Mike Jacoubowsky, great letter in velonews

  • Thread starter Crescentius Vespasianus
  • Start date



C

Crescentius Vespasianus

Guest
Bill wrote:
> Mike I enjoyed your comments.
> http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I could
> have been there.
> Bill
>
>

-----------------
The only way they could of got me there
is the same way they got those taliban
prisoners to Gitmo.
 
D

datakoll

Guest
On Aug 13, 3:44 pm, "Bill" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Mike I enjoyed your comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I could
> have been there.
> Bill


yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
versus
hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
>> Mike I enjoyed your
>> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
>> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
>> could
>> have been there.
>> Bill

>
> yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
> getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
> overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
> versus
> hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...


The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we climbed
the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way to
the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of the
riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any bar
and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take care
of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.

So what was your complaint again?

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
 
D

datakoll

Guest
On Aug 14, 2:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> Mike I enjoyed your
> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
> >> could
> >> have been there.
> >> Bill

>
> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
> > versus
> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>
> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we climbed
> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way to
> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of the
> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any bar
> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take care
> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.
>
> So what was your complaint again?
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com


lsten mike, humor directed at the TdF and France, is distinct from
your opinions and wonderful experiences at the TdF, as it supports
your post, opinions and wonderful experiences at the TdF while I sit
here in an A/C room watching Versus and Phil Ligget and...
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo-www.vecchios.com

Guest
On Aug 14, 12:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> Mike I enjoyed your
> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
> >> could
> >> have been there.
> >> Bill

>
> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
> > versus
> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>
> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we climbed
> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way to
> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of the
> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any bar
> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take care
> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.
>
> So what was your complaint again?
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com


Have you done the same type of trip to the Giro? My first choice but
I've been tainted by France in a previous life(USN).
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
> Have you done the same type of trip to the Giro? My first choice but
> I've been tainted by France in a previous life(USN).


Everyone I know who's done the Giro has had an extraordinary experience.
Much more open than the TdF (easier access to the riders etc). I haven't
been yet, but one of these days. The Stelvio is calling to me!

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"Qui si parla Campagnolo-www.vecchios.com" <[email protected]> wrote in
message news:[email protected]
> On Aug 14, 12:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >> Mike I enjoyed your
>> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
>> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
>> >> could
>> >> have been there.
>> >> Bill

>>
>> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
>> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
>> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
>> > versus
>> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>>
>> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
>> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
>> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we
>> climbed
>> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way
>> to
>> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of
>> the
>> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
>> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any
>> bar
>> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take
>> care
>> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
>> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.
>>
>> So what was your complaint again?
>>
>> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> Have you done the same type of trip to the Giro? My first choice but
> I've been tainted by France in a previous life(USN).
>
 
D

datakoll

Guest
On Aug 13, 2:47 pm, Crescentius Vespasianus <[email protected]>
wrote:
> Bill wrote:
> > Mike I enjoyed your comments.
> >http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> > In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I could
> > have been there.
> > Bill

>
> -----------------
> The only way they could of got me there
> is the same way they got those taliban
> prisoners to Gitmo.


Maybe Mike didn't watch the movie?
 
S

Smokey

Guest
On Aug 14, 1:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> Mike I enjoyed your
> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
> >> could
> >> have been there.
> >> Bill

>
> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
> > versus
> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>
> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we climbed
> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way to
> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of the
> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any bar
> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take care
> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.
>
> So what was your complaint again?
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com


Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?

Smokey
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
> Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
> sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?
>
> Smokey


I've done the TdF gig just about every way possible. This year my son & I
brought over our own bikes. I used my "rain" bike, a Trek 5900, that's been
through the wars and isn't going to mind a few more chips here and there
(unlike my Project One painted Madone 5.9 SSL, which I brought with me last
year and the TSA folk did what they could to try and do a number on it). My
son has a Trek Pilot 2.1 that he's outgrowing and will be moving shortly to
a Trek 5000, but again we figured we were better off leaving the nicer stuff
at home.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"Smokey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Aug 14, 1:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> >> Mike I enjoyed your
>> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
>> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
>> >> could
>> >> have been there.
>> >> Bill

>>
>> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
>> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
>> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
>> > versus
>> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>>
>> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
>> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
>> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we
>> climbed
>> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way
>> to
>> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of
>> the
>> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
>> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any
>> bar
>> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take
>> care
>> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
>> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.
>>
>> So what was your complaint again?
>>
>> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
> sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?
>
> Smokey
>
 
D

datakoll

Guest
On Aug 15, 2:27 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
> > sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?

>
> > Smokey

>
> I've done the TdF gig just about every way possible. This year my son & I
> brought over our own bikes. I used my "rain" bike, a Trek 5900, that's been
> through the wars and isn't going to mind a few more chips here and there
> (unlike my Project One painted Madone 5.9 SSL, which I brought with me last
> year and the TSA folk did what they could to try and do a number on it). My
> son has a Trek Pilot 2.1 that he's outgrowing and will be moving shortly to
> a Trek 5000, but again we figured we were better off leaving the nicer stuff
> at home.
>
> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com
>
> "Smokey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
> news:[email protected]
>
>
>
> > On Aug 14, 1:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> >> Mike I enjoyed your
> >> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> >> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
> >> >> could
> >> >> have been there.
> >> >> Bill

>
> >> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
> >> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
> >> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
> >> > versus
> >> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>
> >> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
> >> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
> >> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we
> >> climbed
> >> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way
> >> to
> >> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of
> >> the
> >> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
> >> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any
> >> bar
> >> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take
> >> care
> >> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
> >> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.

>
> >> So what was your complaint again?

>
> >> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> > Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
> > sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?

>
> > Smokey- Hide quoted text -

>
> - Show quoted text -


how do you keep track of the TdF as you watch or wait?
do you follow an accurate running radio broadcast?
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo-www.vecchios.com

Guest
On Aug 15, 12:33 am, datakoll <[email protected]> wrote:
> On Aug 15, 2:27 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>
>
> > > Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
> > > sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?

>
> > > Smokey

>
> > I've done the TdF gig just about every way possible. This year my son & I
> > brought over our own bikes. I used my "rain" bike, a Trek 5900, that's been
> > through the wars and isn't going to mind a few more chips here and there
> > (unlike my Project One painted Madone 5.9 SSL, which I brought with me last
> > year and the TSA folk did what they could to try and do a number on it). My
> > son has a Trek Pilot 2.1 that he's outgrowing and will be moving shortly to
> > a Trek 5000, but again we figured we were better off leaving the nicer stuff
> > at home.

>
> > --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> > "Smokey" <[email protected]> wrote in message

>
> >news:[email protected]

>
> > > On Aug 14, 1:25 am, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]> wrote:
> > >> >> Mike I enjoyed your
> > >> >> comments.http://www.velonews.com/news/fea/13086.0.html
> > >> >> In spite of all its flaws, the Tour is an incredible spectacle. Wish I
> > >> >> could
> > >> >> have been there.
> > >> >> Bill

>
> > >> > yeah. 100 degree hot wind blowing over plowed fields, days spent
> > >> > getting to and from a mountain infested with drunk germans, bad
> > >> > overpriced food, overflowing...no potable drinking water
> > >> > versus
> > >> > hjgjgd mmff dbwewe...

>
> > >> The temps from the Pyrenees-on were actually quite mild, probably rarely
> > >> above 80F. And, again regarding the Pyrenees, it's a myth that it's
> > >> difficult to get around. We left no earlier than 9am for the days we
> > >> climbed
> > >> the Aubisque and Port de Bales, and had no problem making it all the way
> > >> to
> > >> the top of each climb a fair amount ahead of the caravan (well ahead of
> > >> the
> > >> riders). Food is, for the most part, quite reasonable in France. Not much
> > >> trouble with water either, especially if you're a cyclist. Go into any
> > >> bar
> > >> and ask for "Eeau ordinaire" (tap water) and they'll be happy to take
> > >> care
> > >> of you. That plus just about every village has its own cental drinkable
> > >> water source. Drunk Germans? Primarily in the Alps.

>
> > >> So what was your complaint again?

>
> > >> --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReactionBicycles.com

>
> > > Mike, do you rent your bikes there or take your own ones over? I'm
> > > sure if you take them they're Treks; which model do you use?

>
> > > Smokey- Hide quoted text -

>
> > - Show quoted text -

>
> how do you keep track of the TdF as you watch or wait?
> do you follow an accurate running radio broadcast?


I think it would be great fun to see a one day classic in Italia, like
Milan-San Remo..come a few days early, ride around, then park in a
nice outside bar and watch the race whilst enjoying some local brew or
another..then stay a few more days, ride around then reluctantly go
home. I think the major tours are neat, but the constant travel may
wear on you..unless it is complete;ly supported...and all ya gotta do
is 'ride that way', each morning..with guide and sag wagon. Where is
that $100 tree again??
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
> how do you keep track of the TdF as you watch or wait?
> do you follow an accurate running radio broadcast?


Depends how late in the day it is! If it's past 7:30am PDT, then I can call
my wife on the cellphone, and get it relayed from Versus. And there are
campers all over the place with dish TV setups tuned to the 'Tour as well.
If I could understand Jack-In-The-Box French, then a radio would work... but
I can't.

In any event, there's not as much dead time as you'd think. The Caravan is
designed to deal with that, plus you can always bring a book to read.

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
 
M

Mike Jacoubowsky

Guest
> I think it would be great fun to see a one day classic in Italia, like
> Milan-San Remo..come a few days early, ride around, then park in a
> nice outside bar and watch the race whilst enjoying some local brew or
> another..then stay a few more days, ride around then reluctantly go
> home. I think the major tours are neat, but the constant travel may
> wear on you..unless it is complete;ly supported...and all ya gotta do
> is 'ride that way', each morning..with guide and sag wagon. Where is
> that $100 tree again??


I've done it both ways, and, while certainly less stressful doing the "ride
that way" each morning gig, there's something very satisfying about doing it
entirely on your own (or with your 14 year-old son, as in my case this
year).

We have customers who go to Milan-San Remo each year, and have the time of
their lives.

But getting back to following a major tour and stress levels, do you really
think it can compare to the day-to-day stuff involved in running a retail
bicycle shop? Maybe things are stress-free for businesses in the RoB
(Republic of Boulder), but that's not the case 'round my parts. It's very
satisfying running a business and taking care of customers, but I'd rate 10
days in France as being far less stressful.

--Mike Jacoubowsky
Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReaction.com
Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA
 
Q

Qui si parla Campagnolo-www.vecchios.com

Guest
On Aug 19, 10:44 pm, "Mike Jacoubowsky" <[email protected]>
wrote:
> > I think it would be great fun to see a one day classic in Italia, like
> > Milan-San Remo..come a few days early, ride around, then park in a
> > nice outside bar and watch the race whilst enjoying some local brew or
> > another..then stay a few more days, ride around then reluctantly go
> > home. I think the major tours are neat, but the constant travel may
> > wear on you..unless it is complete;ly supported...and all ya gotta do
> > is 'ride that way', each morning..with guide and sag wagon. Where is
> > that $100 tree again??

>
> I've done it both ways, and, while certainly less stressful doing the "ride
> that way" each morning gig, there's something very satisfying about doing it
> entirely on your own (or with your 14 year-old son, as in my case this
> year).
>
> We have customers who go to Milan-San Remo each year, and have the time of
> their lives.
>
> But getting back to following a major tour and stress levels, do you really
> think it can compare to the day-to-day stuff involved in running a retail
> bicycle shop? Maybe things are stress-free for businesses in the RoB
> (Republic of Boulder), but that's not the case 'round my parts. It's very
> satisfying running a business and taking care of customers, but I'd rate 10
> days in France as being far less stressful.
>
> --Mike Jacoubowsky
> Chain Reaction Bicycleswww.ChainReaction.com
> Redwood City & Los Altos, CA USA


I'd rate 10 days in Italky less stressful..for sure. I'm going to the
World's in 2008..Been to Italy many times and it's never stressful.
Once for a week in France, very stressful..no thanks, never again.
 

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