Methionine increases heart disease risk

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Juhana Harju, Mar 14, 2006.

  1. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    High dietary methionine increases the risk of heart disease according to a
    Finnish study. Meat is high in methionine, an amino acid.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006 Mar;16(2):113-20. Epub 2005 Nov 2.

    High dietary methionine intake increases the risk of acute coronary events
    in middle-aged men.

    Virtanen JK, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Happonen P, Mursu J, Laukkanen JA,
    Poulsen H, Lakka TA, Salonen JT.

    Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627,
    70211 Kuopio, Finland.

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Homocysteine, a methionine metabolite, is suggested to
    be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To date, the effects of
    dietary intake of methionine, the key amino acid in homocysteine metabolism,
    on CVD have not been studied. Our aim was to examine the effects of dietary
    methionine intake on the risk of acute coronary events. METHODS AND RESULTS:
    We examined the effects of dietary methionine intake, assessed with 4-d food
    record, on acute coronary events in a prospective cohort study consisting of
    1981 coronary disease free men from eastern Finland, aged 42-60years at
    baseline in 1984-89, in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor
    (KIHD) Study. During an average follow-up time of 14.0years, 292 subjects
    experienced an acute coronary event. In a Cox proportional hazards model
    adjusting for age, examination years, BMI, urinary nicotine metabolites and
    protein intake (excluding methionine) the relative risks of acute coronary
    event in the three highest quarters of dietary methionine intake were 1.31
    (95% CI: 0.92, 1.86), 1.31 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.96) and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.31,
    3.29) as compared with the lowest quarter. Further adjustments did not
    change the results. However, opposite association was observed with total
    protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk. CONCLUSIONS: The main
    finding of this study is that long-term, moderately high dietary methionine
    intake may increase the risk of acute coronary events in middle-aged Finnish
    men free of prior CHD. More prospective research is needed to confirm the
    role of dietary methionine in the development of CVD, and whether its
    effects are independent of homocysteine. PMID: 16487911

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/..._uids=16487911&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum

    --
    Juhana
     
    Tags:


  2. john77jack

    john77jack Guest

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  3. john77jack

    john77jack Guest

    Impotence can be caused by chronic diseases of the lungs kidneys,
    liver,heart, nerves and arteries. Endocrine system disorders like
    diabetes may also lead to ED problems. Adequate blood from to the penis
    can be hampered due to the accumulation of deposits (plaques) in the
    arteries causing ED. Low levels of the hormone testosterone (male
    hypogonadism) in some men may also lead to ED.
     
  4. Jim Chinnis

    Jim Chinnis Guest

    "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in part:

    >However, opposite association was observed with total
    >protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.


    So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    --
    Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA [email protected]
     
  5. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Jim Chinnis wrote:
    : Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    :
    :: However, opposite association was observed with total
    :: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    :
    : So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.

    I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when eating
    meat, but I have not seen the full study.

    --
    Juhana
     
  6. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:54:20 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :

    > Jim Chinnis wrote:
    >: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    >:
    >:: However, opposite association was observed with total
    >:: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    >:
    >: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    >
    > I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when eating
    > meat, but I have not seen the full study.



    horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g
    farmed trout fillets 4.89g
    grapes 4.60g
    ....
    beefsteak 2.90g

    X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition
     
  7. Juhana Harju wrote:
    > High dietary methionine increases the risk of heart disease according to a
    > Finnish study. Meat is high in methionine, an amino acid.


    Well, there it is!

    The next break through made by Mad Max and TC 'The Complainer' will be
    that free range beef, or perhaps Buffalo, is low in methionine. :(

    Just thought that you guys might not want to wait, to hear it from Mad
    Max.
     
  8. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Enrico C wrote:
    : On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:54:20 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    : <news:[email protected]> on
    : sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :
    :: Jim Chinnis wrote:
    ::: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    :::
    :::: However, opposite association was observed with total
    :::: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    :::
    ::: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    ::
    :: I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when
    :: eating meat, but I have not seen the full study.
    :
    : horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g
    : farmed trout fillets 4.89g

    Where did you get these figures? These are not correct. According to
    NutritionData the highest value of methionine is _dried_ Atlantic cod, which
    contains 1.86 g methionine/ 100g
    (http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-015084000000000000000-w.html)

    Some fish is high in methionine, but fish also contains some healthy
    substances like long chain omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids and selenium
    which outweigh the harmful effect of high methionine, IMHO.

    : grapes 4.60g

    That is not a correct figure either. Grapes contain about 16-21 mg
    methionine/ 100 g (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c20Ux.html)
    : ...
    : beefsteak 2.90g



    --
    Juhana
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>,
    "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Enrico C wrote:
    > : On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:54:20 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    > : <news:[email protected]> on
    > : sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :
    > :: Jim Chinnis wrote:
    > ::: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    > :::
    > :::: However, opposite association was observed with total
    > :::: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    > :::
    > ::: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    > ::
    > :: I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when
    > :: eating meat, but I have not seen the full study.
    > :
    > : horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g
    > : farmed trout fillets 4.89g
    >
    > Where did you get these figures? These are not correct. According to
    > NutritionData the highest value of methionine is _dried_ Atlantic cod, which
    > contains 1.86 g methionine/ 100g
    > (http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-015084000000000000000-w.html)
    >
    > Some fish is high in methionine, but fish also contains some healthy
    > substances like long chain omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids and selenium
    > which outweigh the harmful effect of high methionine, IMHO.
    >
    > : grapes 4.60g
    >
    > That is not a correct figure either. Grapes contain about 16-21 mg
    > methionine/ 100 g (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c20Ux.html)
    > : ...
    > : beefsteak 2.90g


    I'd hazard a guess that the act of eating is somewhat hazardous. Some
    foods like celery are innocuous yet we need more. So in the wisdom of
    our bodies we can eat all sorts of things and somehow take what we need
    and excrete the rest. Small items that are studied while perhaps true
    may not look at relationship aspects. Perhaps the ability to excrete
    wisely is diminished in time.
    I do not know but I try to eat smarter now than 40 years ago, but
    this knowledge is tainted by commercial folks trying to sell. Years ago
    I trusted my cats on what breads were the most desirable.

    Bill ..now where is that Japanese blow fish ;))

    Bill

    --
    Located In S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
    This article is posted under fair use rules in accordance with
    Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, and is strictly for the educational
    and informative purposes. This material is distributed without profit.
    Vision Problems? Look at http://www.ocutech.com/ ~us$1500
     
  10. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 00:04:52 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :

    > Enrico C wrote:
    >: On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:54:20 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    >: <news:[email protected]> on
    >: sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :
    >:: Jim Chinnis wrote:
    >::: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    >:::
    >:::: However, opposite association was observed with total
    >:::: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    >:::
    >::: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    >::
    >:: I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when
    >:: eating meat, but I have not seen the full study.
    >:
    >: horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g


    Correction... That should read....

    horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g *protein*

    It is the ratio of methionine on total protein in a given food.

    I think the methionine / total protein balance is meaningful, as
    methionine is the bad guy, but total protein is the good guy... :)


    > Where did you get these figures?


    From the INRAN (Italian Institute for Food and Nutrition Research)
    data base


    > These are not correct. According to
    > NutritionData the highest value of methionine is _dried_ Atlantic cod, which
    > contains 1.86 g methionine/ 100g
    > (http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-015084000000000000000-w.html)


    1.86 *mg* :)


    > Some fish is high in methionine,


    Some cheese too, and even pine nuts (731 mg /100 g according to
    Inran).

    > but fish also contains some healthy
    > substances like long chain omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids and selenium
    > which outweigh the harmful effect of high methionine, IMHO.
    >
    >: grapes 4.60g
    >
    > That is not a correct figure either. Grapes contain about 16-21 mg
    > methionine/ 100 g (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c20Ux.html)


    You are right again, I didn't report that correctly... it's methionine
    on total protein.

    >: beefsteak 2.90g




    X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition

    --
    Enrico C

    * cut the ending "cut-togli.invalid" string when replying by email *
     
  11. Jim Chinnis

    Jim Chinnis Guest

    "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in part:

    >Jim Chinnis wrote:
    >: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    >:
    >:: However, opposite association was observed with total
    >:: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    >:
    >: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    >
    >I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when eating
    >meat, but I have not seen the full study.


    I'm trying to get a copy. But I guess from the abstract one would conclude
    that eating foods with high ratios of protein to methionine is good. I guess
    that means more fruits and veggies and legumes and less meat, fish, and
    dairy. Maybe this will turn out to be a killer for the low-carb diet... This
    would create a challenge for me, since it's easier to keep weight off by
    watching carbs than by any other route I've tried.
    --
    Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
     
  12. Jim Chinnis wrote:
    > "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in part:
    >
    > >Jim Chinnis wrote:
    > >: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    > >:
    > >:: However, opposite association was observed with total
    > >:: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    > >:
    > >: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    > >
    > >I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when eating
    > >meat, but I have not seen the full study.

    >
    > I'm trying to get a copy. But I guess from the abstract one would conclude
    > that eating foods with high ratios of protein to methionine is good. I guess
    > that means more fruits and veggies and legumes and less meat, fish, and
    > dairy. Maybe this will turn out to be a killer for the low-carb diet... This
    > would create a challenge for me, since it's easier to keep weight off by
    > watching carbs than by any other route I've tried.


    It is wiser to watch how much you are eating rather than watching
    carbs.

    This is "easier" once you have befriended your healthy appetite (aka
    hunger) which increases with a nutritious varied diet that includes
    carbs.

    Will be available to "glow" and chat about this and other things like
    cardiology, diabetes, Bird Flu, the 2006 global earthquake advisory,
    cooking and nutrition that interest those following this thread here
    during the next on-line chat (03/16/06) from 6 to 7 pm EST:

    http://tinyurl.com/8w7uq

    For those who are put off by the signature, my advance apologies for
    how the LORD has reshaped me:

    http://tinyurl.com/7mcuo

    Prayerfully in Christ's love,

    Andrew
    http://tinyurl.com/rgsp8
     
  13. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Jim Chinnis wrote:
    : "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in part:
    :
    :: Jim Chinnis wrote:
    ::: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    :::
    :::: However, opposite association was observed with total
    :::: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    :::
    ::: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    ::
    :: I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when
    :: eating meat, but I have not seen the full study.
    :
    : I'm trying to get a copy.

    Please inform us more if you get one.

    : But I guess from the abstract one would
    : conclude that eating foods with high ratios of protein to methionine
    : is good. I guess that means more fruits and veggies and legumes and
    : less meat, fish, and dairy. Maybe this will turn out to be a killer
    : for the low-carb diet... This would create a challenge for me, since
    : it's easier to keep weight off by watching carbs than by any other
    : route I've tried.

    That is actually in line what I have been suggesting for people with insulin
    resistance and abdominal fat. I have been saying that for them it would be a
    good idea to limit carbs within the context of Mediterranean diet. That
    means consuming less red meat, but more legumes. I also think that EPA and
    DHA and other beneficial substances in fish outweigh the negative effect of
    high methionine in fish. So fish and especially fatty fish can be eaten.
    Actually the recent dietary recommendations of the Joslin diabetes center
    end up recommending this kind of diet also, although the word Mediterranean
    is not mentioned.

    --
    Juhana
     
  14. Juhana Harju

    Juhana Harju Guest

    Enrico C wrote:
    : On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 00:04:52 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    : <news:[email protected]> on
    : sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :
    :: Enrico C wrote:
    ::: On Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:54:20 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    ::: <news:[email protected]> on
    ::: sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :
    :::: Jim Chinnis wrote:
    ::::: Juhana Harju wrote in part:
    :::::
    :::::: However, opposite association was observed with total
    :::::: protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk.
    :::::
    ::::: So...I wonder which effect is larger when eating meat.
    ::::
    :::: I got the impression that the methionine effect is stronger in when
    :::: eating meat, but I have not seen the full study.
    :::
    ::: horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g
    :
    : Correction... That should read....
    :
    : horse-mackerel 4.90g methionine /100g *protein*
    :
    : It is the ratio of methionine on total protein in a given food.

    OK. *Now* I understand. :)

    : I think the methionine / total protein balance is meaningful, as
    : methionine is the bad guy, but total protein is the good guy... :)

    That makes sense. On the other hand, one should consider other bad and good
    guys as well, as in the case of fish which contains EPA and DHA.

    :: Where did you get these figures?
    :
    : From the INRAN (Italian Institute for Food and Nutrition Research)
    : data base
    :
    :: These are not correct. According to
    :: NutritionData the highest value of methionine is _dried_ Atlantic
    :: cod, which contains 1.86 g methionine/ 100g
    :: (http://www.nutritiondata.com/foods-015084000000000000000-w.html)
    :
    : 1.86 *mg* :)

    No. Look at the link I gave to you. It says 1859 mg which equates 1.86 g.
    ;-)

    :: Some fish is high in methionine,
    :
    : Some cheese too, and even pine nuts (731 mg /100 g according to
    : Inran).
    :
    :: but fish also contains some healthy
    :: substances like long chain omega-3 fatty acids, phospholipids and
    :: selenium which outweigh the harmful effect of high methionine, IMHO.
    ::
    ::: grapes 4.60g
    ::
    :: That is not a correct figure either. Grapes contain about 16-21 mg
    :: methionine/ 100 g
    :: (http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts-B00001-01c20Ux.html)
    :
    : You are right again, I didn't report that correctly... it's methionine
    : on total protein.

    OK.

    ::: beefsteak 2.90g

    --
    Juhana
     
  15. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 08:09:50 +0200, Juhana Harju wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :

    >: 1.86 *mg* :)
    >
    > No. Look at the link I gave to you. It says 1859 mg which equates 1.86 g.
    > ;-)


    Righto! :)

    X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition
     
  16. Enrico C

    Enrico C Guest

    On Thu, 16 Mar 2006 03:14:09 GMT, Jim Chinnis wrote in
    <news:[email protected]> on
    sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition :

    > I'm trying to get a copy. But I guess from the abstract one would conclude
    > that eating foods with high ratios of protein to methionine is good. I guess
    > that means more fruits


    Depends.
    Grapes have a very high methionine/total protein ratio.
    4.90g methionine /100g protein

    > and veggies and legumes and less meat,


    Depends.
    Venison meat has only 1.84g methionine /100g protein.

    > fish,


    Depends.
    Fresh anchovies are as low as 2.08.

    > and dairy.


    Depends.
    Ewe's milk ricotta has 2.13.

    > Maybe this will turn out to be a killer for the low-carb diet...


    I still trust my grandfather's words more than anything.
    "Eat a bit of everything".

    > This
    > would create a challenge for me, since it's easier to keep weight off by
    > watching carbs than by any other route I've tried.


    It's easy to overeat carbs. To avoid that risk, choose your sources of
    carbohydrate among the more satiating ones, usually those rich in
    fiber.

    X'Posted to: sci.med.cardiology,sci.med.nutrition
     
  17. Jim Chinnis

    Jim Chinnis Guest

    Enrico C <[email protected]> wrote in part:

    >I still trust my grandfather's words more than anything.
    >"Eat a bit of everything".


    "Everything" depends upon what is available to you that seems to be food.
    "Everything" is changing all the time.
    --
    Jim Chinnis Warrenton, Virginia, USA
     
  18. Robert

    Robert Guest

    "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > High dietary methionine increases the risk of heart disease according to a
    > Finnish study. Meat is high in methionine, an amino acid.
    >


    Just wanted to remind everybody that Homocysteine levels should be collected
    under fasting conditions to minimize dietary methionine levels.

    Homocysteine levels after a standard methionine loading dose can also be
    undertaken.
     
  19. Knack

    Knack Guest

    "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > High dietary methionine increases the risk of heart disease according to a
    > Finnish study. Meat is high in methionine, an amino acid.
    >
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006 Mar;16(2):113-20. Epub 2005 Nov 2.
    >
    > High dietary methionine intake increases the risk of acute coronary events
    > in middle-aged men.
    >
    > Virtanen JK, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Happonen P, Mursu J, Laukkanen
    > JA,
    > Poulsen H, Lakka TA, Salonen JT.
    >
    > Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627,
    > 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
    >
    > BACKGROUND AND AIM: Homocysteine, a methionine metabolite, is suggested to
    > be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To date, the effects
    > of
    > dietary intake of methionine, the key amino acid in homocysteine
    > metabolism,
    > on CVD have not been studied. Our aim was to examine the effects of
    > dietary
    > methionine intake on the risk of acute coronary events. METHODS AND
    > RESULTS:
    > We examined the effects of dietary methionine intake, assessed with 4-d
    > food
    > record, on acute coronary events in a prospective cohort study consisting
    > of
    > 1981 coronary disease free men from eastern Finland, aged 42-60years at
    > baseline in 1984-89, in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor
    > (KIHD) Study. During an average follow-up time of 14.0years, 292 subjects
    > experienced an acute coronary event. In a Cox proportional hazards model
    > adjusting for age, examination years, BMI, urinary nicotine metabolites
    > and
    > protein intake (excluding methionine) the relative risks of acute coronary
    > event in the three highest quarters of dietary methionine intake were 1.31
    > (95% CI: 0.92, 1.86), 1.31 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.96) and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.31,
    > 3.29) as compared with the lowest quarter. Further adjustments did not
    > change the results. However, opposite association was observed with total
    > protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk. CONCLUSIONS: The main
    > finding of this study is that long-term, moderately high dietary
    > methionine
    > intake may increase the risk of acute coronary events in middle-aged
    > Finnish
    > men free of prior CHD. More prospective research is needed to confirm the
    > role of dietary methionine in the development of CVD, and whether its
    > effects are independent of homocysteine. PMID: 16487911
    >
    > http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/..._uids=16487911&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum


    Don't worry about serum homocysteine levels. Earlier in the week there was
    another report about 2 homocysteine research studies to be published in NEJM
    on March 16.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/hsn/20060312/hl_hsn/folicacidsupplementswontlowerheartattackrisk
    An important conclusion that is *not* reported about these NEJM studies is
    that the latest scientific evidence shows homocysteine not to be a cause of
    cardiovascular disease; it can simply be a marker of it during a diet that
    does not include heavy vitamin B supplementation. Also, moderate coffee
    consumption (due to both caffeine and chlorogenic acid) can increase
    homocysteine level without causing cardiovascular disease.

    IOW, high homocysteine level can be an effect of either moderately high
    consumption of coffee, and/or red meat. Or it could be an effect of
    cardiovascular disease, but not the cause of that. Moreover, when
    supplementing with heavy doses of B vitamins, that effect disappears. Until
    the studies that I've cited above, it had been presumed that high
    homocysteine translated to increased cardiovascular risk, but now that idea
    has been dispelled.
     
  20. "Juhana Harju" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > High dietary methionine increases the risk of heart disease according to a
    > Finnish study. Meat is high in methionine, an amino acid.
    >
    > ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2006 Mar;16(2):113-20. Epub 2005 Nov 2.
    >
    > High dietary methionine intake increases the risk of acute coronary events
    > in middle-aged men.
    >
    > Virtanen JK, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Happonen P, Mursu J, Laukkanen
    > JA,
    > Poulsen H, Lakka TA, Salonen JT.
    >
    > Research Institute of Public Health, University of Kuopio, PO Box 1627,
    > 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
    >
    > BACKGROUND AND AIM: Homocysteine, a methionine metabolite, is suggested to
    > be a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). To date, the effects
    > of
    > dietary intake of methionine, the key amino acid in homocysteine
    > metabolism,
    > on CVD have not been studied. Our aim was to examine the effects of
    > dietary
    > methionine intake on the risk of acute coronary events. METHODS AND
    > RESULTS:
    > We examined the effects of dietary methionine intake, assessed with 4-d
    > food
    > record, on acute coronary events in a prospective cohort study consisting
    > of
    > 1981 coronary disease free men from eastern Finland, aged 42-60years at
    > baseline in 1984-89, in the Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor
    > (KIHD) Study. During an average follow-up time of 14.0years, 292 subjects
    > experienced an acute coronary event. In a Cox proportional hazards model
    > adjusting for age, examination years, BMI, urinary nicotine metabolites
    > and
    > protein intake (excluding methionine) the relative risks of acute coronary
    > event in the three highest quarters of dietary methionine intake were 1.31
    > (95% CI: 0.92, 1.86), 1.31 (95% CI: 0.88, 1.96) and 2.08 (95% CI: 1.31,
    > 3.29) as compared with the lowest quarter. Further adjustments did not
    > change the results. However, opposite association was observed with total
    > protein intake, which tended to decrease the risk. CONCLUSIONS: The main
    > finding of this study is that long-term, moderately high dietary
    > methionine
    > intake may increase the risk of acute coronary events in middle-aged
    > Finnish
    > men free of prior CHD. More prospective research is needed to confirm the
    > role of dietary methionine in the development of CVD, and whether its
    > effects are independent of homocysteine. PMID: 16487911
    >
    > http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/..._uids=16487911&query_hl=3&itool=pubmed_docsum
    >
    > --
    > Juhana


    Very, very weak. I'll continue to consume meat to my heart's content.
     
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