middle eastern rice pudding

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by John D. Misrahi, Mar 24, 2004.

  1. I am looking for a recipe for a sort of middle eastern rice
    pudding..They serve it at a local lebanese restaurant. It is
    flavoured with pistachios and/or rosewater..It is creamy but
    pretty thin, if that makes any sense.

    I don't even know what the proper name for it is..

    any help would be appreciated

    john
     
    Tags:


  2. Goomba38

    Goomba38 Guest

    "John D. Misrahi" wrote:

    > I am looking for a recipe for a sort of middle eastern
    > rice pudding..They serve it at a local lebanese
    > restaurant. It is flavoured with pistachios and/or
    > rosewater..It is creamy but pretty thin, if that makes
    > any sense

    Would that be Kheer? I think that is the spelling? It's a
    lovely Indian rice pudding. Goomba
     
  3. [email protected] responds to....
    >"John D. Misrahi" wrote: I am looking for a recipe for a
    >sort of middle eastern rice pudding..They serve it at a
    >local lebanese restaurant. It is flavoured with pistachios
    >and/or rosewater..It is creamy but pretty thin, if that
    >makes any sense
    with inquiry of
    >Would that be Kheer? I think that is the spelling? It's a
    >lovely Indian rice pudding. Using just the "askjeeves"
    search engine there seem to be several pages you could look
    through here:
    http://web.ask.com/web?o=0&qsrc=0&q=kheer+recipe

    Picky ~JA~
     
  4. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Wed, 24 Mar 2004 21:40:12 GMT in <jzk8c.1255$%%[email protected]
    01.sprint.ca>, [email protected] (John D. Misrahi) wrote :

    >I am looking for a recipe for a sort of middle eastern rice
    >pudding..They serve it at a local lebanese restaurant. It
    >is flavoured with pistachios and/or rosewater..It is creamy
    >but pretty thin, if that makes any sense.
    >
    The Indian version is Kheer. The Persian variety is called
    Shir Berenj. There are multiple variants - each country in
    the Middle East seems to have a slightly different take on
    it. AFAIK the concept was invented in Persia and diffused
    out from there. Kheer is typically made only with milk,
    while Shir Berenj is more high-test, containing cream as
    well. Here's recipes for both.

    Kheer

    6 cups milk
    2/8 cup short-grain rice - pudding rice or Arborio,
    Carnaroli, etc.
    3/8 cup water 2 tbsp rosewater 2 tbsp sugar 8 cardamom pods
    1 oz. pistachios, approx. 1 oz. almonds, approx.

    Put the rice and water in a pot and allow to soak
    overnight. Bring the rice to a quick boil, stirring
    constantly, boiling until all the water has been absorbed.
    Pour all the milk in, and immediately reduce the heat as
    low as it will go. Cook for 1 1/2 - 2 hours, or until very
    thick, stirring occasionally. Split the cardamom pods,
    grind the seeds, and add to the mix. Briefly cook (about 5
    minutes), then add the rosewater, stir, heat for about 1
    minute, and remove from the heat. Stir in the sugar. Pour
    into ramekins or small bowls. Chill until cool. Just before
    serving, chop up the pistachios and almonds finely (use a
    knife, NOT a food processor, for this operation) and
    sprinkle on top. Serve. Serves 4.

    Shir Berenj follows the same recipe, but instead of all
    milk, you use 4 cups of milk and 2 cups of cream. You add
    only the milk at the beginning, and pour in the cream at the
    same time you add the sugar, i.e. as you pull it off the
    stove. In Shir Berenj, also, you top only with pistachios -
    so double the amount of those and eliminate the almonds.

    You can also make both hot instead of cold - delicious in
    winter. Simply reduce the amount of milk by 2 cups, heat the
    cream, if any, before stirring in, and eat as soon as you
    get it off the stove.

    If you don't like how thick the mixture turns out, you can
    easily change it by increasing or reducing the amount of
    milk. There's a range of textures you can produce, from
    firm and holding its own shape (4 cups), to very loose and
    runny (8 cups).

    --
    Alex Rast [email protected] (remove d., .7,
    not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  5. Alex, I have eaten this but had no clue about making it.
    Thanks for posting this, it's really delicious.

    Wayne

    [email protected] (Alex Rast) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > at Wed, 24 Mar 2004 21:40:12 GMT in <jzk8c.1255$%%[email protected]
    > 01.sprint.ca>, [email protected] (John D. Misrahi)
    > wrote :
    >
    >>I am looking for a recipe for a sort of middle eastern
    >>rice pudding..They serve it at a local lebanese
    >>restaurant. It is flavoured with pistachios and/or
    >>rosewater..It is creamy but pretty thin, if that makes
    >>any sense.
    >>
    > The Indian version is Kheer. The Persian variety is called
    > Shir Berenj. There are multiple variants - each country in
    > the Middle East seems to have a slightly different take on
    > it. AFAIK the concept was invented in Persia and diffused
    > out from there. Kheer is typically made only with milk,
    > while Shir Berenj is more high-test, containing cream as
    > well. Here's recipes for both.
    >
    > Kheer
    >
    > 6 cups milk
    > 5/8 cup short-grain rice - pudding rice or Arborio,
    > Carnaroli, etc.
    > 5/8 cup water 2 tbsp rosewater 2 tbsp sugar 8 cardamom
    > pods 1 oz. pistachios, approx. 1 oz. almonds, approx.
    >
    > Put the rice and water in a pot and allow to soak
    > overnight. Bring the rice to a quick boil, stirring
    > constantly, boiling until all the water has been absorbed.
    > Pour all the milk in, and immediately reduce the heat as
    > low as it will go. Cook for 1 1/2 - 2 hours, or until very
    > thick, stirring occasionally. Split the cardamom pods,
    > grind the seeds, and add to the mix. Briefly cook (about 5
    > minutes), then add the rosewater, stir, heat for about 1
    > minute, and remove from the heat. Stir in the sugar. Pour
    > into ramekins or small bowls. Chill until cool. Just
    > before serving, chop up the pistachios and almonds finely
    > (use a knife, NOT a food processor, for this operation)
    > and sprinkle on top. Serve. Serves 4.
    >
    > Shir Berenj follows the same recipe, but instead of all
    > milk, you use 4 cups of milk and 2 cups of cream. You add
    > only the milk at the beginning, and pour in the cream at
    > the same time you add the sugar,
    > i.e. as you pull it off the stove. In Shir Berenj, also,
    > you top only with pistachios - so double the amount
    > of those and eliminate the almonds.
    >
    > You can also make both hot instead of cold - delicious in
    > winter. Simply reduce the amount of milk by 2 cups, heat
    > the cream, if any, before stirring in, and eat as soon as
    > you get it off the stove.
    >
    > If you don't like how thick the mixture turns out, you can
    > easily change it by increasing or reducing the amount of
    > milk. There's a range of textures you can produce, from
    > firm and holding its own shape (4 cups), to very loose and
    > runny (8 cups).
     
  6. Lynn Gifford

    Lynn Gifford Guest

    Kheer

    4 C whole milk 2 T basmati rice (white) 4 Cardamom pods
    lightly crushed Cook at a simmer over low heat for well
    over an hour ...until it's reduced to 2 C of milk. Pick
    out the cardamom Stir in 1/4 C sugar, or to taste Flavor
    with a spoonful of rosewater or orange blossom water
    Garnish with chopped pistachios and pomegranite seeds.
    Chill very very well.

    I also have a recipe using whole milk and Cream of Rice!
    Lynn from Fargo
     
  7. Dimitri

    Dimitri Guest

    "John D. Misrahi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jzk8c.1255$%%[email protected]...
    > I am looking for a recipe for a sort of middle eastern
    > rice pudding..They serve it at a local lebanese
    > restaurant. It is flavoured with pistachios and/or
    > rosewater..It is creamy but pretty thin, if that makes
    > any sense.
    >
    > I don't even know what the proper name for it is..
    >
    > any help would be appreciated
    >
    > john
    Will this do?

    Dimitri

    Moohalabiyeh

    10 servings

    200 g ground rice
    1.5 kg Milk (lukewarm) 300 g sugar 20 g orange flower water
    500 g almonds and pistachios

    Add water to ground rice, enough to make a paste, then add
    this paste to the milk , and cook slowly until thickened (
    stirring constantly) add sugar and lastly add orange flower.
    Pour into serving cups, let cool , and top with blanched
    almonds or pistachios
     
  8. Limey

    Limey Guest

    "Lynn Gifford" wrote in message

    > Kheer
    >
    > 4 C whole milk 2 T basmati rice (white) 4 Cardamom pods
    > lightly crushed Cook at a simmer over low heat for well
    > over an hour ...until it's reduced to 2 C of milk. Pick
    > out the cardamom Stir in 1/4 C sugar, or to taste Flavor
    > with a spoonful of rosewater or orange blossom water
    > Garnish with chopped pistachios and pomegranite seeds.
    > Chill very very well.
    >
    > I also have a recipe using whole milk and Cream of Rice!
    > Lynn from Fargo

    Where would I buy rosewater or orange blossom water? Would
    they be health food store items?

    Dora
     
  9. On Thu, 25 Mar 2004 10:47:45 -0500, limey <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Where would I buy rosewater or orange blossom water? Would
    > they be health food store items?

    Hi Dora! I found both at a nearby Middle Eastern
    grocery, but have also seen rosewater (not sure about
    orange blossom) at an Indian grocery store. Health
    food stores are worth a look.

    Ariane
     
  10. On Thu, 25 Mar 2004 17:33:16 GMT, Ariane Jenkins
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 25 Mar 2004 10:47:45 -0500, limey
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Where would I buy rosewater or orange blossom water?
    >> Would they
    be health
    >> food store items?
    >
    > Hi Dora! I found both at a nearby Middle Eastern
    > grocery, but have also seen rosewater (not sure
    > about orange blossom) at an Indian grocery store.
    > Health food stores are worth a look.
    >
    >Ariane
    >

    Our local health food store had rosewater. aloha, Thunder

    http://www.smithfarms.com
    Farmers & Sellers of 100%
    Kona Coffee & other Great Stuff
     
  11. Lynn Gifford

    Lynn Gifford Guest

    "limey" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > Where would I buy rosewater or orange blossom water? Would
    > they be health food store items?
    >
    > Dora
    ======================================
    Maybe in a health food store, more likely in a middle
    eastern store or an Indian store.

    They are not expensiVe - under $3 a bottle (will last you
    forever) Lynn from Fargo
     
  12. Limey

    Limey Guest

    "limey" wrote in message >
    > Where would I buy rosewater or orange blossom water?
    > Would they be
    health
    > food store items?
    >
    > Dora

    Thanks, everyone!

    Dora
     
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