Mexican oregano

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by djs0302, Jan 19, 2006.

  1. djs0302

    djs0302 Guest

    I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    oregano and Mexican oregano?
     
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  2. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    djs0302 wrote:
    > I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > oregano and Mexican oregano?


    You can use it. Mexican oregano is a little lighter, with a hint of citrus
    taste, but your regular oregano should be fine for chili powder.

    Jill
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    djs0302 wrote:
    > I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > oregano and Mexican oregano?


    There's a good chance that what you have _is_ Mexican oregano if it's
    the regular dried version in a spice can. Greek oregano is a bit
    spicier (and actually harder to find), but you can interchange them in
    something like chili powder with no problem. -aem
     
  4. aem

    aem Guest

    aem wrote:
    > djs0302 wrote:
    > > I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > > oregano and Mexican oregano?

    >
    > There's a good chance that what you have _is_ Mexican oregano if it's
    > the regular dried version in a spice can. Greek oregano is a bit
    > spicier (and actually harder to find), but you can interchange them in
    > something like chili powder with no problem. -aem


    Got curious, so here's a followup from "fieryfoods.com" and its page on
    chile con carne:

    "Not all oregano is oregano. The European, or Greek oregano is actually
    wild marjoram (Origanum vulgare) that was also called oregano. The
    Caribbean oregano of Cuba, Trinidad, and Yucatán is really a coleus
    known as borage, which is also called Spanish thyme. The Mexican
    oregano (Lippia graveolens), which is stronger, is the true oregano for
    chili. Mexican oregano is usually sold in its dry form, but cooks can
    easily raise their own in herb gardens. If you can't find Mexican
    oregano, use marjoram."

    Personally, I think they're quite close. I get Mexican oregano in
    cellophane sacks at the Mexican grocery, and Greek oregano from the
    plant in my garden. I'm out of marjoram right now -- don't use it
    much. -aem
     
  5. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > oregano and Mexican oregano?
    >


    In my experience the Mexican is more potent as well as being subtly
    different in taste. Use more of the regular.


    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  6. In article <[email protected]>,
    "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > oregano and Mexican oregano?
    >


    Mexican oregano tastes more like Marjoram......

    at least my plant does. :)

    Cheers!
    --
    Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  7. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    djs0302 wrote:
    > I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > oregano and Mexican oregano?


    I don't particularly care for Mexican oregano, remeinds me of lawnmower
    scrapings... I bought some so many years ago I can't remember how long,
    it's still in my spice cabinet but it's only to remind me not to ever
    buy it again. I use Mediterranean style oregano (which is actually in
    the mint family) for everything calling for oregano.

    Regardless which spice blend, always mix up a small batch the first
    time to test if you like it. You can buy a small quantity of Mexican
    oregano (it's cheap) to try it. I think Mexican oregano is best
    reserved for smoking, if you're so inclined. I remember sitting
    on a verranda in Cozamel and just down the hill by the edge of small
    plane air strip there were some men tending to a brush fire. I asked
    the person next to me, a local, what was that sweet smell... he said
    Mexican oregano... now it may have been pot and he just didn't want to
    say.

    >From Penzeys:

    Oregano
    Mediterranean and Mexican oregano are two different plants, but because
    they are used in the same way and have a somewhat similar flavor they
    are both called oregano. Mediterranean oregano grows wild on the hilly
    mountainsides of southern Europe and is an essential ingredient in so
    many of the dishes from the region. For Italian spaghetti sauces to
    Greek salads to Turkish kebobs, the sweet, strong flavor of
    Mediterranean oregano is perfect. Our travel to this area has allowed
    us to import some wonderful Turkish Oregano, the best Mediterranean
    Oregano we've seen in years. Mexican oregano is stronger and less
    sweet, well-suited to the spicy, hot, cumin-flavored dishes of Mexico
    and Central America- perfect for chili and salsa. Both types of oregano
    should be added in the beginning of cooking, so the flavor has time to
    come out and meld with the other flavors of the dish. Add while
    browning onions or beef for both spaghetti sauce and chili.
    ---

    Merriam Webster

    oreg·a·no

    noun

    Etymology: American Spanish orégano, from Spanish, wild marjoram, from
    Latin origanum -- more at ORIGANUM

    1 : a bushy perennial mint (Origanum vulgare) that is used as a
    seasoning and a source of aromatic oil -- called also origanum, wild
    marjoram
    2 : any of several plants (genera Lippia and Coleus) other than oregano
    of the vervain or mint families
    ---


    Sheldon
     
  8. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 00:49:52 GMT, "Peter Aitken"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >>I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    >> oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    >> instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    >> oregano and Mexican oregano?
    >>

    >
    >In my experience the Mexican is more potent as well as being subtly
    >different in taste. Use more of the regular.


    Exactly. The first two responses are incorrect.

    -sw
     
  9. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 21:10:04 -0600, OmManiPadmeOmelet
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mexican oregano tastes more like Marjoram......


    You can smoke it, too. It's far better than any cigar or pipe
    tobacco. Or those damn cloves.

    -sw
     
  10. djs0302

    djs0302 Guest

    sarah bennett wrote:

    > somehow I doubt a pot of chili would be ruined by using regular oregano.


    That's not the point. Besides, I never said anything about making
    chili.
     
  11. djs0302 wrote:
    > sarah bennett wrote:
    >
    >
    >>somehow I doubt a pot of chili would be ruined by using regular oregano.

    >
    >
    > That's not the point. Besides, I never said anything about making
    > chili.
    >


    ok, fine. I mis-remembered the OP. You know, three parts vinegar to one
    part baking soda will work nicely as a substitute for the oregano, k?

    --

    saerah

    http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  12. djs0302

    djs0302 Guest

    sarah bennett wrote:

    > ok, fine. I mis-remembered the OP. You know, three parts vinegar to one
    > part baking soda will work nicely as a substitute for the oregano, k?
    >
    > --
    >

    Now you're just being hateful.
     
  13. djs0302 wrote:
    > sarah bennett wrote:
    >
    >
    >>ok, fine. I mis-remembered the OP. You know, three parts vinegar to one
    >>part baking soda will work nicely as a substitute for the oregano, k?
    >>
    >>--
    >>

    >
    > Now you're just being hateful.
    >


    If anyone was stupid enough to actually try that, they shouldn't be
    allowed near a stove :)

    --

    saerah

    http://anisaerah.blogspot.com/

    "Peace is not an absence of war, it is a virtue, a state of mind, a
    disposition for benevolence, confidence, justice."
    -Baruch Spinoza

    "There is a theory which states that if ever anybody discovers exactly
    what the Universe is for and why it is here, it will instantly disappear
    and be replaced by something even more bizarre and inexplicable. There
    is another theory which states that this has already happened."
    -Douglas Adams
     
  14. Vilco

    Vilco Guest

    Mi e' parso che aem abbia scritto:

    > "Not all oregano is oregano. The European, or Greek
    > oregano is actually wild marjoram (Origanum vulgare) that
    > was also called oregano.


    BTW, many people in southern Italy use to put some dried oregano
    in theyr salads.
    They start with the usual italian dressing for salads: EVOO +
    salt + wine vinegar, and then they add a pinch of oregano. I do
    this sometimes and it's a nice add-on.
    --
    Vilco
    Think Pink , Drink Rose'
     
  15. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    > sarah bennett wrote:
    >
    >> ok, fine. I mis-remembered the OP. You know, three parts vinegar to one
    >> part baking soda will work nicely as a substitute for the oregano, k?
    >>
    >> --
    >>

    > Now you're just being hateful.
    >


    The point is that in THIS PARTICULAR CASE, with the specific question you
    asked, a simple yes or no is of no benefit to you. You'd learn much more by
    searching for detailed information on the web, perhaps at gardening or
    cooking sites, or by getting a book from the library. When you stop
    learning, you're dead, for all intents and purposes. A yes or no answer does
    not honor your humanity, nor does it push you to be resourceful, a quality
    that's sadly lacking these days.
     
  16. Peter Aitken

    Peter Aitken Guest

    "Doug Kanter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    > You missed the point. Was the person asking how to make the dish? Or, the
    > noodles themselves? If the dish, the person was either a child, or a
    > complete idiot. There's a recipe on every box of lasagna I've seen in 35
    > years of cooking. If the noodles, they needed to elaborate.
    >


    Why is it so important for you to belittle others? Does it make you feel
    good about yourself?

    --
    Peter Aitken
    Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
     
  17. Doug Kanter

    Doug Kanter Guest

    "Peter Aitken" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "Doug Kanter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >>
    >>
    >> You missed the point. Was the person asking how to make the dish? Or, the
    >> noodles themselves? If the dish, the person was either a child, or a
    >> complete idiot. There's a recipe on every box of lasagna I've seen in 35
    >> years of cooking. If the noodles, they needed to elaborate.
    >>

    >
    > Why is it so important for you to belittle others? Does it make you feel
    > good about yourself?
    >
    > --
    > Peter Aitken
    > Visit my recipe and kitchen myths page at www.pgacon.com/cooking.htm
    >


    Peter, every so often, humanity panics because of the latest disease du
    jour, like bird flu. But, nobody notices an ongoing plague: People who are
    totally unable to figure things out for themselves because they've been
    conditioned (by TV, the web, who knows....) to expect instant information.
    This condition only gets worse if we allow it to, and we end up with a
    generation that opens books using a long stick, because the book might bite
    them.
     
  18. hob

    hob Guest

    "djs0302" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I have a recipe for homemade chili powder that calls for Mexican
    > oregano. I only have regular oregano on hand right now. Can I use it
    > instead or is there too much of a difference in flavor between regular
    > oregano and Mexican oregano?


    do you mean mexican oregano, or did you mean "mexican oregano", that kind
    usually found in special brownies ?

    sorry - had to ... :))

    >
     
  19. On Fri 20 Jan 2006 11:50:11a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Bob Myers?

    >
    > "Doug Kanter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> It reminds me of the person who, about 3 months ago, asked, "Can you
    >> make lasagna at home? How?"

    >
    > So what's wrong with that? Granted, to most of us who have spent
    > more than a few minutes passing through a kitchen, that seems like a
    > very, very basic (to the point of silliness, perhaps) question - but
    > we also have to realize that today, there's an awful lot of people out
    > there for whom "dinner" means something that came out of a plastic
    > tray you put in the microwave, or that you get only at a restaurant.
    > At least they're showing SOME interest in learning how to do it
    > themselves, and that sort of thing needs to be encouraged, not
    > ridiculed. If they turn out to be a troll, then fine - killfile 'em
    > later, and what have you really lost but a few minutes of time?
    >
    > Bob M.


    You don't understand, Bob. Doug's time is so valuable that he can't
    afford to lose a single second on anything he doesn't deem worthy.

    Don't you wish your time was worth that much? <g>

    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    __________________________________________________

    "One man's meat is another man's poison"
    - Oswald Dykes, English writer, 1709.
     
  20. Roberta

    Roberta Guest

    Bob Myers wrote:
    > "OmManiPadmeOmelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >>Google for "Mole'" ;-)

    >
    >
    > ..and ignore anything that turns up with respect to a small
    > undergroud-dwelling rodent...:)
    >
    > Bob M.
    >
    >
    >


    Yes - I can see how a rodent in the chili would be a bad thing LOL

    Roberta (in VA)
     
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