Mile-long swimming pool ... and other questions

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Scott T. Jensen, Sep 13, 2003.

  1. I'm simply toying with an idea ... at this stage ... and would appreciate answers to the questions
    that follow it.

    IDEA: A private school that has a mile-long swimming pool to its cafeteria and theater. Students
    would be required to swim it for each of their meals and for movies, plays, concerts, etc. The idea
    is to have these daily swims to promote physical fitness. This pool would only be for distance
    swimming and not accommodate diving and such water activities.

    QUESTIONS: Has a mile-long temperature-controlled swimming pool ever been built? What's the longest
    swimming pool ever built?

    Has a floating temperature-controlled swimming pool ever been built? Say the school was on two
    islands and the dormitories were on one island and the cafeteria and movie theater (and some other
    buildings) where on a neighboring island. OR the cafeteria/etc. was on one side of a lake and the
    dorms on another. Could a floating swimming pool be extended between them? My concern would be them
    swimming in the open sea and exposed to parasites ... as well as jellyfish, sharks, and other
    not-too-friendly things of the sea. Even lakes have a parasite problems, as is the case with Devil's
    Lake in Wisconsin. And by temperature controlling such a pool, it could be located in almost any
    temperature climate and not simply restricted to a tropical region.

    Saying there was a student body of a thousand students, how many lanes would the pool need?
    Naturally, not all the students start the swim at the same time and would be staggered.

    How long does it take a person to normally swim a mile?

    When I grew up, I was told never to swim right after eating. Is there some truth to this or is this
    an old wives' tale? In other words, would it be OK to have the students swim back after their meals?

    Could the swimming pool have its own current? "Endless Pools"
    (http://www.endlesspools.com/index.html) has designed such types of pools ... though far smaller and
    for just one or two swimmers. Could or has an extended version of this ever been done? By having two
    major lanes (one going one way and the other the other), the water flow could simply be looped. The
    idea being to reduce the length of the pool by having students swim against a current. Their
    progress would be slower but they'd get the equivalent of a mile's swim and the pool could then be
    much shorter. This would also prevent the students from swimming at a leisurely pace as the current
    would simply push them back to the start line. And, yes, I'm emailing Endless Pools this question,
    but I'd appreciate answers that might not have a financial stake in their answers. :)

    Thanks for helping me explore this idea!

    Scott Jensen
    --
    Like a cure for A.I.D.S, Alzheimer, Parkinson, & Mad Cow Disease? Volunteer your computer for
    folding-protein research for when it's idle. Go to http://www.distributedfolding.org/ to sign up
    your computer.
     
    Tags:


  2. Donal Fagan

    Donal Fagan Guest

    On Wed, 23 Apr 2003 16:30:10 -0500, "Scott T. Jensen" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >IDEA: A private school that has a mile-long swimming pool to its cafeteria and theater. Students
    >would be required to swim it for each of their meals and for movies, plays, concerts, etc. The idea
    >is to have these daily swims to promote physical fitness. This pool would only be for distance
    >swimming and not accommodate diving and such water activities.

    1760 yards. You'd need a lot of lifeguards and pool vacuums.

    >QUESTIONS: Has a mile-long temperature-controlled swimming pool ever been built?

    Found these, but they're marketing, so might be ... exaggerated:

    "Need to get away from it all? Here's the place! The Mayan Palace in Acapulco is an RCI Gold Crown
    Resort complete with 18-hole golf course, mile-long pool, 3 restaurants, and all the beauty you
    can handle. "

    "Nuevo Vallarta: Almost 1 million m2 with a 1.5 km. Beach, in the best location only 5 minutes from
    the airport. Our wonderful golf course specially designed to merge into nature, inner lake, tennis
    courts, a navigation channel to explore our facilities. A fabulous interactive swimming pool which
    has the largest surface in the world. Deluxe suites perfectly equipped for your comfort"

    >Has a floating temperature-controlled swimming pool ever been built? Say the school was on two
    >islands and the dormitories were on one island and the cafeteria and movie theater (and some other
    >buildings) where on a neighboring island. OR the cafeteria/etc. was on one side of a lake and the
    >dorms on another. Could a floating swimming pool be extended between them? My concern would be them
    >swimming in the open sea and exposed to parasites ... as well as jellyfish, sharks, and other
    >not-too-friendly things of the sea. Even lakes have a parasite problems, as is the case with
    >Devil's Lake in Wisconsin. And by temperature controlling such a pool, it could be located in
    >almost any temperature climate and not simply restricted to a tropical region.

    Have you been taking No-Doz?

    >Saying there was a student body of a thousand students, how many lanes would the pool need?
    >Naturally, not all the students start the swim at the same time and would be staggered.
    >
    >How long does it take a person to normally swim a mile?
    >
    >When I grew up, I was told never to swim right after eating. Is there some truth to this or is
    >this an old wives' tale? In other words, would it be OK to have the students swim back after
    >their meals?
    >
    >Could the swimming pool have its own current? "Endless Pools"
    >(http://www.endlesspools.com/index.html) has designed such types of pools ... though far smaller
    >and for just one or two swimmers. Could or has an extended version of this ever been done? By
    >having two major lanes (one going one way and the other the other), the water flow could simply be
    >looped. The idea being to reduce the length of the pool by having students swim against a current.
    >Their progress would be slower but they'd get the equivalent of a mile's swim and the pool could
    >then be much shorter. This would also prevent the students from swimming at a leisurely pace as the
    >current would simply push them back to the start line. And, yes, I'm emailing Endless Pools this
    >question, but I'd appreciate answers that might not have a financial stake in their answers. :)
    >
    >Thanks for helping me explore this idea!
    >
    >Scott Jensen

    Donal Fagan AIA [email protected]'Fagan.com (Anglicise the name to reply by e-mail)
     
  3. This is a solution in desparate need of a problem. Nothing about it is impossible other than the
    fact that money could be better spent doing just about anything else. Your dangers of parasites,
    jellies, and sharks is grossly overstated.

    A shallow man made lake would be relatively warm and easy to build, but algae and critters would
    come along. Chlorinating that much water is non trivial.

    If you want to make students swim for dinner, take your 50m pool and make them do a circuit up and
    down the lanes. You could get at least 800m on a one way path. Just have your school nurse ready for
    the numerous overuse injuries.
    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
  4. "Scott T. Jensen" wrote:
    >
    > I'm simply toying with an idea ... at this stage ... and would appreciate answers to the questions
    > that follow it.
    >
    > IDEA: A private school that has a mile-long swimming pool to its cafeteria and theater. Students
    > would be required to swim it for each of their meals and for movies, plays, concerts, etc. The
    > idea is to have these daily swims to promote physical fitness. This pool would only be for
    > distance swimming and not accommodate diving and such water activities.
    >
    > QUESTIONS: Has a mile-long temperature-controlled swimming pool ever been built? What's the
    > longest swimming pool ever built?

    I don't know, but you would need a lifeguard every 25 meters, or every 50 meters at most, which
    means at least thiry lifeguards. You would also need a mile long place to put the pool and it would
    have to be enclosed in most locations. The cost of the pool would be much higher because its walls
    and bottom would be two miles long, which would make its filtration system more costly as well.
    Unless you built the pool to be wide, only a few people could start at a time. If it was a one lane
    pool, only two people could start at a time. If it takes 10 seconds for each pair to get in and
    start, then in an AAA high school with 2000 kids, it would take about three hours to get everyone
    started. Your average high school couch potato might not finish the 1500 at all, but wouldn't do it
    in less than 40 minutes anyway. This would create a lot of frustration for faster swimmers trying
    to "play through" and getting elbowed and sloshed trying to swim through the inevitable logboom
    traffic jams.

    I think I would implement this concept with several different activies happening simultaneously,
    with each student participating in one activity only each day and rotating on a weekly basis. Then
    you could use the existing pool, plus the track, the basketball courts, the aerobics floor, etc.

    martin

    --
    Martin Smith email: [email protected] Vollsveien 9 tel. : +47 6783 1188
    P.O. Box 482 mob. : +47 932 48 303 1327 Lysaker, Norway
     
  5. "Jason O'Rourke" wrote:
    > Just have your school nurse ready for the numerous overuse injuries.

    Please explain. I didn't know one could be injured by regular swimming.

    Scott Jensen
    --
    Got a business problem or question? Like to start a business? You can explore those problems,
    questions, and dreams in misc.business.consulting, misc.business.marketing.moderated
    misc.business.moderated, and misc.entrepreneurs.moderated
     
  6. Scott T. Jensen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Just have your school nurse ready for the numerous overuse injuries.
    >
    >Please explain. I didn't know one could be injured by regular swimming.

    You suggested the kids swim a mile for each meal. If that's not a recipe for trouble, what is?

    One can be injured by too much of any regular exercise. Junk mileage is not beneficial.

    --
    Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
     
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