Melbourne Around the Bay in a Day 19th October 2003

Discussion in 'Australia and New Zealand' started by enock, Sep 19, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. enock

    enock New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2003
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I’m from Sydney and I’m attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any suggestions on good training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of the ride.

    I understand with the big bunches and relatively flat terrain that you can average high speeds.

    I’m a moderate road bike rider – cycle to work each day (45 km round trip) on Sydney’s north side so use to some hills.
     
    Tags:


  2. Nickzx6r

    Nickzx6r Guest

    enock <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I?m from Sydney and I?m attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any
    > suggestions on good training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of
    > the ride.

    > I understand with the big bunches and relatively flat terrain that you can average high speeds.

    > I?m a moderate road bike rider ? cycle to work each day (45 km round trip) on Sydney?s north side
    > so use to some hills.

    There's not really that much to it. It's pretty flat (although I spose that's a bit subjective) so
    as long as you can handle the distance you should be ok.

    Just make sure you have food and water. There are places to stop and restock along the way.

    I think the main thing is not to get sucked in by the fools who go hell for leather right from the
    start and then run out of energy well before the end :)

    Also, it might pay to have a waterproof jacket because the weather can be very changeable here in
    Melbourne.

    Cheers. -Nick
     
  3. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "enock" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm from Sydney and I'm attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any
    > suggestions on good training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of
    > the ride.
    >
    > I understand with the big bunches and relatively flat terrain that you can average high speeds.
    >
    > I'm a moderate road bike rider - cycle to work each day (45 km round trip) on Sydney's north side
    > so use to some hills.

    I was riding to work each day doing similar distance to you and than I was riding up to 160k's on
    the weekends. I only did this distance a few times before getting busy with other things on weekends
    so I'm not sure if it helped or not.

    I started the ride VERY slow.. actually, if it wasn't for my mate who insisted on taking it easy, I
    think I would have been one of the fools racing off at the start only to fatigue before the end. So,
    at the start we were passed by HEAPS of people. Most big bunches in ATB ride slower than the normal
    bunch rides I do. We got into a few bunches and did quite bit up the front (probably because I
    didn't like bunches much back then - I was a solo rider and bunches scared
    me). Spoke to quite a few people, saw some interesting contraptions such as 4-man bikes and
    recumbents. Before Sorrento we'd met a woman who was very easy to talk to. She was into "vaginal
    microbiside research". I don't think I will ever forget that! We rode with her until the end. I
    know there was a hill after Frankston but that was the only one I remember, the rest was flat. We
    had lunch while waiting for the ferry at Sorrento. Ferry trip was nice, sitting on the top deck,
    soaking in the sun's rays and using the engine vibrations for cheap thrills.. err.. massage
    therapy I mean! ;-) On the other side we took off again. Passed a guy with a track pump in his
    backpack! My butt and my lower back were killing me at this point so I was constantly moving
    around on the bike trying to get in a comfortable position. This was also causing me to want to
    speed up. I wanted to hammer. I held back for a while and I'd sprint off up the road and then
    turn around and met my mates. With a manageable distance to go (maybe 25k) I was passed by a fast
    dude. I said "tata" to my mates and the chase was on! If I remember right, he ran a red light or
    something so that made me really want to get him! I worked pretty hard in the last stages of the
    ride trying to nail this guy and I got him.. even with my slowing down for the view over the
    Westgate bridge.. :) I beat my goal time (whatever that was maybe <8 hours?) and had a bit of a
    race too. Plus I talked to heaps of people and picked one up for the distance :) Got our photo
    taken and ate fish and chips after it. I said I probably wouldn't do it again. I mean, I could do
    it alone, without paying ~$65. But this year my LBS guy has a team doing it so I've entered
    again. This might be a bit quicker than last then though because the team is full of race-types.
    What sort of bike/kit will you be using? I can keep and eye out for ya! :)

    hippy anything else you wanna know? Dial 1900 SHT TLK ;-)
     
  4. enock <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm from Sydney and I'm attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any
    > suggestions on good training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of
    > the ride.

    If there is wind anything like the wind today, half the trip will be awesome, the other half will
    absolutely suck!!!

    I am going to wait and see what the forecast is before I decide whether to do it or no. I don't have
    a touring bike, and the shogun doesn't really have suitable tyres. If I can get a more comfy seat
    for the dragster, higher gears, and there is no wind, I might just take that!!!
    ---
    DFM
     
  5. Andrew Swan

    Andrew Swan Guest

    Deep Freud Moors wrote:
    > If there is wind anything like the wind today, half the trip will be awesome, the other half will
    > absolutely suck!!!
    >
    > I am going to wait and see what the forecast is before I decide whether to do it or no. I don't
    > have a touring bike, and the shogun doesn't really have suitable tyres. If I can get a more comfy
    > seat for the dragster, higher gears, and there is no wind, I might just take that!!!
    > ---
    > DFM
    >
    >

    Actually on a hypothetical circular course (which I'm sure ATB is not), the wind helps you a lot
    less than 50% of the time. As any yachtsman can tell you, as your bike moves faster, the apparent
    wind draws ahead, i.e. towards the front of the bike.

    Wind needs to be in the 100 or so degree arc behind you in order to be of assistance.

    So the ride would suck for about 65-75% of the time, not just half! :)

    &roo
     
  6. Andrew Price

    Andrew Price Guest

    "enock" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I’m attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any suggestions on good
    > training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of the ride.
    >
    Have done a few of these so some observations.

    Get comfortable doing around 150km (say Peats Ridge and back on the north or Sublime Point and back
    on the south).

    Unless you have experience in bunch riding don't try to learn on this ride - you will probably link
    up with someone around your pace as it unfolds.

    Try to avoid getting cold - take 2 bottles and whatever you like to eat in your jersey so you can
    avoid stopping a lot or for too long.

    You will probably need a jacket or wind vest on the ferry - its surprisingingly cold when you stop
    peddling - and take all available cycling clothing with you to Melb esp arm warmers and longs and
    make your best guess of what to wear on the morning.

    The western side (Werribee, Altona, Geelong) is a bit dull, smells and is (usually but not always)
    the best side to do first in terms of adverse winds - I'm not convinced of that but it is the
    conventional wisdom.

    Leaving early and making an early ferry makes for a much shorter day (may need lights for the first
    half hour)

    Be prepared for a hunger bonk in the last 50k - replenish food stocks for the jersey when you can.

    When you finish do some stretches while waiting for mates to finish - gentle stretches and holds for
    30 seconds for your quads, hammies, glutes, hip flexors, adductors and calf muscles will get the
    recovery happening that much sooner - the massages they offer are nice but its the stretchs that
    really do you some good - don't care what brand , yoga, pilates or whatever, stretch back into shape
    the muscles you just tightened up a tad.

    Then go looking for a good late lunch - you have earned it and the endorphins will keep you high for
    a week, which is just as well because you won't feel like riding for a couple of days !

    Its a great day (way better than the 'gong) and a good place to get a taste for endurance riding.

    best, Andrew (remove the .x1 to reply)
     
  7. On Sun, 21 Sep 2003 01:20:45 GMT, "Andrew Price" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"enock" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    >> I’m attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any suggestions on good
    >> training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of the ride.
    >>
    >Have done a few of these so some observations.

    Good tips.

    <snip>

    >Try to avoid getting cold - take 2 bottles and whatever you like to eat in your jersey so you can
    >avoid stopping a lot or for too long.

    You'll probably get some handouts at the rest stations.

    <snip>

    >Leaving early and making an early ferry makes for a much shorter day (may need lights for the first
    >half hour)

    You will need lights if you start at 5:00. And it's the best time to start.

    Regards, Richard.
     
  8. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    yep some great tips from Andrew...

    2 bidons is mandatory...and I prefer to add a sports drink type powder to mine eg. isostar,
    gatorade, maxim etc...you also get a sachet in the food hamper at the ferry.

    yes you get fed when you line up for the ferry...just join the queue, and make sure you bring your
    ticket or no ferry!! eat your food on the ferry and fill up your bidons when you get to the other
    side (they have these huge bladders full of water with enough teats (well thats what they look like
    to me) to service many at once. :)

    Yes it does get cold on the ferry regardless of the day...travel as light as you can but take enough
    clothes ie. arm/leg warmers and a rain jacket just in case. Have found that the gel packs are great
    on the go food rather than just bananas which don't last as long in the energy department IMHO. Also
    jelly beans got me through the last 50kms or so (as I'd shove a few in my mouth every few kms!), so
    I always take a pack of them. Just don't emtpy them into your jersey pockets or they'll stain.

    Riding in a bunch is good fun and makes the kms go by that much quicker as the average tempo is
    higher than by yourself. Just make sure you are in a group that is compatible with you. There are
    all sorts of cyclists out there...experienced, inexperienced and yes even the down right dangerous!!

    As for training....you need to be able to ride for a long time so endurance is the key....some
    long steady rides up to 140kms was good enough for me last year...and I'd never ridden more than
    165kms before ATB, but there is always a group somewhere to sit in if you have had it (unless you
    are last!).

    And yes start early...less wind (if there is going to be any that day...and there usually is!) and
    less crowded on the ferry and if all else fails always someone behind you to keep you going!

    enjoy...cya there! Scotty

    "Andrew Price" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > "enock" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > I'm attempting this 210 km ride for the first time. Has anyone got any suggestions on good
    > > training, how to cope with the distance or even your personal experiences of the ride.
    > >
    > Have done a few of these so some observations.
    >
    > Get comfortable doing around 150km (say Peats Ridge and back on the north
    or
    > Sublime Point and back on the south).
    >
    > Unless you have experience in bunch riding don't try to learn on this
    ride -
    > you will probably link up with someone around your pace as it unfolds.
    >
    > Try to avoid getting cold - take 2 bottles and whatever you like to eat in your jersey so you can
    > avoid stopping a lot or for too long.
    >
    > You will probably need a jacket or wind vest on the ferry - its surprisingingly cold when you stop
    > peddling - and take all available
    cycling
    > clothing with you to Melb esp arm warmers and longs and make your best
    guess
    > of what to wear on the morning.
    >
    > The western side (Werribee, Altona, Geelong) is a bit dull, smells and is (usually but not always)
    > the best side to do first in terms of adverse winds - I'm not convinced of that but it is the
    > conventional wisdom.
    >
    > Leaving early and making an early ferry makes for a much shorter day (may need lights for the
    > first half hour)
    >
    > Be prepared for a hunger bonk in the last 50k - replenish food stocks for the jersey when you can.
    >
    > When you finish do some stretches while waiting for mates to finish -
    gentle
    > stretches and holds for 30 seconds for your quads, hammies, glutes, hip flexors, adductors and
    > calf muscles will get the recovery happening that much sooner - the massages they offer are nice
    > but its the stretchs that really do you some good - don't care what brand , yoga, pilates or
    whatever,
    > stretch back into shape the muscles you just tightened up a tad.
    >
    > Then go looking for a good late lunch - you have earned it and the endorphins will keep you high
    > for a week, which is just as well because
    you
    > won't feel like riding for a couple of days !
    >
    > Its a great day (way better than the 'gong) and a good place to get a
    taste
    > for endurance riding.
    >
    > best, Andrew (remove the .x1 to reply)
     
  9. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "Scotty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:7ahbb.4565
    > 2 bidons is mandatory...and I prefer to add a sports drink type powder to mine eg. isostar,
    > gatorade, maxim etc...you also get a sachet in the food hamper at the ferry.

    On that note.. fill each bidon with something different. I use water in one and
    gatorade/staminade in the other. If you are not used to drinking sports drinks - you might find
    two bottles of it all day a bit too much. Also, bottles that have anything other than water in
    them are hard to clean.. at least they are for me. I'm surprised my bottles don't run away
    actually.. but that's another matter...

    > Have found that the gel packs are great on the go food rather than just bananas which don't last
    > as long in the energy department IMHO.

    And they are smaller, lighter and much more "squish" resistant...

    I remember eating a jam sandwich last year. Just wrap it in cling wrap. Great change from all the
    fruit bars, energy drinks/gels, lollies and bananas.

    > And yes start early...less wind (if there is going to be any that
    day...and
    > there usually is!) and less crowded on the ferry and if all else fails always someone behind you
    > to keep you going!

    How early did you start? Mine start time will be decided by the team I'm with this year but I think
    last year I was in the 2rd or 3rd fastest starting bunch according to BV's suggestion. There was a
    wait for the ferry. Maybe 15-30mins moving through queues, eating lunch using toilets, etc?

    Hmm, I think I might have to start ramping up the k's.. just to see how I'm feeling with 150+.

    hippy
     
  10. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    we rode from Richmond down to the start and just kept going...it was around 6am from memory and we
    got in a group that stayed together until the first half decent climb about 40 or so kms down the
    road (as we went the melb-sorrento-queenscliff-melb direction), so it was pretty cruisy at first.
    Yeah didnt take long at the ferry, we did pass by lots of cyclists on the way and then queued a bit
    but went straight onto a ferry and then ate all our goodies. Hardest part is taking enough food but
    not too much that it ends up as baggage. I had 4 gel packs, packet of jelly beans, a muesli bar as
    well as the lunch you get at the ferry and it was about right. Started eating about 25-30kms in and
    kept it steady all the way.

    "hippy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > "Scotty" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:7ahbb.4565
    > > 2 bidons is mandatory...and I prefer to add a sports drink type powder
    to
    > > mine eg. isostar, gatorade, maxim etc...you also get a sachet in the
    food
    > > hamper at the ferry.
    >
    > On that note.. fill each bidon with something different. I use water in one and gatorade/staminade
    > in the other. If you are not used to drinking sports drinks - you might find two bottles of it all
    > day a bit too much. Also, bottles that have anything other than water in them are hard to clean..
    > at least they are for me. I'm surprised my bottles don't run away actually.. but that's another
    > matter...
    >
    > > Have found that the gel packs are great on the go food rather than just bananas which don't last
    > > as long in the energy department IMHO.
    >
    > And they are smaller, lighter and much more "squish" resistant...
    >
    > I remember eating a jam sandwich last year. Just wrap it in cling wrap. Great change from all the
    > fruit bars, energy drinks/gels, lollies and bananas.
    >
    > > And yes start early...less wind (if there is going to be any that
    > day...and
    > > there usually is!) and less crowded on the ferry and if all else fails always someone behind you
    > > to keep you going!
    >
    > How early did you start? Mine start time will be decided by the team I'm with this year but I
    > think last year I was in the 2rd or 3rd fastest starting bunch according to BV's suggestion. There
    > was a wait for the ferry. Maybe 15-30mins moving through queues, eating lunch using toilets, etc?
    >
    > Hmm, I think I might have to start ramping up the k's.. just to see how I'm feeling with 150+.
    >
    > hippy
     
  11. Al User

    Al User Guest

    hippy wrote:

    >...Also, bottles that have anything other than water in them are hard to clean.. at least they are
    >for me. I'm surprised my bottles don't run away actually.. but that's another matter...
    >

    A tip given to me by a veteran Audax-er for cleaning bidons - Milton Antibacterial Tablets. Fill up
    the bidon with warm water and 1 tablet, leave overnight and its as clean as a whistle.

    http://www.google.com.au/search?q=milton+tablet

    Al.
     
  12. Ritch

    Ritch Guest

    Al User <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > hippy wrote:
    >
    > >...Also, bottles that have anything other than water in them are hard to clean.. at least they
    > >are for me. I'm surprised my bottles don't run away actually.. but that's another matter...
    > >
    >
    > A tip given to me by a veteran Audax-er for cleaning bidons - Milton Antibacterial Tablets. Fill
    > up the bidon with warm water and 1 tablet, leave overnight and its as clean as a whistle.
    >
    > http://www.google.com.au/search?q=milton+tablet
    >
    > Al.

    While not discounting antibacterial tablets at all, I find an acceptable solution is to wash the
    bottles in the dishwasher, or by hand, rinse and rinse again with some vanilla essence. Vanilla
    essence is good for getting rid of smells. Of course, this is only effective if you wash the bottle
    soon after use - no crusty bits...

    Ritch
     
  13. gescom

    gescom New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm also thinking about riding ATB this year for the first time.

    What's the traffic like most of the way? Do you have to ride on the shoulder of the road or are road lanes set aside for the event?

    Can anyone else share their experiences of past events, good or bad?

    Thanks
     
  14. I use a tablespoon full of bleach, give it about 20 minutes, then rinse the bidon (or bladder) and
    then add a teaspoon of vanilla essence to the said bidon or bladder, then leave that for a day...

    "Ritch" <[email protected]etscape.net> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Al User <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > hippy wrote:
    > >
    > > >...Also, bottles that have anything other than water in them are hard to clean.. at least they
    > > >are for me. I'm surprised my bottles don't run away actually.. but that's another matter...
    > > >
    > >
    > > A tip given to me by a veteran Audax-er for cleaning bidons - Milton Antibacterial Tablets. Fill
    > > up the bidon with warm water and 1 tablet, leave overnight and its as clean as a whistle.
    > >
    > > http://www.google.com.au/search?q=milton+tablet
    > >
    > > Al.
    >
    > While not discounting antibacterial tablets at all, I find an acceptable solution is to wash the
    > bottles in the dishwasher, or by hand, rinse and rinse again with some vanilla essence. Vanilla
    > essence is good for getting rid of smells. Of course, this is only effective if you wash the
    > bottle soon after use - no crusty bits...
    >
    > Ritch
     
  15. Scotty

    Scotty Guest

    yep I use the dishwasher too...although I have put them in the bottom rack only to find the element
    has melted the mouth piece/top...so only put them in the top rack...doh!

    and after a while they do need replacing as they WILL get used and abused overtime and grotty on
    the outside.

    "Ritch" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Al User <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > hippy wrote:
    > >
    > > >...Also, bottles that have anything other than water in them are hard to clean.. at least they
    > > >are for me. I'm surprised my bottles don't run away actually.. but that's another matter...
    > > >
    > >
    > > A tip given to me by a veteran Audax-er for cleaning bidons - Milton Antibacterial Tablets. Fill
    > > up the bidon with warm water and 1 tablet, leave overnight and its as clean as a whistle.
    > >
    > > http://www.google.com.au/search?q=milton+tablet
    > >
    > > Al.
    >
    > While not discounting antibacterial tablets at all, I find an acceptable solution is to wash the
    > bottles in the dishwasher, or by hand, rinse and rinse again with some vanilla essence. Vanilla
    > essence is good for getting rid of smells. Of course, this is only effective if you wash the
    > bottle soon after use - no crusty bits...
    >
    > Ritch
     
  16. kochan

    kochan New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all! New here! I'm registered to go on ATB come the 19th of OCT. Had I couple of questions I needed to ask. Was hoping to get some help here.

    I only started cycling 4 months ago (Queen's Bday Weekend June) and haven't been on a bike since I was 9 years old before that. I did a total of about 215kms over 3 days last weekend with distances of 80-95 kms on 2 of those days. This week I intend to do about 120kms on Grand Final weekend, hopefully with a few decent hills in there. Then finally 150kms or so the week after before cutting back on the training altogether (ATB is 2 weeks from that).

    One simple question on this bit: Am I overtraining and if so what are the consequences? (Ok so that's 2 questions)

    Also - I don't really have much of a hill technique except for shifting down into a comfortable gear for pedalling easy at a cadence of 70-80. I tend to find I suffer from lower back pain even after short uphill sections though. I've read (from other posts here) that this can be caused by insufficient stretching of the Hamstrings or Back muscles.

    I'm wondering if it might have to do with poor back setup though.

    If it's relevant I ride an MTB with Slickies btw.

    Any help appreciated!
    Cheers!

    My Rant
    Ko-Chan
     
  17. Spider1977

    Spider1977 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    Messages:
    446
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ko-Chan,

    Sounds to me that you are under-prepared not over-prepared. Don't stop training two weeks out or you'll never make it. Do a solid ride the weekend before then taper off during the week by doing some easy spin work just to keep your muscles tuned and fresh for the big ride.

    If you are getting lower back problems going up hills it could be any number of reasons. Check your seating position, leg extension, even how you hold your back (my physio recommended trying to lift your chest up and out to get a good comfortable position for your back). That requires good core strength - maybe you should work on your abs.

    Also if you are trying to pump big gears going up hill, that could take it's toll on your back. If you are then use easier gears, let them do the work getting up the hill. On a very long ride you don't want to get pain in the early stages, because the whole trip will end up being a nightmare.

    Hope the weather is good and all you guys and gals doing this ride have a great time. It will be interesting to read your posts after the ride.

    BTW - Go Lions
     
  18. Hippy

    Hippy Guest

    "gescom" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I'm also thinking about riding ATB this year for the first time.

    Do it, do it! :)

    > What's the traffic like most of the way? Do you have to ride on the shoulder of the road or are
    > road lanes set aside for the event?

    I think (don't quote me!) that there are no lanes set aside. It was riding along the road like you
    (well, I) normally would. Traffic is not too bad given the early start, obviously heavier at the end
    of the ride. There are a few d*&ks that give out the usual attitude from the safety of their cars
    and quite a few friendly drivers too. Safety is pretty good given the sheer number of riders on the
    same stretch of road.

    > Can anyone else share their experiences of past events, good or bad?

    See my earlier post. The only "bad" thing I can recall, was a really, really sore butt... yes...
    from bike riding! :p

    hippy
     
  19. ProfTournesol

    ProfTournesol New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2003
    Messages:
    485
    Likes Received:
    0
    just to expand on this question... ATB is a long day, what about doing 'number 2s'? I was reading the Le Tour newsticker this year and it described this scenario for Jan Ullrich but described the scene as being 'too gruesome to describe'! What do people do if you 'can't wait'?

    In addition, how does one actually pee (off the bike) wearing a bib? Pulling down the front will stretch the fabric after a while (but if you've gotta go...) but how does one have a poo when in the middle of a long (cold) day or with no convenient trees, or in a suburban area (without a Maccas - they've got to be good for something) without totally disrobing?
     
  20. Spider1977

    Spider1977 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    Messages:
    446
    Likes Received:
    0
    Prof, Jan did it in a bucket held out the window of the team car, while still moving at the back of the peleton. Yes it is gruesome especially for the guy holding the bucket and the other people in the car I imagine.

    What a gruesome subject - find a public loo or go and knock on a door and ask to use the toilet. Most importantly take this thread elsewhere!:(
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...