Medium, Medium Rare

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Joelle, Jan 28, 2005.

  1. Joelle

    Joelle Guest

    Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?

    I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked but pink. My
    gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means not pink. Lately when we get
    our steaks at restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it and mine
    is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like. Sometimes
    we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus of what
    beef is supposed to look like or is it really subjective?

    And my son who likes his steak well done has given up ordering steak, it comes
    burned on the outside raw inside and takes several send backs to get it cooked.

    Okay and I'll admit we don't go to high end places. But still - shouldn't a
    $12 steak be cooked the way you want it?

    Joelle
    "The children who need love the most will always ask for it in the most
    unloving ways" ~ Words of a teacher quoted by Russell Barkley~
     
    Tags:


  2. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Joelle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >
    > I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked but pink.
    > My
    > gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means not pink. Lately when
    > we get
    > our steaks at restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it and
    > mine
    > is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like.
    > Sometimes
    > we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus of
    > what
    > beef is supposed to look like or is it really subjective?
    >
    > And my son who likes his steak well done has given up ordering steak, it
    > comes
    > burned on the outside raw inside and takes several send backs to get it
    > cooked.
    >


    I do not know of any "official" rules about this, but I do know that
    "medium" should certainly have a pink center. Once the pink is gone it
    enters the dreaded realm of well done. Maybe when you order you should
    describe how you want it - "pink in the center" - and not by the terms
    "medium" etc.


    --
    Peter Aitken

    Remove the crap from my email address before using.
     
  3. BOB

    BOB Guest

    Joelle wrote:
    > Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium
    > is?


    Probably not.

    >
    > I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant,
    > cooked but pink. My gentleman friend likes medium, which
    > to him means not pink. Lately when we get our steaks at
    > restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it
    > and mine is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think
    > what rare looks like. Sometimes we send it back,
    > sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus of
    > what beef is supposed to look like or is it really
    > subjective?


    You go to different places, their definitions will all be different.
    >
    > And my son who likes his steak well done has given up
    > ordering steak, it comes burned on the outside raw inside
    > and takes several send backs to get it cooked.
    >
    > Okay and I'll admit we don't go to high end places. But
    > still - shouldn't a $12 steak be cooked the way you want
    > it?
    >

    Back when I ate steaks in restuarants, I'd ask what *their* definition of
    rare or medium rare was (I never really cared about the others). Now,
    since I grill my own at home, if I get a $12 steak, it's a much better
    quality and also much larger than what the restaurant was selling, and it
    is always cooked exactly the way that *I* want it.

    BOB
     
  4. silentking

    silentking Guest

    Hello there,
    I work in a "Big Name" steakhouse. The kind where you pay $30.00 and up
    for a steak.
    First factor: The experience of the cook. Most places that I get a
    steak, it is always overcooked. I put the blame on the inexperience of
    the cook.
    Second Factor: The size of the steak. Thicker steaks take longer to
    cook. In low end restaurants, most rrestaurants that don't specialize in
    steaks, usually have the "thin" kind of steak. They cook much faster. In
    relation to factor #1, this amounts to overcooked steaks.

    Here are the cooking temps for beef:

    Rare (140°F)
    Med-rare (145°F)
    Medium (160°F)
    Med-well (165°F)
    Well (170°F)

    My steakhouse also offers "very Rare" as a menu option.
    There is also Black and Blue, which is burnt on the outside and raw on
    the inside.
    Pittsburgh also means burnt on the inside but cooked to the temp of your
    liking on the inside; usually rare or med-rare.

    Now for what the steak should look like at those temps:

    Very rare: purple raw center
    Rare: Cool red center
    MedRare: warm red center
    Med: Pink on the outside, red center
    Med Well: Mostly pink
    Well: grey, no color

    The biggest problem we have is the general ignorance of the general
    public at large about how steak should be cooked.
    That, coupled with factor one and two means that the general populace
    thinks that a medium rare steak should be pink, because most cooks
    overcook the crap out of their beef.
    Medium rare should have NO pink in it whatsoever.
    There also is a difference between raw and rare.
    Rare=red.
    Raw=purple.
    I completely agree that you should get the steak the way you want it
    cooked. When I eat at lower end placed and feel like a steak, I always
    order it rare now, because it usually comes out medium well. I usually
    eat my steaks medium rare, so at least with medium well, I still get a
    little bit of color left in my meat.
    Also think of the quality of the beef you get for $12. Usually choice,
    which is what you get at the supermarket.
    These are the different quality grades of beef:

    Prime, Choice, Select, Standard, Commercial, Utility, Cutter and Canner

    Prime is the best. If you have a "Big Name" steakhouse in your area, you
    really owe it to yourself to splurge and go there at least once.
    And I'm not talking about the Outback either.
    One restaurant in my area "proudly" serves Select Beef. Ew, gross.

    Seasoning of the steak also has a factor in the flavor. Most places use
    too much salt. Even more places don't season their steaks at all.

    Also how the steak is aged makes a huge amount of difference in how the
    steak tastes.
    Dry aging and wet aging are the two types.

    Warning, the next bit of info may be gross and you may never want to eat
    beef again:

    Dry aging is the traditional process of placing an entire carcass or
    wholesale cut (without covering or packaging) in a refrigerated room for
    21 to 28 days at 32-34 degrees F. and 80-85% relative humidity, with an
    air velocity of 0.5 to 2.5 m/sec. All three conditions, although varying
    widely in commercial practice, are extremely important in the proper
    postmortem aging of carcasses, as well as beef ribs and loins.

    A third method, accelerated aging uses a higher holding temperature with
    ultraviolet light used to retard microbial grown which would normally
    occur at higher temperatures. This method, however, has not been used
    commercially to a significant degree in recent years, due to the extent
    that vacuum packaged products are subjected to wet aging.

    Too much humidity will allow excessive microbial growth, whereas too
    little will cause excessive shrinkage. Eighty-five percent relative
    humidity is a happy medium in slowing microbial growth and moisture loss.

    Tenderness development can be accelerated by aging at a higher
    temperature; however, increased microbial growth becomes a serious
    problem at higher temperatures.

    Air velocity is essential because it acts as a medium for moisture
    removal from the refrigerated area. Insufficient air velocity will allow
    excessive moisture to condense on the product, and as a result,
    off-flavors and aromas, as well as spoilage, will occur. Too high an air
    velocity, on the other hand, will result in excessive surface drying,
    with resulting weight and trim losses. The main disadvantage of dry
    aging is the cost associated with these weight and trim losses.

    Wet aging is the aging of meat in vacuum bags (usually the middle meats)
    under refrigerated conditions of 32-34° F. Obviously, humidity and air
    velocity are not necessary requirements for proper wet aging. Because
    most beef is vacuum packaged at the site of carcass fabrication
    (cutting), wet aging is the predominant method of postmortem aging today.

    The aging process continues when a primal or subprimal cut has been
    placed in a vacuum package. By the We the cut reaches the retail store,
    at least 7-10 days have normally elapsed the following slaughter, due to
    holding at packing plant for carcass chilling and fabrication, inventory
    storage, shipping to the retail warehouse, and subsequent shipping to
    the retail store level. Therefore, the time associated with the rapid
    tenderization (7-10 days) and that associated with product movement to
    the retail store are similar. However, additional aging time is
    generally beneficial.

    So there you have a quick primer in eating cooking and preparing of steaks.
    Quality makes a huge difference in the enjoyment of your steaks.
    Even a prime, dry aged steak cooked well done, at the hands of a cook
    who knows what he is doing, can come out an enjoyable experience.
    So, splurge on a big name steakhouse, even if you have to drive 1 or 2
    hours to get to one, and write back to me and tell me how it was
    compared to your usual $12 steak. I think you will find a world of
    difference.

    P


    Joelle wrote:
    > Is there a consnsus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >
    > I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked but pink. My
    > gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means not pink. Lately when we get
    > our steaks at restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it and mine
    > is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like. Sometimes
    > we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus of what
    > beef is supposed to look like or is it really subjective?
    >
    > And my son who likes his steak well done has given up ordering steak, it comes
    > burned on the outside raw inside and takes several send backs to get it cooked.
    >
    > Okay and I'll admit we don't go to high end places. But still - shouldn't a
    > $12 steak be cooked the way you want it?
    >
    > Joelle
    > "The children who need love the most will always ask for it in the most
    > unloving ways" ~ Words of a teacher quoted by Russell Barkley~
     
  5. Fifo

    Fifo Guest

    silentking wrote:
    An excellent and massively informative post.
    Just wanted to say thank you.
     
  6. Dave Smith

    Dave Smith Guest

    Joelle wrote:

    > Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >
    > I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked but pink. My
    > gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means not pink. Lately when we get
    > our steaks at restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it and mine
    > is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like. Sometimes
    > we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus of what
    > beef is supposed to look like or is it really subjective?


    Have a look at this site. It has pictures that you may find helpful.
    http://et.sdsu.edu/radair/world_wide_weber/steak_doneness.htm


    > And my son who likes his steak well done has given up ordering steak, it comes
    > burned on the outside raw inside and takes several send backs to get it cooked.


    Why get steak for someone who likes it well done? I realize that people are
    entitled to their preferences, but it makes no sense to me to take a choice cut of
    meat and then cook out all the texture, taste and juices. People who like beef
    well done should stick to pot roast and hamburgers.

    > Okay and I'll admit we don't go to high end places. But still - shouldn't a
    > $12 steak be cooked the way you want it?


    BTW. You are brave to send food back to the kitchen. I have heard horror stories
    about what happens to it.
     
  7. Bob Myers

    Bob Myers Guest

    "Joelle" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]

    >
    > Okay and I'll admit we don't go to high end places. But still - shouldn't

    a
    > $12 steak be cooked the way you want it?
    >


    Yes, but I think the problem is in your terminology. As noted,
    it varies from place to place, but generally...

    "Rare" = Cool pink/red center (i.e., it's still somewhat "bloody")
    "Medium rare" = Warm pink center, actually still a bit red
    "Medium = Hot center but still distinctly pink
    "Medium well" = Very little pink remaining
    "Well-done" = No pink; cooked through.

    Anything beyond that is generally considered overdone, which
    doesn't mean that you're not free to order it if that's what you like
    - but you're getting to the point then where, in any place that prides
    itself on cooking steak, you will likely have to ask for a "VERY well-
    done" or some variant of that which tells them that you REALLY
    don't want to see anything remotely pinkish in your meat.

    Bob M.
     
  8. "silentking" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > Here are the cooking temps for beef:
    >
    > Rare (140°F) Med-rare (145°F) Medium (160°F) Med-well (165°F) Well (170°F)
    > >

    > Now for what the steak should look like at those temps:
    >
    > Very rare: purple raw center
    > Rare: Cool red center
    > MedRare: warm red center
    > Med: Pink on the outside, red center
    > Med Well: Mostly pink
    > Well: grey, no color


    I've never had that temperature-color correlation. I take a steak off the
    grill at 120 and it is pink, not red. A rib roast I'll get to 125 and pull
    it and let it rest. According to this, medium well is 165 and should be
    mostly pink. To me it would be tossed to the dog next door because it is
    gray. This is with a few different thermometers I use.
     
  9. Lucy

    Lucy Guest

    "silentking" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Hello there,
    > I work in a "Big Name" steakhouse. The kind where you pay $30.00 and up
    > for a steak.
    > First factor: The experience of the cook. Most places that I get a steak,
    > it is always overcooked. I put the blame on the inexperience of the cook.
    > Second Factor: The size of the steak. Thicker steaks take longer to cook.
    > In low end restaurants, most rrestaurants that don't specialize in steaks,
    > usually have the "thin" kind of steak. They cook much faster. In relation
    > to factor #1, this amounts to overcooked steaks.
    >
    > Here are the cooking temps for beef:
    >
    > Rare (140°F) Med-rare (145°F) Medium (160°F) Med-well (165°F) Well (170°F)
    >
    > My steakhouse also offers "very Rare" as a menu option.
    > There is also Black and Blue, which is burnt on the outside and raw on the
    > inside.
    > Pittsburgh also means burnt on the inside but cooked to the temp of your
    > liking on the inside; usually rare or med-rare.
    >
    > Now for what the steak should look like at those temps:
    >
    > Very rare: purple raw center
    > Rare: Cool red center
    > MedRare: warm red center
    > Med: Pink on the outside, red center
    > Med Well: Mostly pink
    > Well: grey, no color
    >
    > The biggest problem we have is the general ignorance of the general public
    > at large about how steak should be cooked.
    > That, coupled with factor one and two means that the general populace
    > thinks that a medium rare steak should be pink, because most cooks
    > overcook the crap out of their beef.
    > Medium rare should have NO pink in it whatsoever.
    > There also is a difference between raw and rare.
    > Rare=red.
    > Raw=purple.
    > I completely agree that you should get the steak the way you want it
    > cooked. When I eat at lower end placed and feel like a steak, I always
    > order it rare now, because it usually comes out medium well. I usually eat
    > my steaks medium rare, so at least with medium well, I still get a little
    > bit of color left in my meat.
    > Also think of the quality of the beef you get for $12. Usually choice,
    > which is what you get at the supermarket.
    > These are the different quality grades of beef:
    >
    > Prime, Choice, Select, Standard, Commercial, Utility, Cutter and Canner
    >
    > Prime is the best. If you have a "Big Name" steakhouse in your area, you
    > really owe it to yourself to splurge and go there at least once.
    > And I'm not talking about the Outback either.
    > One restaurant in my area "proudly" serves Select Beef. Ew, gross.
    >
    > Seasoning of the steak also has a factor in the flavor. Most places use
    > too much salt. Even more places don't season their steaks at all.
    >
    > Also how the steak is aged makes a huge amount of difference in how the
    > steak tastes.
    > Dry aging and wet aging are the two types.
    >
    > Warning, the next bit of info may be gross and you may never want to eat
    > beef again:
    >
    > Dry aging is the traditional process of placing an entire carcass or
    > wholesale cut (without covering or packaging) in a refrigerated room for
    > 21 to 28 days at 32-34 degrees F. and 80-85% relative humidity, with an
    > air velocity of 0.5 to 2.5 m/sec. All three conditions, although varying
    > widely in commercial practice, are extremely important in the proper
    > postmortem aging of carcasses, as well as beef ribs and loins.
    >
    > A third method, accelerated aging uses a higher holding temperature with
    > ultraviolet light used to retard microbial grown which would normally
    > occur at higher temperatures. This method, however, has not been used
    > commercially to a significant degree in recent years, due to the extent
    > that vacuum packaged products are subjected to wet aging.
    >
    > Too much humidity will allow excessive microbial growth, whereas too
    > little will cause excessive shrinkage. Eighty-five percent relative
    > humidity is a happy medium in slowing microbial growth and moisture loss.
    >
    > Tenderness development can be accelerated by aging at a higher
    > temperature; however, increased microbial growth becomes a serious problem
    > at higher temperatures.
    >
    > Air velocity is essential because it acts as a medium for moisture removal
    > from the refrigerated area. Insufficient air velocity will allow excessive
    > moisture to condense on the product, and as a result, off-flavors and
    > aromas, as well as spoilage, will occur. Too high an air velocity, on the
    > other hand, will result in excessive surface drying, with resulting weight
    > and trim losses. The main disadvantage of dry aging is the cost associated
    > with these weight and trim losses.
    >
    > Wet aging is the aging of meat in vacuum bags (usually the middle meats)
    > under refrigerated conditions of 32-34° F. Obviously, humidity and air
    > velocity are not necessary requirements for proper wet aging. Because most
    > beef is vacuum packaged at the site of carcass fabrication (cutting), wet
    > aging is the predominant method of postmortem aging today.
    >
    > The aging process continues when a primal or subprimal cut has been placed
    > in a vacuum package. By the We the cut reaches the retail store, at least
    > 7-10 days have normally elapsed the following slaughter, due to holding at
    > packing plant for carcass chilling and fabrication, inventory storage,
    > shipping to the retail warehouse, and subsequent shipping to the retail
    > store level. Therefore, the time associated with the rapid tenderization
    > (7-10 days) and that associated with product movement to the retail store
    > are similar. However, additional aging time is generally beneficial.
    >
    > So there you have a quick primer in eating cooking and preparing of
    > steaks.
    > Quality makes a huge difference in the enjoyment of your steaks.
    > Even a prime, dry aged steak cooked well done, at the hands of a cook who
    > knows what he is doing, can come out an enjoyable experience.
    > So, splurge on a big name steakhouse, even if you have to drive 1 or 2
    > hours to get to one, and write back to me and tell me how it was compared
    > to your usual $12 steak. I think you will find a world of difference.
    >
    > P

    silentking,
    Wow.. VERY informative for me. I found out, according to you, that I have
    been ordering my steaks wrong.. but oddly, they turn out like I wanted them,
    slightly more than half of the time. I'm going to change how I order them
    now.
    lucy :)
    p.s. incidentally, i notice you top posted (which I prefer actually)
    I guess the posting-nazis are sleeping one off. <grins!>
    lucy :)


    > Joelle wrote:
    >> Is there a consnsus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >>
    >> I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked but
    >> pink. My
    >> gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means not pink. Lately when
    >> we get
    >> our steaks at restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it and
    >> mine
    >> is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like.
    >> Sometimes
    >> we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus of
    >> what
    >> beef is supposed to look like or is it really subjective?
    >>
    >> And my son who likes his steak well done has given up ordering steak, it
    >> comes
    >> burned on the outside raw inside and takes several send backs to get it
    >> cooked.
    >>
    >> Okay and I'll admit we don't go to high end places. But still -
    >> shouldn't a
    >> $12 steak be cooked the way you want it?
    >>
    >> Joelle
    >> "The children who need love the most will always ask for it in the most
    >> unloving ways" ~ Words of a teacher quoted by Russell Barkley~
     
  10. In rec.food.cooking, silentking <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Rare (140?F)
    > Med-rare (145?F)
    > Medium (160?F)
    > Med-well (165?F)
    > Well (170?F)



    These temps seem VERY high to me. Also, the temps will vary depending on
    lots of different factors.

    Take a roast SLOWLY up to 140 in the center, and you'll NOT have rare
    meat. Ther will be very little or no redness. You'll be lucky if
    there's any pink left.

    Personally, I take roasts out at around 120 or 125, depending on various
    factors.

    For steaks, the temperature is pretty much irrelevant.
     
  11. In rec.food.cooking, Bob Miller <[email protected]> wrote:
    > http://lesleycooks.tripod.com/meattemperature.htm


    This site lists 160 as the ideal temp for a "medium" done Pork Roast!

    I once took off a pork roast at 141 and it was dry inside. Now I cook
    them to 130 and let them heat up to 138 or 140 as they rest. They are
    thourougly cooked, and very juicy.

    Medium-rare beef roast, 145!? Try 125 or so? Or less?


    Where do these sources get these temps?

    My guess is that they make allowance for the ignorant cook putting in the
    thermometer off center, so they use a high temp. Do they also allow for
    the thermometer to be miscalibrated by 10 degress or more? Maybe other
    factors are at play, causing them to do it?

    Can anybody tell me what the scoop is? Why do so many of these guides
    use such excessive temps?

    Does anybody know of a real guide? Does anybody here (who enjoys good
    meat, cooked medium rare or so) use any of these published guides?



    --
    In the councils of government, we must guard against the
    acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought,
    by the military-industrial complex. The potential for the
    disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist.
    -- Dwight David Eisenhower
     
  12. The Cook

    The Cook Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    >In rec.food.cooking, Bob Miller <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> http://lesleycooks.tripod.com/meattemperature.htm

    >
    >This site lists 160 as the ideal temp for a "medium" done Pork Roast!
    >
    >I once took off a pork roast at 141 and it was dry inside. Now I cook
    >them to 130 and let them heat up to 138 or 140 as they rest. They are
    >thourougly cooked, and very juicy.
    >
    >Medium-rare beef roast, 145!? Try 125 or so? Or less?
    >
    >
    >Where do these sources get these temps?
    >
    >My guess is that they make allowance for the ignorant cook putting in the
    >thermometer off center, so they use a high temp. Do they also allow for
    >the thermometer to be miscalibrated by 10 degress or more? Maybe other
    >factors are at play, causing them to do it?
    >
    >Can anybody tell me what the scoop is? Why do so many of these guides
    >use such excessive temps?
    >
    >Does anybody know of a real guide? Does anybody here (who enjoys good
    >meat, cooked medium rare or so) use any of these published guides?



    Consider the source. This is our old friend Chef R. W. Miller from
    Marriott(?).
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral, 48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)
     
  13. BOB

    BOB Guest

    The Cook wrote:
    >
    > Consider the source. This is our old friend Chef R. W.
    > Miller from Marriott(?).


    LOL!
     
  14. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Joelle wrote:
    > Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >
    > I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked but

    pink. My
    > gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means not pink. Lately

    when we get
    > our steaks at restaurants, his medium is about as pink as I'd like it

    and mine
    > is rare, I mean bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like.

    Sometimes
    > we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the consensus

    of what
    > beef is supposed to look like or is it really subjective?


    I would expect "medium" to be pink in the center and hot, more well
    done on the outside. "Medium rare would be like Medium, only mostly
    warm in the center and bloody. "Rare" would be barely cooked on the
    outside.

    -L.
     
  15. -L. wrote:

    > Joelle wrote:
    >
    >> Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >>
    >> I've always liked my beef medium rare, which to me meant, cooked
    >> but pink. My gentleman friend likes medium, which to him means
    >> not pink. Lately when we get our steaks at restaurants, his
    >> medium is about as pink as I'd like it and mine is rare, I mean
    >> bloody raw. I'd hate to think what rare looks like. Sometimes>
    >> we send it back, sometimes we just eat it, but what is the
    >> consensus of what beef is supposed to look like or is it really
    >> subjective?

    >
    > I would expect "medium" to be pink in the center and hot, more well
    > done on the outside. "Medium rare would be like Medium, only
    > mostly warm in the center and bloody. "Rare" would be barely cooked
    > on the outside.


    There are technical definitions used in food service.

    Rare = more than 60% cold red center
    med-rare = about 60% warm red center
    med = at least half warm pink center
    med-well = narrow stripe of hot pink center
    well = brown throughout

    Pastorio
     
  16. "Bob (this one)" wrote
    >> Joelle wrote:
    >>
    >>> Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >>>


    > There are technical definitions used in food service.
    >
    > Rare = more than 60% cold red center
    > med-rare = about 60% warm red center
    > med = at least half warm pink center
    > med-well = narrow stripe of hot pink center
    > well = brown throughout
    >
    > Pastorio
    >


    I always loved the definition of rare from older farhts than me. "Just put
    it under your arm, and walk it through the kitchen."

    Pam
     
  17. Ed Grabau and Pam Jacoby wrote:

    > "Bob (this one)" wrote
    >
    >>>Joelle wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >>>>

    >>There are technical definitions used in food service.
    >>
    >>Rare = more than 60% cold red center
    >>med-rare = about 60% warm red center
    >>med = at least half warm pink center
    >>med-well = narrow stripe of hot pink center
    >>well = brown throughout
    >>
    >>Pastorio
    >>

    > I always loved the definition of rare from older farhts than me. "Just put
    > it under your arm, and walk it through the kitchen."


    And you wouldn't have to add any seasoning beyond Old Spice.

    Pastorio
     
  18. "Bob (this one)"wrote ...
    > Ed Grabau and Pam Jacoby wrote:
    >
    >> "Bob (this one)" wrote
    >>
    >>>>Joelle wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Is there a consensus on what rare, medium rare and medium is?
    >>>>>
    >>>There are technical definitions used in food service.
    >>>
    >>>Rare = more than 60% cold red center
    >>>med-rare = about 60% warm red center
    >>>med = at least half warm pink center
    >>>med-well = narrow stripe of hot pink center
    >>>well = brown throughout
    >>>
    >>>Pastorio
    >>>

    >> I always loved the definition of rare from older farhts than me. "Just
    >> put it under your arm, and walk it through the kitchen."

    >
    > And you wouldn't have to add any seasoning beyond Old Spice.
    >
    > Pastorio
    >

    Dang, I miss those fine old restaurants. The infamous "they" have plowed
    under all the great ones in this town.

    Pam
     
  19. Pan Ohco

    Pan Ohco Guest

    On Thu, 03 Feb 2005 03:29:55 GMT, "Ed Grabau and Pam Jacoby" <pjjehg
    @frontiernet.net> wrote:

    >> Rare = more than 60% cold red center
    >> med-rare = about 60% warm red center
    >> med = at least half warm pink center
    >> med-well = narrow stripe of hot pink center
    >> well = brown throughout
    >>
    >> Pastorio
    >>

    >
    >I always loved the definition of rare from older farhts than me. "Just put
    >it under your arm, and walk it through the kitchen."
    >
    >Pam
    >

    "knock it horns off, wipe its butt, and put it on the plate"

    Pan Ohco



    The Earth is degenerating these days. Bribery and corruption abound.
    Children no longer mind their parents, every man wants to write a
    Book, and it is evident that the end of the world is fast approaching.
    --Assyrian stone tablet, c. 2800 B.C.
     
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