[media] TheAge (AU) Police warning for iPod users

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Alan J. Wylie, Feb 15, 2006.

  1. As seen on digg.com

    Makes no suggestion that the use of an iPod was of any significance in
    Ms McMillan's death. Note the quotes attributed to her "friends".

    I personally agree with the warning, and would *never* use my iPod
    whilst cycling.

    <cite>
    Police warning for iPod users

    * iPod blamed for Aussie's death

    Police have warned that cyclists should never listen to an iPod while
    riding unless they have a death wish.

    "If you're a cyclist and you want to stay alive, I wouldn't wear an
    iPod under any circumstances," Assistant Commissioner (Traffic) Noel
    Ashby told theage.com.au this afternoon.

    Assistant Commissioner Ashby said police were seeing increasing
    numbers of people using iPods on bikes, while walking and even while
    driving a car.

    "They're becoming increasingly popular and there's no issue with that
    but the point remains you cannot hear what is around you," he said.

    "People that have been brought up their whole life relying on a whole
    range of human senses and if one's removed they are at a significant
    disadvantage."

    The alert comes after a 32 year-old Australian woman was knocked off
    her bicycle and killed in London. Friends said she may have been
    killed as she couldn't hear traffic noise over her iPod.

    A friend of Ms McMillan's told London's Evening Standard she may still
    be alive if she hadn't been listening to her iPod.

    "She was obsessed by that thing," he said.

    ....

    </cite>

    --
    Alan J. Wylie http://www.wylie.me.uk/
    "Perfection [in design] is achieved not when there is nothing left to add,
    but rather when there is nothing left to take away."
    -- Antoine de Saint-Exupery
     
    Tags:


  2. > As seen on digg.com

    Oops - forgot the link:

    <http://www.theage.com.au/news/national/ipod--the-risks/2006/02/15/1139890771660.html>

    And on a related note:

    <http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/low/uk_news/4718502.stm>

    <cite>

    Warning on 'road sign confusion'

    Drivers are in danger of having accidents because they are being
    overloaded with journey information, the RAC Foundation has warned.

    A clutter of contradictory signs cause confusion that can lead to
    crashes, executive director Edmund King will tell a London transport
    conference.

    The popularity of in-car devices adds to this "overload", he will say.

    </cite>

    --
    Alan J. Wylie http://www.wylie.me.uk/
    "Perfection [in design] is achieved not when there is nothing left to add,
    but rather when there is nothing left to take away."
    -- Antoine de Saint-Exupery
     
  3. BigRab

    BigRab Guest


    > I personally agree with the warning, and would *never* use my iPod
    > whilst cycling.

    Whilst I personally do not agree and I do usually wear my Ipod while
    cycling (responsibly and played at a low level).

    > "If you're a cyclist and you want to stay alive, I wouldn't wear an
    > iPod under any circumstances," Assistant Commissioner (Traffic) Noel
    > Ashby told theage.com.au this afternoon.

    Yeah [sarcastic tone] I wonder how many miles *he's* clocked up on his
    bike this month.
    Just cos he says so doesn't make it right. The thing is that 'common
    sense' doesn't always equate with what happens in the real world.

    > "People that have been brought up their whole life relying on a whole
    > range of human senses and if one's removed they are at a significant
    > disadvantage."

    So enclosing people in a steel cage with superb sound proofing
    qualities is different and they, of course never listen to their
    stereos, have sat nav calling out turns and speed cameras while
    answering the hands free? That's the kind of sensory overload that
    fighter pilots have years of specific training for and only a handful
    are passed through.

    > The alert comes after a 32 year-old Australian woman was knocked off
    > her bicycle and killed in London.

    It's NOT an alert, it's a knee-jerk reaction from people who should
    know better.

    >Friends said she may have been
    > killed as she couldn't hear traffic noise over her iPod.

    Again pontificating by people who don't know.
    Have you ever been able to avoid a vehicle coming up behind you which
    was going to run into you? By the time you've thought about what that
    noise is, maybe sneaked an 'over the shoulder' you've been whacked.
    Maybe you just guess whether to jink left or right, which one is it
    gonna be? C'mon ..... too late... you're dead.

    Note that I'm NOT saying that awareness to things happening around you
    isn't important but that goes for ALL road users, especially those in
    charge of potential killing machines.

    > A friend of Ms McMillan's told London's Evening Standard she may still
    > be alive if she hadn't been listening to her iPod.

    She would maybe have been alive if she hadn'y been hit by a vehicle?

    Robert
     
  4. davek

    davek Guest

    BigRab wrote:
    >>Friends said she may have been
    >>killed as she couldn't hear traffic noise over her iPod.

    >
    > Again pontificating by people who don't know.


    And hugely misleading pontificating at that. She was killed because she
    was flattened by a truck; that much is fact. Everything else is pure
    speculation.

    No one has yet put forward any evidence to suggest that hearing the
    truck would have made any difference. Until such evidence is made
    available, I shall remain unconvinced of the iPod argument.

    > She would maybe have been alive if she hadn'y been hit by a vehicle?


    You've got a damn good point there.

    d.
     
  5. Alan J. Wylie wrote:
    > I personally agree with the warning, and would *never* use my iPod
    > whilst cycling.


    I quite like using mine (not a proper iPod - just some cheap MP3
    player). I can't work the controls while I'm riding as it's too fiddly
    to do safely and I have to make sure the headphones are just the right
    length so they don't get caught on anything or make it hard to turn my
    head.

    With regards to noise, even with mine on quite loud, the sound from the
    wind blowing over my ears and the noise of traffic both seem louder
    than the music!

    peter
     
  6. Ian Smith

    Ian Smith Guest

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 07:26:37 +0000, Alan J. Wylie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > "If you're a cyclist and you want to stay alive, I wouldn't wear an
    > iPod under any circumstances," Assistant Commissioner (Traffic) Noel
    > Ashby told theage.com.au this afternoon.


    Well he's clearly a pillock. I am a cyclist. If I choose to wear an
    iPod under the circumstances of (say) reclining at leisure in my
    living room, will I immediately be struck dead?

    I expect he's one of those that thinks I must wear a helmet at all
    times, too.

    regards, Ian SMith
    --
    |\ /| no .sig
    |o o|
    |/ \|
     
  7. On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 12:18:42 +0000, davek <[email protected]>
    said in <[email protected]>:

    >No one has yet put forward any evidence to suggest that hearing the
    >truck would have made any difference. Until such evidence is made
    >available, I shall remain unconvinced of the iPod argument.


    Having for years sworn that wearing headphones while cycling is
    dangerous, I now wear headphones (connected to an iPod) while cycling.
    The noise-cancelling Sennheiser phones I use reduces wind noise to the
    point where I can hear the music at quite moderate volume, I can hear
    cars with no difficulty whatsoever and of course it helps me to keep
    in tune as I sing, which improves the environment.

    I guess this is yet another thing which *must* be dangerous because
    otherwise cycling would be quite safe, and we can't have that sort of
    talk.

    Guy
    --
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

    85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
     
  8. John B

    John B Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:

    >
    > Having for years sworn that wearing headphones while cycling is
    > dangerous, I now wear headphones (connected to an iPod) while cycling.
    > The noise-cancelling Sennheiser phones I use reduces wind noise to the
    > point where I can hear the music at quite moderate volume, I can hear
    > cars with no difficulty whatsoever


    So you may believe. Have you carried out any tests?
    I would find it very surprising if your hearing were not restricted.
    Wearing headphones also promotes the idea to other road users that
    cyclists have no care for their own or others' safety.

    > and of course it helps me to keep
    > in tune as I sing, which improves the environment.


    :)

    John B
     
  9. > I would find it very surprising if your hearing were not restricted.

    Define restricted.
     
  10. triddletree

    triddletree Guest

    Mark Thompson wrote:
    >>I would find it very surprising if your hearing were not restricted.

    >
    >
    > Define restricted.


    Hearing less than if there were no headphones being used.

    tt
     
  11. Ian Smith wrote:
    > On Thu, 16 Feb 2006 07:26:37 +0000, Alan J. Wylie <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >>
    >> "If you're a cyclist and you want to stay alive, I wouldn't wear an
    >> iPod under any circumstances," Assistant Commissioner (Traffic) Noel
    >> Ashby told theage.com.au this afternoon.

    >
    > Well he's clearly a pillock. I am a cyclist. If I choose to wear an
    > iPod under the circumstances of (say) reclining at leisure in my
    > living room, will I immediately be struck dead?
    >
    > I expect he's one of those that thinks I must wear a helmet at all
    > times, too.


    I think many cyclists argue that it's more important to wear bike helmets in
    the bath, going up and down stairs, as a passenger or driver in a car and
    numerous other places, than when riding a bike.
    --
    Ambrose
     
  12. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    John B wrote:
    > "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:
    >
    > > The noise-cancelling Sennheiser phones I use reduces wind noise to the
    > > point where I can hear the music at quite moderate volume, I can hear
    > > cars with no difficulty whatsoever

    >
    > So you may believe. Have you carried out any tests?
    > I would find it very surprising if your hearing were not restricted.


    So you may believe. Have you carried out any tests?

    I'm with Guy in that I'd also assumed it must be dangerous until I'd
    tried it myself. I certainly don't notice any deterioration in my
    traffic awareness.

    --
    Dave...
     
  13. John B

    John B Guest

    dkahn400 wrote:

    > John B wrote:
    > > "Just zis Guy, you know?" wrote:
    > >
    > > > The noise-cancelling Sennheiser phones I use reduces wind noise to the
    > > > point where I can hear the music at quite moderate volume, I can hear
    > > > cars with no difficulty whatsoever

    > >
    > > So you may believe. Have you carried out any tests?
    > > I would find it very surprising if your hearing were not restricted.

    >
    > So you may believe. Have you carried out any tests?


    Not on a bike.
    However if I'm using headphones at home I know SWMBO and the children have to
    nudge me to get attention.
    It works the other way around too.
    Common sense tells me my hearing levels would be reduced if riding wearing
    'phones.

    > I'm with Guy in that I'd also assumed it must be dangerous until I'd
    > tried it myself. I certainly don't notice any deterioration in my
    > traffic awareness.


    If your hearing is reduced your awareness is likely to be lowered too. Brake
    noises, changes in engine tone, tyre screeching, even other riders' whirring
    gears as they come up behind, are all clues to traffic activities that may
    affect you. Even the sound of that rattling mudguard stay, or that bungee
    dangling against your back wheel may be missed, with potentially disastrous
    results.

    Wearing headphones also sends wrong messages to those who like to have any
    reason they can find to claim cyclists have no regard for road safety.

    IMO it is not a good idea.

    John B

    ..
     
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