Me and my rear wheels

Discussion in 'Mountain Bikes' started by Squid-In-Traini, May 9, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented and
    out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this). Now, I'm
    probably somewhat of a shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a little at a
    time, etc. I'm beginning to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.

    The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    keep replacing these rims. Kinda sucks because I sold my XT disc hubs (which were heavier than the
    bike itself) just recently after I got the XTC.

    Has anyone else had this dilemma?

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
    Tags:


  2. Bomba

    Bomba Guest

    Phil, Squid-in-Training wrote:
    > So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented
    > and out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this). Now,
    > I'm probably somewhat of a shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a little at
    > a time, etc. I'm beginning to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.
    >
    > The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    > keep replacing these rims. Kinda sucks because I sold my XT disc hubs (which were heavier than the
    > bike itself) just recently after I got the XTC.
    >
    > Has anyone else had this dilemma?

    No. Even with discs you should be keeping your wheels true.

    You're building the wheels yourself, right? Perhaps you're doing something wrong. Wheels shouldn't
    go out of true that badly on such a regular basis, and unless you properly prang it, you shouldn't
    have to throw out a rim because it's out of true for a long time.

    --
    a.m-b FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/ambfaq.htm

    b.bmx FAQ: http://www.t-online.de/~jharris/bmx_faq.htm
     
  3. "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented
    > and out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this). Now,
    > I'm probably somewhat of
    a
    > shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a little at a time, etc. I'm beginning
    > to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.
    >
    > The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    > keep replacing these rims. Kinda sucks because I sold my XT disc hubs (which were heavier than the
    > bike itself) just
    recently
    > after I got the XTC.
    >
    > Has anyone else had this dilemma?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training
    >
    >

    Phil, either take a leaf out of BMX and run no brakes, or run discs.

    BTW your wheels really shouldn't be coming out of true so fast - are you sure you are putting enough
    tension on them enough
     
  4. Dick

    Dick Guest

    > So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented
    > and out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this).

    If you're denting the rims it is more likely to be a problem with your riding style. Try sacrificing
    a bit of traction and adding 5-10psi to your tires. If you're a newbie you should probably be
    running close to the maximum rating on your tires.

    > Now, I'm probably somewhat of a shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a
    > little at a time, etc. I'm beginning to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.

    Maybe you should drop by a friendly shop and see if they'll evaluate your repairs. Ask them nicly
    and then listen quietly.

    > The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    > keep replacing these rims.

    If your just can't seem to resolve the problem maybe try some more robust rims before plunking down
    for discs. discs are nice because you don't have to be as attentive trueness but that doesn't mean
    you can totally neglect them. It's better to solve the problem than hack around it.
     
  5. Tom Walker

    Tom Walker Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented
    > and out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this). Now,
    > I'm probably somewhat of a shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a little at
    > a time, etc. I'm beginning to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.
    >
    > The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    > keep replacing these rims. Kinda sucks because I sold my XT disc hubs (which were heavier than the
    > bike itself) just recently after I got the XTC.
    >
    > Has anyone else had this dilemma?

    Are you stress relieving the spokes properly when you true up the wheel again? Does it sound like
    someone's shooting BBs at sheet metal when you first get on the bike? What's the lacing pattern? If
    you're not stress relieving the spokes after you true the wheel it could go out of true quickly. If
    you're running straight lace on the drive side this could be a problem too.

    [email protected]
     
  6. Tj

    Tj Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented
    > and out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this). Now,
    > I'm probably somewhat of
    a
    > shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a little at a time, etc. I'm beginning
    > to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.
    >
    > The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    > keep replacing these rims. Kinda sucks because I sold my XT disc hubs (which were heavier than the
    > bike itself) just
    recently
    > after I got the XTC.
    >
    > Has anyone else had this dilemma?
    >
    > --
    > Phil, Squid-in-Training
    >
    >
    Prestress the spokes. Remember that you need to loosen some spokes when adjusting tension. first
    take out any bounce, then take out wobble. Then take out the bounce again. Then take out the wobble
    again. Repeat until you are satisfied ( Builders Pride Here) IF there is no bounce, most likely you
    have a very evenly stressed wheel. Then tension it up a notch. It is nice if you have a self
    centering truing stand like a Park, or VAR. Sheldon browns page has some good wheel building info.
    So does DT Swiss.

    TJ
     
  7. Adam

    Adam Guest

    "Phil, Squid-in-Training" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > So I'm never able to keep my rear wheels in true. I've got an XTC SE2 and they're always dented
    > and out of true by far (yes I do mild jumping but nothing that would cause stuff like this). Now,
    > I'm probably somewhat of a shitty wheelbuilder, but I do my best to get equal tension, a little at
    > a time, etc. I'm beginning to think that replacing rims won't be much fun anymore.
    >
    > The question is if it's more effective to go with discs (and let it be out of true) or if I should
    > keep replacing these rims. Kinda sucks because I sold my XT disc hubs (which were heavier than the
    > bike itself) just recently after I got the XTC.
    >
    > Has anyone else had this dilemma?

    Hi Phil,

    It sounds like they're going out of true very quickly, and reasonably well-built wheels shouldn't do
    that. If you're building your own, make sure they're well tensioned and make sure you stress-relieve
    them properly before riding. I use the 'squeeze parallel spokes on the same sides' method, which
    seems to work well. If the wheel goes markedly out-of-true after stress relieving, it may be that
    the spoke tension is too high. You should stress relieve after truing and then true again if needed.
    Repeat until the wheels hold.

    Your wheels should still be kept to the same standards with disc brakes, I would have thought; it's
    just that bent rims don't necessarily mean the ride is over. The rims should be able to take a fair
    bit of lateral abuse before they need replacing - I've seen wheels with several centimetres of
    lateral movement returned to perfect true.

    Adam...
     
  8. > Hi Phil,
    >
    > It sounds like they're going out of true very quickly, and reasonably well-built wheels shouldn't
    > do that. If you're building your own, make sure they're well tensioned and make sure you
    > stress-relieve them properly before riding. I use the 'squeeze parallel spokes on the same sides'
    > method, which seems to work well. If the wheel goes markedly out-of-true after stress relieving,
    > it may be that the spoke tension is too high. You should stress relieve after truing and then true
    > again if needed. Repeat until the wheels hold.
    >
    > Your wheels should still be kept to the same standards with disc brakes, I would have thought;
    > it's just that bent rims don't necessarily mean the ride is over. The rims should be able to take
    > a fair bit of lateral abuse before they need replacing - I've seen wheels with several centimetres
    > of lateral movement returned to perfect true.

    The case in hand is my current rear. During a race in Tallahassee, FL, my rear went way out for
    about 1/8 of the circumference. When I got back home and trued it up, it had MAD tension on one side
    and zero (spin the nipple by hand) tension on the other. I detensioned the whole damn thing and went
    by SBrown's website, making sure the spokes were generally screwed in the same amount of nipple on
    each spoke before feeling tension. Then I went around, pulling it in (mostly a whole lot in two
    humps). A problem I have is that I can't ever get enough tension to pull the rim at a bounce as TJ
    said. I generally try a little bit then just go for lateral trueness. Then I pinch the spokes.

    On my road bike I don't bother stress relieving, and they make the clickety stress relieving sound,
    but they stay relatively true. On that bike, the front is a 36hole... I wonder if it makes that big
    a difference.

    Whoever said my technique sucks is right. But while I'm working on that, I'd like to have a wheel
    that doesn't rub!

    Yes, I up my PSI to 60 or so when I'm urban assaulting. Yes, I put enough tension on them. Close to
    stripping the nipples on the ones that are pulling the outta true spokes back in. And I've lubed the
    inside and outside of each nippple before

    I lust after the days when I had discs and didn't give truing a second thought...

    32h 3x no-name black spokes on the OEM wheel of an XTC SE2. Mavic X221, Shimano Deore hub.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...