Mid Size SUV

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by frusso10, Dec 12, 2006.

  1. fish156

    fish156 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2005
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    0
    I carpool with a guy whose 2005 Element (5spd/manual) regulary gets 30mpg (mostly hwy miles). Those manual transmissions make a huge difference.

    My own solution is a Toyota Matrix 4wd. I installed a 1.25" receiver hitch and use a bike rack that will easily carry four bikes. Got to have 4wd where I live as we have wet and icy roads 4-5 months a year, and I ski. So, I'm looking to drive in bad conditions. With the rear seats folded down, I can fit tons of stuff in (including full length skis). I hate roof racks. Oh, and I'm getting 29-30 mpg regularly. I got rid of a 15mpg guzzler and feel pretty good about it. I would have got a Prius, but that is not a good car for sports where you need a lot of gear.
    I would recommend the Matrix and it has recently got excellent reliability ratings. The Pontiac Vibe is the "same" car for a couple of $K less.
     


  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,038
    Sir, you are as misinformed of your own country's firearms laws as you are about the vehicular needs of those that live differently from yourself.

    For example; in Canada, one can legally own a Sig 550 paratrooper with a barrel shorter than 16". not only can americans not own such a rifle without filing an ATF form 01 for a short-barrel rifle, they are not even imported here. Canada imposes a magazine capacity restriction, but the Sig is imported and sold there. I could go on, but suffice it to say you are way off base.

    If firearms are "childish", pray tell us what grown men on bicycles is?

    A single-shot for upland game? For dangerous game hunting? For varmint control? The Second Amendment to our constitution isn't about hunting anyway. It's about Freedom from tyrants. Tyrants that are nothing more than control freaks, forcing their personal philosophies on others.

    Machineguns are for FUN. That's right. They are as much fun as bicycling. Get over it and get over yourself. America has had ONE crime committed with a legally owned machine since the National Firearms Act of 1934 was passed. ONE. And that was by a COP that killed an informant. He was convicted and went to jail just like any criminal should.

    The rest of your points are so pathetic they deserve no wasted keystrokes. But feel free to continue trying to tell me what it is I need to drive and what i should and should not do in my life. As a matter of fact, i hope your little Focus saves lots of gallons of gas. That's more for me to burn. Thanks.

    Please note: Your ad hominem attacks and name-calling, along with your allusions and comparisons to criminals, only make your lack of logic and facts stand out in boldface.


    snaps,

    "and campybob, campy and machineguns what a mix, where are you, id love to come over some time."

    I'm in Ohio, near Canton (and not too far south of the People's Republic of Hamilton, from the sounds of it! just kidding there, Evil. I used to import Gardin bikes from mississauga and I like Canada and most of the Canadians I've met.). The scheduled date for Bulletfest VIII will be posted on my website shortly, probably right after the 4rth of July...and you might be surprised how many cyclists (and doctors, lawyers, engineers, teachers) are on the firingline. It would be my pleasure to set you (or any forum member that wants to try his hand at full-auto fun) up with few fast guns. Warning: They are as addicting as fast bicycles!

    Fine firearms and Campagnolo components both exhibit spectacular precision and workmanship. THEY are both just machines. Nothing more. There is no inherant goodness or evil within either of them (if so, we should ban forks for making Rosie O'Donnel fat!). Both provide me with fun and excersise and get me out in the fresh air.

    I also own horses and run a farm, not that Mr. Focus would understand such. We breed and sell quarter horses and I'm also a class 7 FFL with SOT (special occupation tax), a licensed manufacturer up to DD'S (destructive devices). By way of cycling history, i rode my first TOSRV and first race in 1972 and managed a paltry 19 miles after work (and before dark) this afternoon.

    I apologize to all for going so far adrift, but certain of Mr. Evil's points required addressing.
     
  3. Phill P

    Phill P New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2006
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    0
    I respect that campybob is into guns. My father was into target and clay shooting, he enjoyed it. Machine guns is different, but as long as he is respecting the rights of other people his interests are his interests.
    America and canada have proven that guns aren't the problem, its the people. Canada has more guns per head of population, but something like a tenth of the gun related crime. I'm not saying Americans are all gun weilding nuts, but something is different that is increasing the crime rate, and its not the guns.

    I also respect that for his chosen lifestyle he requires a vehicle that is a bit different to the rest of us. My question on his choice of vehicles is whether he's embraced diesel yet. Towing and most the activities he needs his large 4x4 for requires torque, not peak power at 5500rpm. Diesels have fantastic torque down low and very economical, hence its use in trucks and commercial vehicles. Europe has embraced the drivability of modern diesels, most people drive between 2000-4000 rpm (until on the autobarn) and the performance in this range of a turbo diesel blows most equivalent petrol cars away.

    Very few American designed/made vehicles including the SUVs run diesel (I know the F series has a 7.8L turbo V8), but most run large V8s to get the towing performance. The power and torque per litre is pretty poor compared to the newer european (and japanese) V8s. But then Americans (in general) own thier vehicles on average for less time than europeans, preferring to treat thier vehicles as disposable so look for lower sticker prices as a priority. Lower sticker price equals less technology and less money for developement. This in return has lead to people abandoning the big 3 to look for other products (now thier pockets are being hurt).
     
  4. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2005
    Messages:
    11,945
    Likes Received:
    1,038
    lmao!!:D

    I don't 'come after' folks though. 13 miles into the ride this morning I got dropped by two strong guys on a tandem and couldn't even muster 10 more rpm to go after them!

    I rode in the remaining 12 miles getting chased by a Romanian and an Englishman. It was 32° at the tat and I don't think my legs opened up before we finished. Oh well, I'm not complaining! That's nine days in a row on the bike. Darn good for December in snOwHIO.

    Just scouting a few of the bike club members' vehicles in the lot i saw: one Chrysler Town & Country van; one BMW 6xx series; one Nissan Pathfinder; one Jeep Cherokee (not mine); one Chevy Suburban; one Chevy Tahoe; one Dodge Ram 1500 4x4; one Toyota Camry; one Ford Explorer; one Subaru Outback.
     
Loading...