Mileage

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by cyclintom, Oct 31, 2018.

  1. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    It must really be sad to have had such an empty life that you can only cry yourself to sleep at night and close your mind to the fact that others have actually done something with their lives. I pity you.
     


  2. CAMPYBOB

    CAMPYBOB Well-Known Member

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    I pity pathological liars. I pity morons. I pity the fool!

    Damn! I hit the trifecta of pity! LMFAO!

    [​IMG]
     
  3. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Well, I was referred to an Interview and the guy appeared to say that he lost 42 lbs in six months. That's a LOT. I quoted from it - although he was using that video game and exercycle he lost weight as I said, with dieting.

    Then a couple of comments down is CampyBob's comments about his idea of a champion that was almost 3 minutes down on the leader apparently because his ceramic bearings made him so fast.

    Perhaps we are living on different planets since I'm looking at the stuff Campy Bob is posting and apparently you've missed it. It was just on the previous page.
     
  4. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Ok, that is not Jean Nuttli. He is Swiss and was able to get enough people to sponsor him to be able to train on a stationary bike 6-8 hours a day. He was not a athlete previously but became a great TT champion. Was the Swiss national in 2001 and did well on many races. Did all his pre-champ training on a stationary bike. It is about commitment not equipment. Pretty sure Bob knows who I was posting about since I mentioned him by name previously
    I agree that we exist in different realms.
     
  5. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Well - no.
    Combined with a normal lifestyle, perhaps.
    And darn hard anyhow.
    But impossible as such - no.
    I used to do MTB credit card touring in the Alps, and would drop 300-450 grams/day during those tours.
    Longest one I think was 17 days of riding.
    We had a couple of different brands of HRMs, and they routinely logged 8000+ calories burned during each day.
    It wasn't all good, as an obvious bit of that was muscle.
    We all noticed that we went for easier gears a lot earlier in the climbs as the days went by.
     
  6. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    OK, I looked all of this up. I cannot find anything biographical about Jean Nuttli but I will say this - his records were set a decade and a half before Zwift was invented. So I have to wonder since what the numbers appear to be saying is that he was 22 or 23 when he supposedly wasn't an athlete, but was greatly overweight which is unusual among Swiss and he had to be a natural athlete to begin with regardless of any excess weight. Using a trainer in Switzerland which has famously long and hard winters I would think that he would have been trapped on a trainer most of the year to begin with. My wife is of Irish and Swiss heritage and we went there during the fifth win that Lance made. Even in mid-July there was snow on the ground.
     
  7. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Says who?
    I’ve been there, summer and winters. And the neighboring countries. Never heard anything about ”famously long and hard winters”.
    A quick look at a map, the latitude Switzerland is on, ought to be enough to cast serious doubt on such a statement.
    Sure, they do tend to get a fair bit of snow high in the mountains. And it does take awhile for it all to melt off. But spring comes around and thaws out the more populated areas pretty quick. In July, the valleys and lowlands will have had summer road conditions since March/April.
    Now, what Switzerland does have is plenty of altitude.
    Go high enough and you can find patches of snow, particularly on North facing slopes long into the summer.
    As you can in France, Italy, Spain and Austria - only to mention a few. As for snow on the ground in July being a common, widespread occurrence - no.
    Plain no.
    The orchards and vineyards in the valleys are in full swing, yachting season in Lake Geneva is well underway.
    Anywhere off the mountains it’s full summer.
     
  8. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Quote from here:https://m.myswitzerland.com/en-se/climate.html

    ”From July to August the daytime temperature range is 18 to 28 °C (65° - 82° F) and from January to February the range is -2 to 7 °C (28° - 45° F). In spring and autumn, the daytime temperature range is 8 to 15 °C (46° - 59° F).

    You’d have to be quite pampered by a warm climate to be intimidated by that winter.
     
  9. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    Let me put this in detailed
    Well, you're wrong.
     
  10. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Come on, you have to be more informative than that.
     
  11. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    When I was there in July in what, 1998 or 1999, my wife and I took a train from Paris to somewhere or other in Switzerland and there was snow on the peaks. That was after the end of the Tour at the end of July.

    Looking at the climate reports to see if there's been any changes they say that there has been so little deviation of the normal that it isn't worthy of discussion. 0.12 degrees C.
     
  12. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    This is a prime example of the kind of writing that gets you in trouble.
    First you write about ”famously long and hard winters”, ”trapped on a trainer most of the year” and ”snow on the ground”.

    And now it’s ”snow on the peaks”.
    Now, ”snow on the ground” in July, that does sound somewhat special.
    ”Snow on the peaks” in the Alps - well, any high-altitude mountainous region, that’s NORMAL.
    But hardly an influence on everyday life. For most people ”everyday life” happens at lower altitudes where neither winter nor the amount of snow on the roads is much to brag or moan about.
     
  13. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    I was under the impression that you lived in California. There is NO snow on the Sierra Nevada up to 3,000 meters and higher except in a very exceptional year. Seven degrees C would be considered very cold here from 1,000 meters all the way down to sea level. If you see that as anything else than a hard winter one has to wonder if you spent a lot of tike above the Arctic circle.
     
  14. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    Then your impressions have led you wrong.
    QUOTE="cyclintom, post: 3845197, member: 224138"]Seven degrees C would be considered very cold here [/QUOTE]
    So does that mean that your ”famously long and hard winters” statement was to be read with an unwritten ”compared to California”?
    QUOTE="cyclintom, post: 3845197, member: 224138"] If you see that as anything else than a hard winter one has to wonder if you spent a lot of time above the Arctic circle.[/QUOTE]
    If you think one has to go North of the arctic circle to see winters as cold or colder than that, one has to wonder how much you’ve travelled.
    Actually above - not much, but close, yeah.
    On a site open for all nations, its unwise to post weather or climate commentary based on YOUR references unless you either say so or it’s entirely obvious from the context.
    With the engineering background you so often mention, you should know how important it is to provide a baseline, a generally agreed reference for any descriptive statement.
    Comparing weather in one spot to other places at similar latitude, altitude and distance to coast is generally far more useful than using yourself as a reference.
    It’s a big world, and a wide open forum. Weather that’ll chase one rider indoors is well within another’s average riding conditions.
     
  15. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    So does that mean that your ”famously long and hard winters” statement was to be read with an unwritten ”compared to California”?
    QUOTE="cyclintom, post: 3845197, member: 224138"] If you see that as anything else than a hard winter one has to wonder if you spent a lot of time above the Arctic circle.[/QUOTE]
    If you think one has to go North of the arctic circle to see winters as cold or colder than that, one has to wonder how much you’ve travelled.
    Actually above - not much, but close, yeah.
    On a site open for all nations, its unwise to post weather or climate commentary based on YOUR references unless you either say so or it’s entirely obvious from the context.
    With the engineering background you so often mention, you should know how important it is to provide a baseline, a generally agreed reference for any descriptive statement.
    Comparing weather in one spot to other places at similar latitude, altitude and distance to coast is generally far more useful than using yourself as a reference.
    It’s a big world, and a wide open forum. Weather that’ll chase one rider indoors is well within another’s average riding conditions.[/QUOTE]

    You sort of got that quoting incorrect single you have to enclose them with brackets. So doing my best to be as accurate as I can:

    The latitude of Switzerland is about the same as Moses Lake, Washington (state). That means that the entire state of California is below about latitude 38 degrees north while Switzerland is about 48?. So even Switzerland's summers are cold in comparison. Their winters compare to the Sierra Nevada mountains above 2,000 meters in the winter time. So yes - most Americans would consider Switzerland to be cold even in the locations here where we have very bad winters. And especially Californians. We could hardly say that Switzerland is a moderate climate. And in the summer there is no snow at all on the Sierra Nevadas except the very highest peaks in particularly cold years.

    As I said, it was either late July or early August when I visited and all of the peaks had snow on them. Since this only happens in California on rare occasions I would consider the difference in climate between California and Switzerland to be significant.

    If the fall, winter and early spring could be called riding weather by you, then why have indoor trainers at all. Especially since the subject was a man who was riding these things for 8 and 9 hours a day?

    All of this is not to make the slightest complaint about Switzerland. The Swiss seem very pleased with their country. We were speaking about how a 22 year old in Switzerland could be that overweight and the claim that he reduced his weight with exercise which doesn't actually work. Weight reductions in the manner are usually replaced with only slightly lighter muscle mass. The only real method of weight reductions is with diet changes.

    Now we understand that hard exercise does lead to voluntary diet changes and perhaps that was what really spurred this on. But I've had long tours and hard rides like the 200 miles in one day Seattle to Portland and lost nothing more than water weight.

    In any case I am extremely reluctant to assert that he lost all of this weight and became a world TT champion simply because he rode a trainer. I have designed many medical machines and so have a passing interest in physiology and it screams no go.
     
  16. jhuskey

    jhuskey Moderator

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    I have heard enough from Tom. Sensible debate is fine but this has been far from sensible for quite some time.
     
    limerickman likes this.
  17. dabac

    dabac Well-Known Member

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    You expect CampyBob to let YOU slide on an approximation you got wrong, and yet you take the time to get that little bit of sniping in over a bracket that fell off in a copy/paste error?

    And yet you wonder why your threads derail into abuse and name calling....

    And in your usual style you won't comment on the difference between "snow on the ground" and "snow on the peaks".


    Guess what, I'm not going to be that cartoon guy in this thread either.
    So I'll leave you to state your opinions as facts to your heart's content.
     
  18. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    Sniping? I was only informing you why your posting didn't look right when you posted it. I could understand it fine.

    And no CampyBob's WAY over the top reaction to an approximation was not either correct or even showed a passing recognition of sanity.

    So what you are saying is that the peaks are not ground? Or are you going to differentiate at exactly what altitude ground stops and peak starts?

    I think that you ought to stop for a moment and think about that.
     
  19. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    I'm locking this thread.

    I'm editing this thread also.

    I have issued final warnings to Cyclingtom and Froze as regards the contents of the posts and their interaction with other posters here.
     
  20. limerickman

    limerickman Moderator

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    I have unlocked this thread having edited/deleted several posts from posters Cyclingtom, Froze and Campybob.

    The bickering between the three of you ends now.

    If I see any posts from any of you seeking to insult/provoke other posters on this site, I will permanently delete your user accounts and delete all your posts.


     
  21. cyclintom

    cyclintom Well-Known Member

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    I have started many threads here in order to get away from those two who have chased me from thread to thread. Do you expect me to not respond to continuous harassment? While I would prefer to keep these threads on-subject what am I supposed to do when we have someone subjecting me to insults for saying that I have used cheap Chinese carbon wheels and got very good performance out of them and a great deal of bang for buck, but that the tubeless versions suffer from delamination? Do YOU think that this is useful information? I am an engineer and explain that ceramic bearing do not add enough efficiency to be worth buying for that reason alone. Do you think that is useful for most of those on the forum? Why should I be insulted continuously .....(edited by Limerickman).

    I understand that you have a lot of things that you are responsible for and you shouldn't have to police a damn forum. And that this constant bickering is bad for the forum. But I also expect you to see where it is originating.
     
    #100 cyclintom, Dec 20, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 20, 2018
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