) and a hall of
    > famer -has to say? That's right, I couldn't.
    >
    > So I left my apartment around 6:30, walking to City Hall -
    > it was dark, and riding on Rt. 1 is crazy enough in the
    > daylight, let alone after sunset. It was only around 4
    > blocks. Anyway I get there around 6:45, walk on up to the
    > council room dealie, and there's one guy in there fiddling
    > with a projector and a laptop...but he had a Breezer polo
    > shirt, so I knew I was on the right track. He sees me and
    > says hey, I mention I'm here for the presentation...and
    > something about "doesn't it start at seven?"
    >
    > The polo guy comes up, extends his hand, and says "What's
    > your name?" I say, "Hey, I'm chris." He says, "Nice to
    > meet you Chris...I'm Joe Breeze." I say, "Damn! I really
    > feel like an ass for not recognizing you...of course, I
    > haven't seen a photo since Repack." He says, "Hey, it's
    > cool...I was a lot younger then...and there was more hair
    > on my head. Come give me a hand with this projector."
    >
    > We then spent about ten minutes stacking trashcans,
    > chairs, pulling picture frames off the wall trying to
    > create an elevated-yet-stable platform for his projector.
    > People began trickling in, and to my dismay 1) I was the
    > only one under 30 there, 2) the total audience numbered
    > less than 30 people and
    > 3) the only people I recognized as cyclists there were
    > guys that worked at CPBikes (excepting the crazy husband-and-
    > wife duo constantly chiming in to champion folding
    > bikes).
    >
    > Joe was there to discuss why bicycle commuting is the way
    > to go, and, eventually, albeit less passionately, why his
    > bikes are the bikes to do it on. As everyone knows, Joe
    > is committed to the idea of a fit and efficient USA
    > brought about by mass bike commuting and he got genuinely
    > choked up at times - especially as he related biking to
    > national pride.
    >
    > I was impressed at Joe's genuine, emotional commitment to
    > his idea (which, obviously, we all agree with here) and
    > his presentation - the new company and the new bikes were
    > almost afterthoughts in his speech...he really was there
    > to pimp commuting, not subject us to an infomercial. Also,
    > the MD Secretary of Transportation was there, actively
    > participating, taking notes, and interacting with the
    > crowd, so that was good.
    >
    > It's not every day you get to abuse the College Park City
    > Hall meeting room trying to get electronics set up with
    > the inventor of mountain bikes. Word.
    >
    > Chris -Okay, fine, lots of guys were slamming down Repack,
    > but Breeze put the fatties on first and, most importantly,
    > built the first frame just for offroad riding. So there.
    >
    >

    That is really cool. I had a similar encounter a couple of
    weeks ago when I was checking out this very new Scott DH
    bike infront of SW Sound. The owner of the ride comes out,
    we start BSing, and I realize it is Greg Herbold (sp?).
    Perhaps not in the same category as Mr. Breeze, but fun
    none-the-less.

    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove ".nospam" to reply)
     
  7. Jd

    Jd Guest

    "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<u9idnaLSceeEl9DdRVn-
    [email protected]>... <snip namedropper jive>

    Those bikes are very expensive and not made really well
    either. If you want a commuter, get a good 'ol electrostatic-
    welded Schwinn steel three or five speed on eBay for cheap.

    JD
     
  8. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On 10 Mar 2004 14:10:04 -0800, JD wrote:
    > "Chris" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<u9idnaLSceeEl9DdRVn-
    > [email protected]>... <snip namedropper jive>
    >
    > Those bikes are very expensive and not made really
    > well either. If you want a commuter, get a good 'ol
    > electrostatic-welded Schwinn steel three or five speed
    > on eBay for cheap.

    Other better choices for a commuter: an old MTB with riser
    bars, street-worthy tires, and perhaps a squishier seat;
    various one-speed cruisers (if its a short commute); Townies
    from Electra.

    Joe Breeze can have all the enthusiasm he wants, but its not
    new bikes that Americans need, its a new attitude and better
    city planning. Want people to ride bikes in town? Start by
    making it so riders don't feel like they're flirting death.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail
    address, at least)
     
  9. On 2004-03-10, BB penned:
    >
    > Joe Breeze can have all the enthusiasm he wants, but its
    > not new bikes that Americans need, its a new attitude and
    > better city planning. Want people to ride bikes in town?
    > Start by making it so riders don't feel like they're
    > flirting death.

    Out of curiosity, what sorts of planning do you think would
    help this problem?

    A truckload of people bike around here. There do seem to be
    bike lanes, and the sheer number of cyclists forces drivers
    to pay more attention than they would in, say, the metro DC
    area. But it still seems pretty risky to me.

    --
    monique
     
  10. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 15:55:27 -0700, Monique Y. Herman wrote:

    > Out of curiosity, what sorts of planning do you think
    > would help this problem?

    Bike lanes are good for a start, but there are places in
    Germany when you can commute from quite a way off and
    never set tire on a street with cars (lots of separate
    bike paths).

    Building suburbs that aren't way the hell out of town, and
    zoning commercial so its not way the hell from the burbs
    also helps.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail
    address, at least)
     
  11. Monique Y. Herman wrote:
    > On 2004-03-10, BB penned:
    >
    >>Joe Breeze can have all the enthusiasm he wants, but its
    >>not new bikes that Americans need, its a new attitude and
    >>better city planning. Want people to ride bikes in town?
    >>Start by making it so riders don't feel like they're
    >>flirting death.
    >
    >
    > Out of curiosity, what sorts of planning do you think
    > would help this problem?
    >
    > A truckload of people bike around here. There do seem to
    > be bike lanes, and the sheer number of cyclists forces
    > drivers to pay more attention than they would in, say, the
    > metro DC area. But it still seems pretty risky to me.
    >

    People plan on not being fat a lazy. Look at the stats
    about obesity, good old Colorado is always the lowest in
    the US. There are bike lanes on the front range because
    folks want them, there are beltways in DC because that is
    what they want.

    In all seriousness, it is a great question, do you build it
    and they will come, or do you need the support for bike
    lanes before you build them? Same with close in trails, easy
    acess to them and all that. Colorado simply has a more
    athletic, outdoor attitude than any area I have seen on the
    east cost, though I have not seen them all. That is one of
    the reasons I live here instead of Binghamton NY or Reading
    PA, two very poor examples for comparison sake.

    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove ".nospam" to reply)
     
  12. Axis

    Axis Guest

    "BB" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 15:55:27 -0700, Monique Y. Herman
    > wrote: Bike lanes are good for a start, but there are
    > places in Germany when you can commute from quite a way
    > off and never set tire on a street with cars (lots of
    > separate bike paths).

    I spent a few weeks cycling in Sweden, Denmark and the
    Netherlands. It was really cool that I could ride a bike
    everywhere! In fact in Copenhagen I took advantage of the
    "city" bikes available for free. For about a buck you could
    unlock a city bike (pretty crappy but it worked) and ride
    anywhere in the city. If you went to another city bike rack
    you would get your money back! I used mine to go to
    Christiania and buy hash. Smoked and watched the kids on
    freeride bikes hit ramps and do tricks. It was cool resting
    against a ancient rune stone toking away with a free bike to
    ride, watching kids on some killer freeride bikes (bullits,
    jokers, dare's) jump doubles and.... the American tourists
    tripping out at the very permissive and open way of life
    there. I loved that, it gave me the same feeling when I was
    young and riding freestyle in Boston going to see The Pixies
    down in the combat zone.
     
  13. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:46:07 +0000, BB wrote:

    >> Those bikes are very expensive and not made really
    >> well either. If you want a commuter, get a good 'ol
    >> electrostatic-welded Schwinn steel three or five speed
    >> on eBay for cheap.
    >
    > Other better choices for a commuter: an old MTB with riser
    > bars, street-worthy tires, and perhaps a squishier seat;
    > various one-speed cruisers (if its a short commute);
    > Townies from Electra.

    I built my commuter out of old bikes that had been thrown
    out, Womble style. It works pretty well, but no-one's going
    to want to nick it either.

    > Joe Breeze can have all the enthusiasm he wants, but its
    > not new bikes that Americans need, its a new attitude and
    > better city planning. Want people to ride bikes in town?
    > Start by making it so riders don't feel like they're
    > flirting death.

    Agreed, but somebody has to start the ball rolling.

    Just as an aside, I rode in to work this morning. Bike
    paths almost the whole way - very pleasant on a cold,
    frosty morning.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.j-harris.net/bike/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  14. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 16:13:11 -0700, Craig Brossman wrote:

    > In all seriousness, it is a great question, do you build
    > it and they will come, or do you need the support for bike
    > lanes before you build them? Same with close in trails,
    > easy acess to them and all that.

    These things cost money - the support has to come first.
    Portland (Oregon) has relatively good support for these
    things, and typically ranks near the top (if not at the
    top) of Bike Magazine's (or some such rag) list of bike-
    friendly cities.

    But just this evening I was riding up to the trailhead; part
    of the ride is along a paved ridgeline road that is popular
    with roadies. As I was climbing the last bit of hill, two
    roadies came zipping down the opposite direction. A woman in
    a BMW passed between us, shaking her head in dismay. THIS is
    bike-friendly in the USA.

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail
    address, at least)
     
  15. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    bomba <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Wed, 10 Mar 2004 22:46:07 +0000, BB wrote:
    >
    > >> Those bikes are very expensive and not made really well
    > >> either. If you want a commuter, get a good 'ol electrostatic-
    > >> welded Schwinn steel three or five speed on eBay for
    > >> cheap.
    > >
    > > Other better choices for a commuter: an old MTB with
    > > riser bars, street-worthy tires, and perhaps a squishier
    > > seat; various one-speed cruisers (if its a short
    > > commute); Townies from Electra.
    >
    > I built my commuter out of old bikes that had been thrown
    > out, Womble style. It works pretty well, but no-one's
    > going to want to nick it either.

    I put together a commuter out of an old Giant Rincon frame.
    All the parts were either too worn out for dirt duty (like
    chainrings, partial cassettes, tires, or wheels with some
    serious boogie), or garbage picked (like the giant cushy
    spring saddle sofa with the foam sticking out). The bike's
    highlight was that nothing matched. The cranks were
    different, the pedals, shifters (Suntour and Gripshift),
    everything. It had a big basket on the back for groceries,
    and was humble as a homemade shoe. Some peckerhead ripped it
    off. I was almost equally annoyed and amused. /s
     
  16. Craig Brossman <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    > Colorado simply has a more athletic, outdoor attitude than
    > any area I have seen on the east cost, though I have not
    > seen them all. That is one of the reasons I live here
    > instead of Binghamton NY or Reading PA, two very poor
    > examples for comparison sake.

    Tell me about it. Buffalo is scary that way. And you're
    right about Colorado. Colorado has the best looking women in
    the country, IMO, and I think that culture of athleticism .
    (I was tempted to say "of anyplace I've ever been", but then
    I thought of Munich. Sigh.)

    You are very fortunate to live in Durango.

    CC
     
  17. Corvus Corvax wrote:

    > You are very fortunate to live in Durango.
    >
    > CC

    Don't ever stop reminding me of that, sometimes, in my own
    stupidity, I forget.

    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove ".nospam" to reply)
     
  18. Bb

    Bb Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 09:00:42 +0100, bomba wrote:

    > Just as an aside, I rode in to work this morning. Bike
    > paths almost the whole way - very pleasant on a cold,
    > frosty morning.

    There are a few people I know of in Germany (and I'm sure
    thousands I don't know of) who can bike to work by taking
    paths almost the whole way. Makes me very jealous.

    Bike paths are fantastic - there's one from my neighborhood
    to a big grocery store a couple miles away. Its so much
    nicer not having to ride with cars. I realize land in town
    is very expensive, but people don't realize what it provides
    them - that small stretch of path is almost always in use
    (bikers, runners, walkers).

    --
    -BB- To reply to me, drop the attitude (from my e-mail
    address, at least)
     
  19. Dave W

    Dave W Guest

    BB <[email protected]> had this to say
    news:[email protected]

    > On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 09:00:42 +0100, bomba wrote:
    >
    >> Just as an aside, I rode in to work this morning. Bike
    >> paths almost the whole way - very pleasant on a cold,
    >> frosty morning.
    >
    > There are a few people I know of in Germany (and I'm sure
    > thousands I don't know of) who can bike to work by taking
    > paths almost the whole way. Makes me very jealous.
    >
    > Bike paths are fantastic - there's one from my
    > neighborhood to a big grocery store a couple miles away.
    > Its so much nicer not having to ride with cars. I realize
    > land in town is very expensive, but people don't realize
    > what it provides them - that small stretch of path is
    > almost always in use (bikers, runners, walkers).
    >

    ya'll would really dig Peachtree City then. 40+ miles of
    cart/bike paths. there is no business that can't be accessed
    via the paths. And the city takes a "no big box" type stores
    allowed. Well, not exactly "not allowed" but they put some
    many restrictions on them that they just don't bother trying
    to develop there. Wal-Mart & Home Depot are the only two,
    and that was after many years of trying ot get the proper
    zoning. And they even had to share the same lot, one that
    was much smaller than any they've gotten in the past.
    They've only been here for a year now as is. (And it is
    accessible via the path's :)
     
  20. Shawn Curry

    Shawn Curry Guest

    Dave W wrote:
    > BB <[email protected]> had this to say news:[email protected]
    > berlin.de
    >
    >
    >>On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 09:00:42 +0100, bomba wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Just as an aside, I rode in to work this morning. Bike
    >>>paths almost the whole way - very pleasant on a cold,
    >>>frosty morning.
    >>
    >>There are a few people I know of in Germany (and I'm sure
    >>thousands I don't know of) who can bike to work by taking
    >>paths almost the whole way. Makes me very jealous.
    >>
    >>Bike paths are fantastic - there's one from my
    >>neighborhood to a big grocery store a couple miles away.
    >>Its so much nicer not having to ride with cars. I realize
    >>land in town is very expensive, but people don't realize
    >>what it provides them - that small stretch of path is
    >>almost always in use (bikers, runners, walkers).
    >>
    >
    >
    > ya'll would really dig Peachtree City then. 40+ miles of
    > cart/bike paths. there is no business that can't be
    > accessed via the paths. And the city takes a "no big box"
    > type stores allowed. Well, not exactly "not allowed" but
    > they put some many restrictions on them that they just
    > don't bother trying to develop there. Wal-Mart & Home
    > Depot are the only two, and that was after many years of
    > trying ot get the proper zoning. And they even had to
    > share the same lot, one that was much smaller than any
    > they've gotten in the past. They've only been here for a
    > year now as is. (And it is accessible via the path's :)
    >
    Here in Salida, the bike path goes right behind Walmart, but
    doesn't connect to the parking lot. Last I looked, there was
    a fence preventing access. Might have to work on that.

    Shawn
     
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