Meatloaf en croute?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Andy Katz, Dec 7, 2005.

  1. Andy Katz

    Andy Katz Guest

    I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.

    Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    control on the menu).

    Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    appearing in comfort food venues?

    Andy Katz
     
    Tags:


  2. PastaLover

    PastaLover Guest

    Andy Katz wrote:
    > I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    > cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    > a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    > pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >
    > Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    > learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    > trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    > meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    > (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    > control on the menu).
    >
    > Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    > appearing in comfort food venues?
    >
    > Andy Katz


    I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.
     
  3. Andy Katz

    Andy Katz Guest

    On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    >this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    >a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.


    No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.

    Andy Katz
     
  4. On Wed 07 Dec 2005 08:00:09p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Andy Katz?

    > I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    > cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    > a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    > pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >
    > Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    > learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    > trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any


    You "trailed at 24"? What the hell is that, Andy? It probably fits in the
    thread about most-hated phrases. :)

    > meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    > (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    > control on the menu).
    >
    > Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    > appearing in comfort food venues?


    I wouldn't say it's common, but certainly doable. I've seen it before, but
    never eaten it. Unlike Beef Wellington, however, the meatloaf would need
    to be cooked before encasing in the pastry. If you didn't, it would
    probably end up a greasy mess.

    More common, of course, is a cooked, hot meatloaf frosted and decorated
    with well-seasoned mashed potatoes, then browned nicely in the oven.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  5. On Wed 07 Dec 2005 08:08:59p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it PastaLover?

    > Andy Katz wrote:
    >> I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    >> cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    >> a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    >> pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >>
    >> Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    >> learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    >> trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    >> meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    >> (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    >> control on the menu).
    >>
    >> Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    >> appearing in comfort food venues?
    >>
    >> Andy Katz

    >
    > I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    > pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    > this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    > a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.


    Meatloaf en croute is certainly none of the above. Each of them is unto
    themselves. I think Andy is picturing a meatloaf made with at least a
    pound or two of meat, not anything hand-held.

    Having said that, I absolutely love Cornish pasties. Empanadas are pretty
    good, too.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  6. Steve Pope

    Steve Pope Guest

    Andy Katz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    >cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    >a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    >pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >
    >Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    >learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    >trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    >meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    >(they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    >control on the menu).
    >
    >Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    >appearing in comfort food venues?


    Try googling "meatloaf en croute". There's only 19 hits
    but it appears a recipe by that name appeared many years
    ago, and that it's on the menu of a comfort food restaurant
    in Los Angeles.

    Your blue cheese may be an original touch though...

    Steve
    >
    >Andy Katz
     
  7. aem

    aem Guest

    Andy Katz wrote:
    > [snip] Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    > appearing in comfort food venues?
    >

    No. If it appeared anywhere it would be rare. Probably because it's a
    bad idea. A good meatloaf is made of two or three different ground
    meats, preferably fatty ones. A good one produces *a lot* of fat while
    it's cooking. How can you possibly wrap such a thing in pastry, and
    why in the world would you want to? If you want something crusty with
    your meatloaf, wait till the second day and toast the bread for your
    meatloaf sandwich. -aem
     
  8. PastaLover

    PastaLover Guest

    Andy Katz wrote:
    > On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    >>this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    >>a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.

    >
    >
    > No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >
    > Andy Katz


    Which is a ground meat dish.... right?
     
  9. PastaLover

    PastaLover Guest

    Andy Katz wrote:
    > On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    >>this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    >>a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.

    >
    >
    > No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >
    > Andy Katz


    After reading another couple posts, maybe I'm misunderstanding exactly
    what it is you're wanting....
     
  10. On Wed 07 Dec 2005 09:28:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it PastaLover?

    > Andy Katz wrote:
    >> On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    >>>this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    >>>a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.

    >>
    >>
    >> No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >>
    >> Andy Katz

    >
    > After reading another couple posts, maybe I'm misunderstanding exactly
    > what it is you're wanting....
    >


    This is typical meatloaf, the sort that Andy is referring to. Meatloaves
    are generally made with ground meats (beef, pork, veal).

    http://natural-beef.com/images/main-meatloaf.jpg

    Picture that wrapped entirely in pastry or puff paste and baked until the
    pastry is done. (I couldn't find a picture of that.)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  11. PastaLover

    PastaLover Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 07 Dec 2005 09:28:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it PastaLover?
    >
    >
    >>Andy Katz wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    >>>wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>>>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something like
    >>>>this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry encasing
    >>>>a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >>>
    >>>Andy Katz

    >>
    >>After reading another couple posts, maybe I'm misunderstanding exactly
    >>what it is you're wanting....
    >>

    >
    >
    > This is typical meatloaf, the sort that Andy is referring to. Meatloaves
    > are generally made with ground meats (beef, pork, veal).
    >
    > http://natural-beef.com/images/main-meatloaf.jpg
    >
    > Picture that wrapped entirely in pastry or puff paste and baked until the
    > pastry is done. (I couldn't find a picture of that.)
    >


    Okay. So is the meatloaf cooked before the pastry or at the same time?
    If at the same time, it's what I originally described.
     
  12. On Wed 07 Dec 2005 10:59:09p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    PastaLover?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Wed 07 Dec 2005 09:28:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    >> PastaLover?
    >>
    >>
    >>>Andy Katz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>>>>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something
    >>>>>like this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry
    >>>>>encasing a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >>>>
    >>>>Andy Katz
    >>>
    >>>After reading another couple posts, maybe I'm misunderstanding exactly
    >>>what it is you're wanting....
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> This is typical meatloaf, the sort that Andy is referring to.
    >> Meatloaves are generally made with ground meats (beef, pork, veal).
    >>
    >> http://natural-beef.com/images/main-meatloaf.jpg
    >>
    >> Picture that wrapped entirely in pastry or puff paste and baked until
    >> the pastry is done. (I couldn't find a picture of that.)
    >>

    >
    > Okay. So is the meatloaf cooked before the pastry or at the same time?
    > If at the same time, it's what I originally described.
    >


    The meatloaf is baked first, then wrapped in pastry and baked again. If
    the meatloaf mixture was wrapped in pastry while still raw and then baked,
    no doubt the pastry would be burnt and very greasy by the time the meat
    inside was cooked. It's the mass of meat that makes the difference. Even
    with Beef Wellington (boeuf en croute) made with tenderloin of beef, the
    meat is roasted first, then wrapped in pastry and baked again.

    What you originally described were various hand-sized meat "pies", not
    meatloaves.

    I'm not trying to be snotty, but may I ask where you live that you have
    never seen or heard of a meatloaf?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  13. On Wed 07 Dec 2005 10:59:09p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    PastaLover?

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> On Wed 07 Dec 2005 09:28:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    >> PastaLover?
    >>
    >>
    >>>Andy Katz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    >>>>wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>>>>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something
    >>>>>like this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry
    >>>>>encasing a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >>>>
    >>>>Andy Katz
    >>>
    >>>After reading another couple posts, maybe I'm misunderstanding exactly
    >>>what it is you're wanting....
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> This is typical meatloaf, the sort that Andy is referring to.
    >> Meatloaves are generally made with ground meats (beef, pork, veal).
    >>
    >> http://natural-beef.com/images/main-meatloaf.jpg
    >>
    >> Picture that wrapped entirely in pastry or puff paste and baked until
    >> the pastry is done. (I couldn't find a picture of that.)
    >>

    >
    > Okay. So is the meatloaf cooked before the pastry or at the same time?
    > If at the same time, it's what I originally described.
    >


    The meatloaf is baked first, then wrapped in pastry and baked again. If
    the meatloaf mixture was wrapped in pastry while still raw and then baked,
    no doubt the pastry would be burnt and very greasy by the time the meat
    inside was cooked. It's the mass of meat that makes the difference. Even
    with Beef Wellington (boeuf en croute) made with tenderloin of beef, the
    meat is roasted first, then wrapped in pastry and baked again.

    What you originally described were various hand-sized meat "pies", not
    meatloaves.

    I'm not trying to be snotty, but may I ask where you live that you have
    never seen or heard of a meatloaf?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright *¿*
    _____________________________________________

    A chicken in every pot is a *LOT* of chicken!
     
  14. biig

    biig Guest

    Andy Katz wrote:
    >
    > I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    > cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    > a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    > pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >
    > Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    > learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    > trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    > meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    > (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    > control on the menu).
    >
    > Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    > appearing in comfort food venues?
    >
    > Andy Katz


    Would the grease that comes out of the meat loaf be a problem or
    could you just cover the top and sides with the dough??? Sharon
     
  15. Andy Katz <[email protected]> looking for trouble wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    > cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    > a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    > pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >
    > Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    > learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    > trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    > meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    > (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    > control on the menu).
    >
    > Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    > appearing in comfort food venues?
    >
    > Andy Katz


    I did a quick Google search to satisfy my own curiosity on this. I am a big
    meat loaf fan even though my meat loaf leaves <cough> much to be desired.
    Anything resembling what you describe is called a pate' on the sites I
    Googled. I may have put in the wrong search criteria. I have yet to see it
    on a menu here in St. Louis.

    It sounds interesting and quite good to me. I'm wondering if one would
    leave out the tomato sauce as the puff pastry would tend to get too soggy?

    Michael

    --
    ....Bacteria: The rear entrance to a cafeteria.

    All gramatical errors and misspellings due to Ramsey the cyber kitten. He
    now owns all keyboards and computing devices in the household and has the
    final say on what is, or is not, posted.
    Send email to dog30 at charter dot net
     
  16. Andy Katz

    Andy Katz Guest

    On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 22:59:09 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Okay. So is the meatloaf cooked before the pastry or at the same time?
    >If at the same time, it's what I originally described.


    Oh, I would cook off the meatloaf prior, then do as much of the wrap
    as possible a la minute so it avoids getting soggy but doesn't have to
    be excessively dry.

    Andy Katz
    ***************************************************************
    Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
    while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
    that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
    the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

    Paghat, the Rat Girl
     
  17. PastaLover

    PastaLover Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Wed 07 Dec 2005 10:59:09p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    > PastaLover?
    >
    >
    >>Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Wed 07 Dec 2005 09:28:39p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it
    >>>PastaLover?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Andy Katz wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>>On Wed, 07 Dec 2005 20:08:59 -0700, PastaLover <[email protected]>
    >>>>>wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>I think it's called a Jamacian meat pattie, or an empanada, or a meat
    >>>>>>pie, or a Cornish pasty... Just about every culture has something
    >>>>>>like this, baked or fried, hand-held size or larger, dough or pastry
    >>>>>>encasing a mix of ground meat, seasoning, and sometimes veggies.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>No. I'm talking specifically about meatloaf.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Andy Katz
    >>>>
    >>>>After reading another couple posts, maybe I'm misunderstanding exactly
    >>>>what it is you're wanting....
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>This is typical meatloaf, the sort that Andy is referring to.
    >>>Meatloaves are generally made with ground meats (beef, pork, veal).
    >>>
    >>> http://natural-beef.com/images/main-meatloaf.jpg
    >>>
    >>>Picture that wrapped entirely in pastry or puff paste and baked until
    >>>the pastry is done. (I couldn't find a picture of that.)
    >>>

    >>
    >>Okay. So is the meatloaf cooked before the pastry or at the same time?
    >>If at the same time, it's what I originally described.
    >>

    >
    >
    > The meatloaf is baked first, then wrapped in pastry and baked again. If
    > the meatloaf mixture was wrapped in pastry while still raw and then baked,
    > no doubt the pastry would be burnt and very greasy by the time the meat
    > inside was cooked. It's the mass of meat that makes the difference. Even
    > with Beef Wellington (boeuf en croute) made with tenderloin of beef, the
    > meat is roasted first, then wrapped in pastry and baked again.
    >
    > What you originally described were various hand-sized meat "pies", not
    > meatloaves.
    >
    > I'm not trying to be snotty, but may I ask where you live that you have
    > never seen or heard of a meatloaf?
    >


    I've heard of a meatloaf. Grandma used to make a lot of it. ;-)

    I just didn't realize what exactly it was that you were talking about. I
    was recently in so. Florida and every time I turned around, I was seeing
    these Jacmaican meat patty things, so that was naturally what I thought
    of when I saw something about ground meat in pastry.
     
  18. Andy Katz

    Andy Katz Guest

    On 8 Dec 2005 04:50:15 +0100, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed 07 Dec 2005 08:00:09p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Andy Katz?
    >
    >> I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    >> cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    >> a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    >> pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >>
    >> Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    >> learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    >> trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any

    >
    >You "trailed at 24"? What the hell is that, Andy? It probably fits in the
    >thread about most-hated phrases. :)


    Sorry. "Trailed" means to work a shift without pay, either to see if
    you'd like to work there, or just want the experience. I *was* looking
    for a job, and I liked the place, but the station I'd work was too far
    away from the pass, and I can't hear that well, so I'd have a hard
    time keeping up with service.

    Looks as though ChipShop in Brooklyn is beckoning. I'm trailing there
    tonight, but I'd have to be especially inept not to get the job;-)

    >> meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    >> (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    >> control on the menu).
    >>
    >> Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    >> appearing in comfort food venues?

    >
    >I wouldn't say it's common, but certainly doable. I've seen it before, but
    >never eaten it. Unlike Beef Wellington, however, the meatloaf would need
    >to be cooked before encasing in the pastry. If you didn't, it would
    >probably end up a greasy mess.


    Oh, yes. I'm thinking a solid, finished meatloaf, then some onions, or
    other vegetables and a cheese to add moisture but avoid sogginess.

    >More common, of course, is a cooked, hot meatloaf frosted and decorated
    >with well-seasoned mashed potatoes, then browned nicely in the oven.


    Hmmmm;-)

    Thanks

    Andy Katz
    ***************************************************************
    Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
    while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
    that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
    the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

    Paghat, the Rat Girl
     
  19. Andy Katz

    Andy Katz Guest

    On 7 Dec 2005 20:12:34 -0800, "aem" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Andy Katz wrote:
    >> [snip] Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    >> appearing in comfort food venues?
    >>

    >No. If it appeared anywhere it would be rare. Probably because it's a
    >bad idea. A good meatloaf is made of two or three different ground
    >meats, preferably fatty ones. A good one produces *a lot* of fat while
    >it's cooking. How can you possibly wrap such a thing in pastry, and
    >why in the world would you want to? If you want something crusty with
    >your meatloaf, wait till the second day and toast the bread for your
    >meatloaf sandwich. -aem


    I've made meatloaf with pretty much every combination of meat,
    including ground turkey. Sometimes I'd grind the meats myself,
    sometimes I bought them ground (sorry Shelly;-).

    Some of the results were good. But the best meatloaf I ever had was
    made of veal, pre-ground. Go figure.

    Naturally you're right about the meat not being especially lean, but I
    would cook the meatloafs off well before service, wrap them, maybe par
    cook them and finish them off a la minute. That ought to reduce the
    greasy factor.

    Of course, you might be right. It *might* be a bad idea. But many
    commercial comfort foods here in NYC combine high and low end
    concepts: eg, mac & cheese made with fine imported cheddars. Beef
    Wellington is a kind of middle-brow comfort food, the idea of which
    might mesh well with low-brow meatloaf.

    Or not .....


    Andy Katz
    ***************************************************************
    Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
    while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
    that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
    the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

    Paghat, the Rat Girl
     
  20. Andy Katz

    Andy Katz Guest

    On Thu, 08 Dec 2005 08:29:36 -0500, biig <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Andy Katz wrote:
    >>
    >> I was thinking about ways to serve meatloaf that would avoid
    >> cliche but still validate this American classic. I wasn't thinking of
    >> a true Wellington per se, but rather encasing the meatloaf in puff
    >> pastry with caramelized onions and maybe some blue cheese.
    >>
    >> Then I read the NY Times food section ($25 & Under), only to
    >> learn that 24 Prince is doing exactly that. Or was. I *think* I
    >> trailed at 24 a couple weeks ago, and they weren't doing any
    >> meatloafs, or other species of comfort foods the review alluded to
    >> (they don't have a chef right now, so there might not be the degree of
    >> control on the menu).
    >>
    >> Either way, is meatloaf en croute common, has it been
    >> appearing in comfort food venues?
    >>
    >> Andy Katz

    >
    > Would the grease that comes out of the meat loaf be a problem or
    >could you just cover the top and sides with the dough??? Sharon


    Shouldn't be, because all you're doing is re-heating the already
    cooked meat, cooking the pastry and melting the cheese or whatever
    filling you chose.

    Andy Katz
    ***************************************************************
    Being lied to so billionaires can wage war for profits
    while indebting taxpayers for generations to come, now
    that's just a tad bit bigger than not admitting you like
    the big moist-moist lips of chunky trollops on your pecker.

    Paghat, the Rat Girl
     
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