Midges

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Gary, Jun 22, 2003.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Gary

    Gary Guest

    Just back from a camping / cycling weekend in Aberfoyle - let me tell you, the Midges were an
    absolute nightmare.

    We pitched tent in a fairly large clearance in a field around 7:30pm - average weather. After
    pitching the tent, we sat in it for maybe 30 minutes and suddenly started to hear what sounded like
    gentle rain. Opened the front door and I am not exaggerating when I say around 2000 midges had
    gathered at the door. We got out the tent as quickly as possible, probably swallowing 30 of the
    little shites as we ran for cover. After getting a thick hooded top on and tying the hood tight
    around my head, leaving only space for my eyes, I dismantled the tent and stuck it in the car -
    managed to find a proper camp site, took the highest point in a good breeze and the midges were no
    were to be seen.

    Next day, we started our cycle and managed to stay Midge free until Loch Katrine. Around two mile
    around Loch Katrine I started to swallow hordes of the little buggurs and every part of my body was
    being bitten! My eyes were also filling with Midge and I was infuriated, cursing terribly at the
    annoying little shits. Around 5 mile of the Loch Katrine section was swarming with Midge and there
    was no real way of escape, just cycled as fast as I could and looked forward to the open road.

    After Loch Katrine the Midges seemed to fade away, although I now look like I have the worst case of
    measles you have ever seen. I finished the cycle around 5:30 pm and I am still itching like mad, I
    must say it has put a total damper on an otherwise perfect weekend.

    If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these midge are on steroids.

    Gary.
     
    Tags:


  2. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <QWeJa.1777$%[email protected]>,
    "Gary" <[email protected]> writes:

    > After Loch Katrine the Midges seemed to fade away, although I now look like I have the worst case
    > of measles you have ever seen. I finished the cycle around 5:30 pm and I am still itching like
    > mad, I must say it has put a total damper on an otherwise perfect weekend.
    >
    > If you are planning cycling in the Trossachs soon, be warned - these midge are on steroids.

    Sounds like a lovely weekend (except for the bugs). As for the bites, I've found Noxzema Skin Cream
    pretty well "cures" no-see-um bites, and greatly soothes mosquito bites. Maybe it would work with
    midge bites, too? My Pauline can't stand the smell of the Noxzema, but the trick is to just not
    smell it ;-)

    Anyhow, you inspired me to do a web search on "aberfoyle cycling". The links that turned-up indicate
    practically idyllic cycling adventures. Enjoy the Trossachs.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 22 Jun 2003 09:47:28 GMT, "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just back from a camping / cycling weekend in Aberfoyle - let me tell you, the Midges were an
    >absolute nightmare.

    Midges? A problem? In Scotland? Surely not!

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  4. Pbwalther

    Pbwalther Guest

    >Next day, we started our cycle and managed to stay Midge free until Loch Katrine. Around two mile
    >around Loch Katrine I started to swallow hordes of the little buggurs and every part of my body was
    >being bitten!

    Gee Gary. The word "midge" is used to refer to the adult of the chironomid family. These guys look a
    bit like mosquitos to most people but they are not and they don't bite. About the worse thing they
    do is gather in swarms and "bug" people. Chironomids are also used as pollution indicators. The
    chiromid larvae live in aquatic sediments and can tolerate very low oxygen levels. So anytime you
    get a bunch of chiromids in a bottom sample, you know the oxygen level is low and you start thinking
    pollution.

    There was no way that adult chironomids or "midges" could have bitten you. There must have been some
    mosquitos in the mix also. Or I guess it could have been no see ums or black flies or............

    Oh, I am an entomologist.
     
  5. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 24 Jun 2003 13:49:18 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:

    >The word "midge" is used to refer to the adult of the chironomid family. These guys look a bit like
    >mosquitos to most people but they are not and they don't bite.

    Is the wrong answer. Try Googling on "Scottish biting midge" (Culicoides impunctatus) if you don't
    believe me :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
  6. On 24 Jun 2003 13:49:18 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:

    >Oh, I am an entomologist.

    If you eat well and get plenty of rest, you'll get over it.
     
  7. The inhabitants of the Isle of Arran (ever been there? - beautiful, innit?) boast they sport the
    fiercest midges in the Western world, scoffing at the mere striplings, the callow youths, found
    round Loch Katrine.

    On Tue, 24 Jun 2003 21:47:45 GMT, Zippy the Pinhead <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 24 Jun 2003 13:49:18 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:
    >
    >>Oh, I am an entomologist.
    >
    >If you eat well and get plenty of rest, you'll get over it.
     
  8. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Pbwalther wrote:

    > >Next day, we started our cycle and managed to stay Midge free until Loch Katrine. Around two mile
    > >around Loch Katrine I started to swallow hordes of the little buggurs and every part of my body
    > >was being bitten!
    >
    > Gee Gary. The word "midge" is used to refer to the adult of the chironomid family. These guys look
    > a bit like mosquitos to most people but they are not and they don't bite. About the worse thing
    > they do is gather in swarms and "bug" people. Chironomids are also used as pollution indicators.
    > The chiromid larvae live in aquatic sediments and can tolerate very low oxygen levels. So anytime
    > you get a bunch of chiromids in a bottom sample, you know the oxygen level is low and you start
    > thinking pollution.
    >
    > There was no way that adult chironomids or "midges" could have bitten you. There must have been
    > some mosquitos in the mix also. Or I guess it could have been no see ums or black flies
    > or............
    >
    > Oh, I am an entomologist.

    Of course the term "midge" used in this aspect is a local language thing. The OP obviously meant
    some sort of biting insect. Not mosquitoes, but some sort of fly, like a black fly or no seeum. In
    Northern Ontario, people would say "lot of flies tonight" when the evening was thick with
    mosquitoes. Of course they knew them as mosquitoes as well, but most used the local term "flies".

    I rode thru a thick cloud of noseeums this afternoon beside a thicket on the shore of the Fraser
    River. They were really tiny and the swarm was thick as fog. hundreds got trapped between my helmet
    and forehead, and bit like tiny red hot wires. Had to stop and wipe them off with my bandana. Will I
    ever learn to stop taking the scenic route?

    Best regards, and don't forget the "OFF", Bernie
     
  9. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 25 Jun 2003 13:10:30 GMT, [email protected] (Pbwalther) wrote:

    >Well that is the problem with the common names of insects. Had he said "biting midge" I would have
    >suspected that he was referring to something besides Chironomus.

    Heh! Since he said they bit, I kind of thought it was implied :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com Advance
    notice: ADSL service in process of transfer to a new ISP. Obviously there will be a week of downtime
    between the engineer removing the BT service and the same engineer connecting the same equipment on
    the same line in the same exchange and billing it to the new ISP.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...