Metric Century through snow.. should I try? :)

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Mike Beauchamp, Nov 22, 2003.

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  1. Hey all, Last year my friend and I (both casual cyclists) did a metric century for lack of anything
    else to do. It was really fun, challenging and 75% on loose gravel! The trail used to be a
    railroad...

    Because I'm currently bored, I was toying with the idea of doing the same ride again, but in the
    winter. We get O.K. snowfall here (Windsor Ontario Canada), and I'd like to try it when there's a
    good amount of snow falling. I love the whole idea of the "two against the north" situation, being
    out there slowly riding through a foot or two of snow that nobody's ever walked on in the middle of
    nowhere for about 10 hours :)

    I'm wondering if anyone else has done any similar rides, and has any advice??

    Obviously it's totally different than a regular Century on road. So I'm just wondering what
    preparations I should make if I want to do this ride in a few months. Also, any specific
    modifications we should be making to our mountain bikes. Things we should and shouldn't carry, and
    suggestions for clothing, etc.

    100KM's in the snow seems like a lot to me, so I'd be willing to take it down to 50 or something
    reasonable depending on the situation/weather, etc.

    Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com
     
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  2. Mike, I grew up in Michigan and spent a lot of time riding on snow and
    ice. It's more stamina sapping than you think, trying to maintain balance, stopping, starting and
    turning. Add some dead weight to your bike might help (a sand bag? :)

    Mike Beauchamp wrote:

    > Hey all, Last year my friend and I (both casual cyclists) did a metric century for lack of
    > anything else to do. It was really fun, challenging and 75% on loose gravel! The trail used to be
    > a railroad...
    >
    > Because I'm currently bored, I was toying with the idea of doing the same ride again, but in the
    > winter. We get O.K. snowfall here (Windsor Ontario Canada), and I'd like to try it when there's a
    > good amount of snow falling. I love the whole idea of the "two against the north" situation, being
    > out there slowly riding through a foot or two of snow that nobody's ever walked on in the middle
    > of nowhere for about 10 hours :)
    >
    > I'm wondering if anyone else has done any similar rides, and has any advice??
    >
    > Obviously it's totally different than a regular Century on road. So I'm just wondering what
    > preparations I should make if I want to do this ride in a few months. Also, any specific
    > modifications we should be making to our mountain bikes. Things we should and shouldn't carry, and
    > suggestions for clothing, etc.
    >
    > 100KM's in the snow seems like a lot to me, so I'd be willing to take it down to 50 or something
    > reasonable depending on the situation/weather, etc.
    >
    > Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com
     
  3. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sat, 22 Nov 2003 22:47:47 -0500, <[email protected]>, "Mike Beauchamp"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >Obviously it's totally different than a regular Century on road. So I'm just wondering what
    >preparations I should make if I want to do this ride in a few months

    It's going to take considerably longer to complete. Go to the source > http://www.icebike.org/
    --
    zk
     
  4. Ron Hardin

    Ron Hardin Guest

    Mike Beauchamp wrote:
    >
    > Hey all, Last year my friend and I (both casual cyclists) did a metric century for lack of
    > anything else to do. It was really fun, challenging and 75% on loose gravel! The trail used to be
    > a railroad...

    If it's like the (active) railroad gravel around here, that would be pretty amazing.

    Very large gravs, and well above ground support. It's an anti-bike design I think. You can ride on
    it but balance is a problem and it's extremely slow.
    --
    Ron Hardin [email protected]

    On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  5. Here's a picture of what the trail looks like:

    http://beauchamp.relyon.ca/gallery/pelee05.html

    It's kinda cool actually, for what I can expect in "the car capitol of canada".

    Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

    "Ron Hardin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Mike Beauchamp wrote:
    > >
    > > Hey all, Last year my friend and I (both casual cyclists) did a metric century
    for
    > > lack of anything else to do. It was really fun, challenging and 75% on
    loose
    > > gravel! The trail used to be a railroad...
    >
    > If it's like the (active) railroad gravel around here, that would be
    pretty amazing.
    >
    > Very large gravs, and well above ground support. It's an anti-bike design
    I think.
    > You can ride on it but balance is a problem and it's extremely slow.
    > --
    > Ron Hardin [email protected]
    >
    > On the internet, nobody knows you're a jerk.
     
  6. Thanks dude, that link is great!!

    Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

    "Zoot Katz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Sat, 22 Nov 2003 22:47:47 -0500, <[email protected]>, "Mike Beauchamp"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >Obviously it's totally different than a regular Century on road. So I'm
    just
    > >wondering what preparations I should make if I want to do this ride in a
    few
    > >months
    >
    > It's going to take considerably longer to complete. Go to the source > http://www.icebike.org/
    > --
    > zk
     
  7. moonshdw

    moonshdw Guest

    Richard Adams <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Mike, I grew up in Michigan and spent a lot of time riding on snow and
    > ice. It's more stamina sapping than you think, trying to maintain balance, stopping, starting and
    > turning. Add some dead weight to your bike might help (a sand bag? :)

    Maybe you should just get a newspaper route? I got my fill of winter riding that way many
    years ago.
     
  8. Mike Kruger

    Mike Kruger Guest

    "Mike Beauchamp" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > Obviously it's totally different than a regular Century on road. So I'm
    just
    > wondering what preparations I should make if I want to do this ride in a few months

    For snow, knobbies will be just fine. Studs help with ice, but you asked about snow, didn't you? But
    it will be slow. Snow is somewhat like mud, only tastier (stay away from the yellow flavors). Virgin
    snow is the best, and riding during a snow shower is much fun.

    You may want to get one of those insulated water bottles. They are mostly made for summer use, but
    put hot tap water in them and they are good for 5 hours or so at 20F.

    I find it's hard to predict how difficult a snowy route will be. Under some conditions (e.g.
    rough ice from pedestrian usage underlying slush, or 8 inches of snow of any kind) I find it
    impossible. So, I'd be inclined to make it an adventure, but realize ahead of time that you may
    not be able to do 100km.
     
  9. Thanks for the reply.. I'm not expecting to get 100KM's done really, I just think that's an
    ultimate goal. Something to shoot for instead of just "going for a ride", I find it more fun that
    way I guess.

    I'm imagining the snow is going to be about 8-12" of virgin snow.. Obviously I'll check it out first
    and give it a trial run and everything..

    Thanks for the insulated bottle tip!!

    Mike http://mikebeauchamp.com

    "Mike Kruger" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Mike Beauchamp" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > Obviously it's totally different than a regular Century on road. So I'm
    > just
    > > wondering what preparations I should make if I want to do this ride in a few months
    >
    > For snow, knobbies will be just fine. Studs help with ice, but you asked about snow, didn't you?
    > But it will be slow. Snow is somewhat like mud, only tastier (stay away from the yellow flavors).
    > Virgin snow is the
    best,
    > and riding during a snow shower is much fun.
    >
    > You may want to get one of those insulated water bottles. They are mostly made for summer use, but
    > put hot tap water in them and they are good for 5 hours or so at 20F.
    >
    > I find it's hard to predict how difficult a snowy route will be. Under
    some
    > conditions (e.g. rough ice from pedestrian usage underlying slush, or 8 inches of snow of any
    > kind) I find it impossible. So, I'd be inclined to make it an adventure, but realize ahead of time
    > that you may not be able
    to
    > do 100km.
     
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