Message direct to all fellow professional cyclists

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Ronde Champ, Jun 25, 2004.

  1. i dont race to beat other people, so i dont get frustrated... and i always tend
    to look at myself more than at anything else when i am searching for reasons
    and explainations... i could blame others for my dissapointments, or i could
    just take responsibility myself... i tend to think "i didnt win because i didnt
    ride fast enough (simplistic but true)" rather than "so and so is not natural
    and so it made it next to impossible for me to match his strength, fuck him"...
    one way seems too much like a lame excuse and the other is taking
    responsibility for my own part rather than placing blame on another (especially
    since it isnt 100% sure that i know so and so was charged)...thats probably the
    main thing that allows me to be cool about the issue... i race for me and how
    it makes me feel... i enjoy a challenge and maybe doping makes it more
    challenging?... i havent really thought much about my process in this matter...

    thats how i am in life anyway... i dont often look to apply blame... there is a
    difference between blame and responsibilty.. the best way to stay focused and
    happy is to always accept responsibility for things that effect you or things
    that you feel strongly about regardless of who is actually to blame... i just
    cant care about guys who want to take drugs.. i cant control them... all i can
    do is train the way i think i should and live the life i think i should... if
    guys take drugs or dont take drugs what does it change in the way i live?

    >We should've gotten more into this during the interview 'cause I
    >wholeheartedly disagree with you. Don't get me wrong, it's pretty
    >evident that gang fights in the street are a bigger issue than doping
    >in sports, but I don't understand how someone who makes their living
    >racing bikes can say, "I don't care if my competition cheats". That
    >just doesn't make any sense.
    >Maybe we should fight about it; I'm pretty sure I could take you.
    >
    >RB
     


  2. Jeff Jones

    Jeff Jones Guest

    "erik saunders" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > i dont race to beat other people, so i dont get frustrated... and i always

    tend
    > to look at myself more than at anything else when i am searching for

    reasons
    > and explainations... i could blame others for my dissapointments, or i

    could
    > just take responsibility myself... i tend to think "i didnt win because i

    didnt
    > ride fast enough (simplistic but true)" rather than "so and so is not

    natural
    > and so it made it next to impossible for me to match his strength, fuck

    him"...
    > one way seems too much like a lame excuse and the other is taking
    > responsibility for my own part rather than placing blame on another

    (especially
    > since it isnt 100% sure that i know so and so was charged)...thats

    probably the
    > main thing that allows me to be cool about the issue... i race for me and

    how
    > it makes me feel... i enjoy a challenge and maybe doping makes it more
    > challenging?... i havent really thought much about my process in this

    matter...
    >

    I can relate to this competely. I enjoy racing for many reasons, but winning
    isn't one of them because I don't do it very often :) Although I enjoy
    riding for its own sake and fitness benefits, nothing beats the speed and
    the atmosphere of a race. You can't get that in training. Each race is a new
    challenge - e.g. to see if you can last the distance; make the
    third/second/first group and be in contention for a top 30/20/10; or beat
    all the guys on the juice etc. But if you are not motivated and switched on
    mentally, you can forget it. If you see X go up the road and are 95 percent
    sure that he's not racing à l'Eau Claire, you don't just sit there and take
    it lying down, you go after him!! Not the least because there's a good
    chance you might stay away :)

    There's another aspect of placing blame/responsibility on others that
    applies to racing too. There are so many instances of breaks getting away
    because everyone in the peloton expects everyone else to chase. Don't
    hesitate and go after them (if you are able) is a tactic that pays well, I
    have found.

    Also, sometimes riders who dope think they are supermen, which may be true
    in part, but you can still beat them with better tactics and a bit of luck.
    I'm still chuckling about the guy last Satuday who made every attack and did
    every turn in his 53x12, raging at all of us in the group for the whole race
    (except when he was alone for three laps). This was one angry dude. After
    wasting a lot of energy, he only finished 10th (and last) in our group. I
    think the 14 was the biggest gear I used, and I also didn't apply the
    needless (sic) tactic of yelling at people. As a result, fourth place was
    for me even more satisfying.

    > thats how i am in life anyway... i dont often look to apply blame... there

    is a
    > difference between blame and responsibilty.. the best way to stay focused

    and
    > happy is to always accept responsibility for things that effect you or

    things
    > that you feel strongly about regardless of who is actually to blame...


    I agree. If you make a habit of blaming other people when things go wrong -
    even if it is justified - you'll be miserable the whole time.

    Jeff
     
  3. gym gravity <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Carl Sundquist wrote:
    >
    > > "kaiser" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]
    > >
    > >>In Pantani's case, he was injured during a period of heavy EPO use.
    > >>He badly broke his leg in a race and required extensive orthopaedic
    > >>surgery to repair it. When they tested his crit, it was so high they
    > >>had to postpone the surgery to figure out what was going on with his
    > >>blood.
    > >>
    > >>The next day, when they re-checked his crit, it had crashed to
    > >>dangerously low levels. He'd been abusing it for so long, he body
    > >>ceased production.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > Why do you think RBC production (or lack thereof) should effect huge swings
    > > in hematocrit levels on a day to day basis? IIRC, the typical lifespan of a
    > > mature RBC is 5-8 weeks.
    > >
    > >

    > Yeah. I read that he was being visited in hospital by his team doctors
    > and whatever it was that I read implied that they had something to do
    > with it. like that they bled him too much to lower it. The next day,
    > his crit was high again. this stuff couldn't be natural rbc destruction
    > and rebound.



    Maybe he was like Popeye and needed his spinach.
     
  4. chris

    chris Guest

    Oh, when you put it that way...I mean its Stuper Week.
    warren <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<260620041942046244%[email protected]>...
    > In article <[email protected]>, chris
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > You would think that, but it doesn't. Sometimes we f--k our bodies
    > > too much for them to sort it all out. Little injuries add up into big
    > > problems and hormone replacement can really screw you up. I can say
    > > for sure that I would steer clear of insulin, hGH and probably EPO
    > > because I want to function normally when I'm 55, rather than worrying
    > > about going blind or losing limbs.

    >
    > Not even for a few wins at Superweek?
    >
    >
    >
    > -WG
     
  5. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "Carl Sundquist" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > "kaiser" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > In Pantani's case, he was injured during a period of heavy EPO use.
    > > He badly broke his leg in a race and required extensive orthopaedic
    > > surgery to repair it. When they tested his crit, it was so high they
    > > had to postpone the surgery to figure out what was going on with his
    > > blood.
    > >
    > > The next day, when they re-checked his crit, it had crashed to
    > > dangerously low levels. He'd been abusing it for so long, he body
    > > ceased production.
    > >

    >
    > Why do you think RBC production (or lack thereof) should effect huge

    swings
    > in hematocrit levels on a day to day basis? IIRC, the typical lifespan of

    a
    > mature RBC is 5-8 weeks.


    That's why I was saying not to believe rumors. It isn't possible for there
    to be extremely high hematocrit one day and extremely low the next unless
    there is something VERY funny going on.
     
  6. Ronde Champ

    Ronde Champ Guest

    [email protected] (Ronde Champ) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hey,
    >
    > We all need to step back and recognize the damage the drugs are doing
    > to the sport of cycling. At the risk of revealing my true identity,
    > the sport of professional cycling is at risk due to the negative image
    > brought on by controversial drug use.
    > There are so many riders doing drugs, that it is really difficult for
    > the clean riders to compete. As Alex Zuelle said, "It's hard to do
    > 55mph when everyone else is doing 70mph." Well, until they remove
    > rules, and have an open category of no holds barred, this will always
    > be done in the shadows of cycling.
    > I'm not even calculating the long term health risks. Read up on how
    > many 45-50 year old former football players die from various organ
    > disorders. No 22 year old cyclist faced with the stark reality of
    > working a real job if they don't make it ever cares about this. They,
    > 'you' will live forever. And what's wrong with just stepping up for
    > this next big race. I'll only do it ONE time.
    > I know the same riders never care about sponsors. Think about why
    > they put cash into cycling. It isn't to make your dreams come true.
    > It's advertising 101. All the bad press cycling is getting threatens
    > to kill our sport. The sponsors will gravitate to other sports or ways
    > to get their brand out there. Look at mainstream press in this buildup
    > to the Tour de France. Find an article that doesn't mention drugs.
    > CEO's will not continue sponsoring if it means the could suffer a hit
    > to their company name and more importantly, bottomline and/or stock
    > price.
    > If everyone is doing the 'program', aren't we still just competing
    > against each other on a new level? It would be beautiful for my
    > wallet, health, mental state, and grandchildren to be, if we could
    > just race our bikes while remaining clean. The ironic thing is that
    > many of us started riding because it is so healthy. It makes you
    > strong, and can add quality to our years, and years to our life. What
    > we are all playing with tampers with that, and may even be the most
    > unhealthy thing we ever do to our body. Most o fthis has become back
    > alley, and unregulated. I'll shot this cause this veteran rider does.
    > I have know idea of side effects, other than I will ride real fast for
    > the next race.
    >
    > 5 years from now things will be much worse for our sport, or much
    > better. It will not continue down this same path. Maybe WADA and USADA
    > and IOC and UCI will actually win this war on drugs. For my health, I
    > hope so. Until then, I have a syringe waiting for me. It is Friday
    > after all. Shoot up day for a jobber pro like me. I have work to do
    > this weekend.
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Ronde Champ



    Greg. Shut your pie-hole.
     
  7. Jim Flom

    Jim Flom Guest

    "Ronde Champ" wrote...
    >
    > At the risk of revealing my true identity,


    This will require two forms of photo ID.

    JF
     
Loading...
Loading...