middle-aged beginner?

Discussion in 'Triathlon' started by Jean S. Barto, Jun 6, 2003.

  1. Hi Folks--

    Been thinking lately of training for sprint to Olympic distance triathlons, primarily because my
    body (mostly legs) can no longer take the wear and tear of just running, and I need to burn more
    calories than when I was younger.

    When I'm in shape and at a lighter weight I'm a 29:30 5K runner. Right now I'm recovering from an
    injury and can only run 1/4 mile or so before stopping to walk a bit. No idea on swimming or bike
    times, but I'm definitely faster swimming than running right now. I'm female, 48 years old, 5'3"
    tall and weigh 153 lbs right now, should weigh 120 or so.

    Are there websites/training programs out there for middle-aged beginners? Most sites out there seem
    to be geared to younger folks, or in any case those with natural athletic prowess!

    thanks in advance,

    Jean in VA

    --
    "If you are going through hell, keep going."

    Winston Churchill
     
    Tags:


  2. www.trinewbies.com

    -S-

    "Jean S. Barto" wrote:
    >
    > Hi Folks--
    >
    > Been thinking lately of training for sprint to Olympic distance triathlons, primarily because my
    > body (mostly legs) can no longer take the wear and tear of just running, and I need to burn more
    > calories than when I was younger.
    >
    > When I'm in shape and at a lighter weight I'm a 29:30 5K runner. Right now I'm recovering from an
    > injury and can only run 1/4 mile or so before stopping to walk a bit. No idea on swimming or bike
    > times, but I'm definitely faster swimming than running right now. I'm female, 48 years old, 5'3"
    > tall and weigh 153 lbs right now, should weigh 120 or so.
    >
    > Are there websites/training programs out there for middle-aged beginners? Most sites out there
    > seem to be geared to younger folks, or in any case those with natural athletic prowess!
    >
    > thanks in advance,
    >
    > Jean in VA
    >
    > --
    > "If you are going through hell, keep going."
    >
    > Winston Churchill
     
  3. Topdog

    Topdog Guest

    "Jean S. Barto" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi Folks--
    >
    > Been thinking lately of training for sprint to Olympic distance triathlons, primarily because my
    > body (mostly legs) can no longer take the wear and tear of just running, and I need to burn more
    > calories than when I was younger.
    >
    > When I'm in shape and at a lighter weight I'm a 29:30 5K runner. Right now I'm recovering from an
    > injury and can only run 1/4 mile or so before stopping to walk a bit. No idea on swimming or bike
    > times, but I'm definitely faster swimming than running right now. I'm female, 48 years old, 5'3"
    > tall and weigh 153 lbs right now, should weigh 120 or so.
    >
    > Are there websites/training programs out there for middle-aged beginners? Most sites out there
    > seem to be geared to younger folks, or in any case those with natural athletic prowess!
    >
    > thanks in advance,
    >
    > Jean in VA

    Check with your local runner's store, or the nearest one. Same for a tri store or swimmer's store.
    They should have a list of coaches - many offer beginner's level classes for a reasonable fee. Here
    locally, they offer a 10 week program several times a year for like $150. I'd imagine that you
    should be able to find something similar there.
     
  4. Theodor Seiz

    Theodor Seiz Guest

    I dont think that trinewbies is of any relevance to you. If I were you I´d:

    1. Check my cardiovascular health and get a doctors clearance
    2. Check my lactate levels running and biking and get my individual training zones
    3. Train for about 5-10 hours - something like: week 1: 5h week 2: 6h week 3: 7h week 4: 5h
    (Recovery) week 5: 5,5 h week 6: 6,5 h week 7: 7,5 h week 8: 5 h (Recovery)

    Train only in zone I and II and only in I during recovery weeks.

    4. DONT DIET !!!! - Try to eat healthy food but never mix training with diet. Eat whatever you like
    but try to like apples more than alcohol, white wheat and sweets :)

    5. Dont compete for 1/2 a year
    6. Have the test in 2 redone after 6 months and get a decent trainer than

    7. Have your first sprint triathlons not in the zone recommended but much easier - Ironman pace.
    Nobody cares how fast you are and you will feel much better - and its easier to improve when you
    get experienced and can race at higher intensities.

    Feel free to email me for questions - but I am a beginner myselve [email protected]

    >> Been thinking lately of training for sprint to Olympic distance triathlons, primarily because my
    >> body (mostly legs) can no longer take the wear and tear of just running, and I need to burn more
    >> calories than when I was younger.
    >>
    >> When I'm in shape and at a lighter weight I'm a 29:30 5K runner. Right now I'm recovering from an
    >> injury and can only run 1/4 mile or so before stopping to walk a bit. No idea on swimming or bike
    >> times, but I'm definitely faster swimming than running right now. I'm female, 48 years old, 5'3"
    >> tall and weigh 153 lbs right now, should weigh 120 or so.
    >>
    >> Are there websites/training programs out there for middle-aged beginners? Most sites out there
    >> seem to be geared to younger folks, or in any case those with natural athletic prowess!
    >>
    >> thanks in advance,
    >>
    >> Jean in VA
    >>
    >> --
    >> "If you are going through hell, keep going."
    >>
    >> Winston Churchill
     
  5. Theodor Seiz wrote:
    >
    > I dont think that trinewbies is of any relevance to you. If I were you I´d: -snip-

    Why? It's a fine site for someone considering their first triathlon. And I don't know why she ought
    to take your advice over that on trinewbies.

    -S- http://www.kbnj.com
     
  6. Theodor Seiz

    Theodor Seiz Guest

    On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 15:26:56 -0400, Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Theodor Seiz wrote:
    >>
    >> I dont think that trinewbies is of any relevance to you. If I were you I´d: -snip-
    >
    >Why? It's a fine site for someone considering their first triathlon. And I don't know why she ought
    >to take your advice over that on trinewbies.
    >
    >-S- http://www.kbnj.com

    I agree with not taking my advice, but I am still not convinced of trinewbies being relevant for
    beginners. Most of the training advice there - especially the training plans - offer far too much
    variety and speed work for people without a proper base. And a step by step approach should - in my
    opinion - start with a doctors clearance.

    Other than that, I think that an absolute beginner gets lost there and recommend half a year of base
    training before starting to train for specific events. I like trinewbies a lot and think its very
    good for beginners with about a year of base training under theyre belt, a decent endurance base and
    the rules and tools of the road (or pool) firmly established.

    My advice is simply not to dive into semi professional training before knowing how to handle
    yourselve in the pool, on the bike or running. My recommendation was highly personal, I admit being
    a beginner myselve (though I think already on trinewbies level :- ) )... In this sport you are a
    beginner for a long time and I think that with some experience (slow races and base training) you
    profit more from the excellent advice given there.
     
  7. Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote in news:3EE23C80.A06B3FD0 @fridayscomputer.com:

    > Theodor Seiz wrote:
    >>
    >> I dont think that trinewbies is of any relevance to you. If I were you Iïd: -snip-
    >
    > Why? It's a fine site for someone considering their first triathlon.
    >

    Or their 50th, for that matter.
     
  8. Jim Gosse

    Jim Gosse Guest

    1. On the tri-newbies web site for a 10 week sprint beginner program, the very first line is consult
    your physician.

    2. On the program, week one consists of one 200 yard swim, two 5 mile bike rides, and two 1 mile
    runs. I'd hardly consider this a semi pro program, and you couldn't get more simple.

    3. They give rules of thumb to keep your training target heart rate in check without bothering with
    lactate testing.

    4. Taylor this or any other schedule to fit your personal schedule.

    Best of luck, I hope all this info is not too much for you to take in. Triathlon is a great sport.
    You'll probably meet some nice people once you get started, and remember, everyone had to start
    somewhere.

    "Theodor Seiz" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sat, 07 Jun 2003 15:26:56 -0400, Steve Freides <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Theodor Seiz wrote:
    > >>
    > >> I dont think that trinewbies is of any relevance to you. If I were you I´d: -snip-
    > >
    > >Why? It's a fine site for someone considering their first triathlon. And I don't know why she
    > >ought to take your advice over that on trinewbies.
    > >
    > >-S- http://www.kbnj.com
    >
    > I agree with not taking my advice, but I am still not convinced of trinewbies being relevant for
    > beginners. Most of the training advice there - especially the training plans - offer far too much
    > variety and speed work for people without a proper base. And a step by step approach should - in
    > my opinion - start with a doctors clearance.
    >
    > Other than that, I think that an absolute beginner gets lost there and recommend half a year of
    > base training before starting to train for specific events. I like trinewbies a lot and think its
    > very good for beginners with about a year of base training under theyre belt, a decent endurance
    > base and the rules and tools of the road (or pool) firmly established.
    >
    > My advice is simply not to dive into semi professional training before knowing how to handle
    > yourselve in the pool, on the bike or running. My recommendation was highly personal, I admit
    > being a beginner myselve (though I think already on trinewbies level :- ) )... In this sport you
    > are a beginner for a long time and I think that with some experience (slow races and base
    > training) you profit more from the excellent advice given there.
     
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