Mince pie for Wayne

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Kathy in NZ, Apr 5, 2006.

  1. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    Wayne

    Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.

    Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    moulds, oval in shape).

    1 lb mince (ground beef)
    water
    salt
    pepper
    worcestershire sauce (optional)
    dried beef stock powder (optional)

    In a pot, add a little oil, heat, and add mince. Brown, breaking up
    any lumps.
    Add enough water to cover the meat, but don't add too little. The
    water will become the gravy.
    Add 1 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, a good dash of worcestershire
    sauce (if desired). I would add a teaspoon of dried beef stock.
    Simmer 30 minutes
    Thicken with a slurry of flour and water (you don't want it runny).
    Simmer a little longer for flour to absorb.

    Using flaky pastry, roll out, and using a pie mould, cut the bases
    large enough to overlap when put in the tins. Cut tops the same way,
    making them smaller. Grease pie tins and place a base in each tin.
    Fill with the cooked mince, top with a pastry lid and seal the edges.
    Brush with beaten egg (if desired for glaze. It's cosmetic only).
    Using end of sharp knife, make one or two steam openings in the lid.
    Bake at about 350F for about 30 minutes (relying on memory here, so it
    might be longer), or till pastry is cooked through.

    Note: Don't roll the bases too thin. A pie is traditionally eaten in
    the hand, so you don't want it to fall to pieces or sag.

    That's my recipe for a mince pie. As you can see, it hasn't many
    ingredients. It's really just mince and seasonings. But there are many
    variations on that theme and many different types of pies. I like
    "chicken and mushroom" pies too. Most stews or casseroles that use
    boneless meat and which don't have large chunky veges can be used as
    fillings for pies. And of course, instead of individual pies, you can
    make a large pie for the family. It should be a shallow pie, not a
    deep one.

    Kathy in NZ
     
    Tags:


  2. On Wed 05 Apr 2006 05:06:13a, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it Kathy in
    NZ?

    > Wayne
    >
    > Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    > to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    > in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.
    >
    > Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    > moulds, oval in shape).
    >
    > 1 lb mince (ground beef)
    > water
    > salt
    > pepper
    > worcestershire sauce (optional)
    > dried beef stock powder (optional)
    >
    > In a pot, add a little oil, heat, and add mince. Brown, breaking up
    > any lumps.
    > Add enough water to cover the meat, but don't add too little. The
    > water will become the gravy.
    > Add 1 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, a good dash of worcestershire
    > sauce (if desired). I would add a teaspoon of dried beef stock.
    > Simmer 30 minutes
    > Thicken with a slurry of flour and water (you don't want it runny).
    > Simmer a little longer for flour to absorb.
    >
    > Using flaky pastry, roll out, and using a pie mould, cut the bases
    > large enough to overlap when put in the tins. Cut tops the same way,
    > making them smaller. Grease pie tins and place a base in each tin.
    > Fill with the cooked mince, top with a pastry lid and seal the edges.
    > Brush with beaten egg (if desired for glaze. It's cosmetic only).
    > Using end of sharp knife, make one or two steam openings in the lid.
    > Bake at about 350F for about 30 minutes (relying on memory here, so it
    > might be longer), or till pastry is cooked through.
    >
    > Note: Don't roll the bases too thin. A pie is traditionally eaten in
    > the hand, so you don't want it to fall to pieces or sag.
    >
    > That's my recipe for a mince pie. As you can see, it hasn't many
    > ingredients. It's really just mince and seasonings. But there are many
    > variations on that theme and many different types of pies. I like
    > "chicken and mushroom" pies too. Most stews or casseroles that use
    > boneless meat and which don't have large chunky veges can be used as
    > fillings for pies. And of course, instead of individual pies, you can
    > make a large pie for the family. It should be a shallow pie, not a
    > deep one.


    Thank you, Kathy! This sounds perfect. David loves mince in almost
    anything, but doesn't like a lot of other ingredients. This is just the
    ticket!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  3. Phred

    Phred Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:
    >Wayne
    >
    >Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    >to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    >in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.


    They've just banned meat pies and other "junk food" at all government
    schools (or only primary schools?) in Qld. Some items will be allowed
    once or twice a year on special occasions at a school.

    This bloody Labor mob is gradually going right overboard in
    legislating to run people's lives for them. It won't be long before
    we all have to use only Premier Pete's Pink Poop Paper.

    ObFood: An Aussie Meat Pie
    <Stolen from http://www.abc.net.au/westernplains/stories/s1151505.htm>

    Meat Pie -- Chef: Yolanda Torrisi

    (kid-friendly style)

    Degree of difficulty: Low

    You need:
    1 onion, chopped
    2 tablespoons oil
    1 kg good quality mince (use premium or lean mince rather than
    hamburger mince as it will have less fat)
    500 grams frozen mixed vegetables (try the carrot, corn, peas and bean
    mix or if your kids aren’t keen on beans, then try the carrot, corn,
    peas and potato mix)
    1/2 cup tomato sauce
    1/4 cup worcestershire sauce
    2 tablespoons cornflour
    1/4 cup water
    2 sheets of puff pastry

    Method:
    Using a large saucepan, saute the onion in oil on a medium heat until
    it looks translucent.

    Add the mince and brown it all over.

    Add the frozen vegetables, tomato sauce and worcestershire sauce and
    cook for 30 minutes on a low heat, stirring occasionally to ensure the
    meat does not stick to the bottom of the saucepan.

    Mix the cornflour and water and mix until all the cornflour is
    dissolved. Add to the meat at the end of the meat’s cooking time. Stir
    thoroughly.

    Divide the meat filling into 6 small ovenproof bowls or if you don’t
    have individual small bowls, place the meat filling into a casserole
    dish.

    If you are using the small bowls, cut the pastry into four quarters,
    so you have four equal square pieces of pastry from each sheet of puff
    pastry. Lay over the top of each bowl and pinch the edges of the
    pastry to sit in an even circle around the top lip of the bowl so it
    seals the pie. Note these pies do not have any pastry as the bottom. I
    find, the pastry goes too soggy and you really don’t need pastry at
    the bottom of the bowls (much healthier).

    If you’re only using one large casserole dish for your pie, then you
    will only need one sheet of pastry. Lay it over the top and pinch in
    the edges to seal the pie.
    <End larceny>

    Chef Yolanda Torrisi neglects to suggest a use for the surplus half
    sheet of puff pastry. Do all you cooks do this sort of thing? ;-)

    Cheers, Phred.

    --
    [email protected]LID
     
  4. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    "Kathy in NZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Wayne
    >
    > Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    > to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    > in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.
    >
    > Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    > moulds, oval in shape).
    >
    > 1 lb mince (ground beef)
    > water
    > salt
    > pepper
    > worcestershire sauce (optional)
    > dried beef stock powder (optional)
    >
    >> Kathy in NZ


    Just curious -- is calling ground beef "mince" the origin of "mincemeat"?
    Seems logical -- if so, what is the term for "mincemeat" in your form of
    English? If I called pie "mince" in the USA it would probably be taken for
    meaning "mincemeat pie", the sweet dessert made with ground meat.

    I'll bet that out of the confusion someone once said "to hell with it, let's
    just call it hamburger" and it stuck :)
    --
    Lefty

    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful


    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  5. Nancy1

    Nancy1 Guest

    Lefty wrote:
    > "Kathy in NZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    > > Wayne
    > >
    > > Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    > > to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    > > in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.
    > >
    > > Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    > > moulds, oval in shape).
    > >
    > > 1 lb mince (ground beef)
    > > water
    > > salt
    > > pepper
    > > worcestershire sauce (optional)
    > > dried beef stock powder (optional)
    > >
    > >> Kathy in NZ

    >
    > Just curious -- is calling ground beef "mince" the origin of "mincemeat"?


    I'd venture a good guess that mincemeat (meaning, minced meat) predates
    ground beef. Originally, the beef was just cut or pulled into tiny
    bits - minced. My grandmother (German descent) always made mincemeat
    pie with real beef instead of what is called mincemeat in the US today.
    She did NOT use ground beef, but rather cooked the beef and then cut
    it up. However, I never liked it as much as a US version of mincemeat
    that used apples and other sweet stuff as a dessert pie filling. ;-)


    N.
     
  6. fudge

    fudge Guest

    The pies I et in the Whangamatta area of the North Island had a lot of fat,
    sinew and grissle in them. They were edible but not the best cuts of the cow
    were used. They tasted a bit bland. That recipe of yours sounds good but I
    would add some peas and maybe some carrots. Perhaps commercial pies are a
    way of using up all the leftover chunks of the cow.

    f.j.

    "Kathy in NZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Wayne
    >
    > Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    > to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    > in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.
    >
    > Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    > moulds, oval in shape).
    >
    > 1 lb mince (ground beef)
    > water
    > salt
    > pepper
    > worcestershire sauce (optional)
    > dried beef stock powder (optional)
    >
    > In a pot, add a little oil, heat, and add mince. Brown, breaking up
    > any lumps.
    > Add enough water to cover the meat, but don't add too little. The
    > water will become the gravy.
    > Add 1 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, a good dash of worcestershire
    > sauce (if desired). I would add a teaspoon of dried beef stock.
    > Simmer 30 minutes
    > Thicken with a slurry of flour and water (you don't want it runny).
    > Simmer a little longer for flour to absorb.
    >
    > Using flaky pastry, roll out, and using a pie mould, cut the bases
    > large enough to overlap when put in the tins. Cut tops the same way,
    > making them smaller. Grease pie tins and place a base in each tin.
    > Fill with the cooked mince, top with a pastry lid and seal the edges.
    > Brush with beaten egg (if desired for glaze. It's cosmetic only).
    > Using end of sharp knife, make one or two steam openings in the lid.
    > Bake at about 350F for about 30 minutes (relying on memory here, so it
    > might be longer), or till pastry is cooked through.
    >
    > Note: Don't roll the bases too thin. A pie is traditionally eaten in
    > the hand, so you don't want it to fall to pieces or sag.
    >
    > That's my recipe for a mince pie. As you can see, it hasn't many
    > ingredients. It's really just mince and seasonings. But there are many
    > variations on that theme and many different types of pies. I like
    > "chicken and mushroom" pies too. Most stews or casseroles that use
    > boneless meat and which don't have large chunky veges can be used as
    > fillings for pies. And of course, instead of individual pies, you can
    > make a large pie for the family. It should be a shallow pie, not a
    > deep one.
    >
    > Kathy in NZ
    >
    >
    >
    >
     
  7. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    Speaking as an ex-Brit and now Aussie, pies are almost a staple here.
    As Kathy said, there are many variations on the theme.

    * When making the pie, use pie crust for the bottom, then filling, and
    as an alternative top with mashed potato (Cottage Pie) then bake until
    golden brown.

    * We/I actually prefer using cubed steak rather than mince - makes for
    a much 'meatier' end result. When I've had leftover Beef Burgundy I've
    used it as a pie filler. Really, really nice!

    * Brits LOVE mushy peas - some pie fillings can be topped with a layer
    of mushy peas (cooked & pulverised in a blitzer) then topped with pie
    crust.

    I find that a shortcrust pastry works well too and if making a large
    pie, the pastry doesn't suffer from being refrigerated/frozen.

    The worst thing I've heard of is the Pie Floater - which I believe
    originated in South Australia. It's essentially a shallow bowl half
    filled with tomato sauce (ketchup) and the pie is placed face down into
    it. Salt content must be horrendous!!
    (Admits to preferring sauce WITH my pie, rather than pie WITH my
    sauce!!)

    cheers,

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  8. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    I believe it's only our primary (grade) schools Phred.
    There would be hell to pay in the high schools if they tried it -
    believe me!

    Can well remember when my kids left primary (yes, our tuckshop was the
    first model for the Healthy Tuckshop - complete with kangaroo burgers
    -low cholesterol!) and went to high school.
    They couldn't believe the quantity and variety of junk food on offer to
    them. Particularly at girl's schools - where (once a month) hormones
    kick in and the obvious and dire need to massive doses of chocolate in
    all it's glorious forms, is a major part of the girls' daily intake!!

    High schools even have softdrink vending machines strategically placed
    around the schools - clever marketing from Coke I thought!

    So rest assured, the kids are in no immediate danger of losing their
    ability to eat poorly and make bad dietary choices.

    hehehe

    LadyJane (also in Queensland)
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  9. On Wed 05 Apr 2006 02:34:23p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it LadyJane?

    > Speaking as an ex-Brit and now Aussie, pies are almost a staple here.
    > As Kathy said, there are many variations on the theme.
    >
    > * When making the pie, use pie crust for the bottom, then filling, and
    > as an alternative top with mashed potato (Cottage Pie) then bake until
    > golden brown.
    >
    > * We/I actually prefer using cubed steak rather than mince - makes for
    > a much 'meatier' end result. When I've had leftover Beef Burgundy I've
    > used it as a pie filler. Really, really nice!
    >
    > * Brits LOVE mushy peas - some pie fillings can be topped with a layer
    > of mushy peas (cooked & pulverised in a blitzer) then topped with pie
    > crust.
    >
    > I find that a shortcrust pastry works well too and if making a large
    > pie, the pastry doesn't suffer from being refrigerated/frozen.
    >
    > The worst thing I've heard of is the Pie Floater - which I believe
    > originated in South Australia. It's essentially a shallow bowl half
    > filled with tomato sauce (ketchup) and the pie is placed face down into
    > it. Salt content must be horrendous!!
    > (Admits to preferring sauce WITH my pie, rather than pie WITH my
    > sauce!!)
    >
    > cheers,
    >
    > LadyJane


    Some nice and interesting options. I'v never had mushy peas. Don't think
    they'd be easy to find here. I have to agree, the Pie Floater sounds
    dreadful!


    --
    Wayne Boatwright Õ¿Õ¬
    ________________________________________

    Okay, okay, I take it back! UnScrew you!
     
  10. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    Wayne I think the mushy peas is just tinned peas blitzed. Probably a
    little of the canning liquid blitzed in too, so the mixture is gloopy..
    Never made them myself either... however, after discussing disgusting
    pie anecdotes with my husband Graeme (of 29 years) I discovered last
    weekend that he apparently LIKES pies and mushy peas. Go figure!
    Who says after 29 years you know all there is to know about your
    partner???

    Think he'll be eating the peas solo though. <wink>

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  11. sf

    sf Guest

    On 5 Apr 2006 14:34:23 -0700, LadyJane wrote:

    > * Brits LOVE mushy peas - some pie fillings can be topped with a layer
    > of mushy peas (cooked & pulverised in a blitzer) then topped with pie
    > crust.


    Are those fresh peas or split peas?
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  12. sf

    sf Guest

    On 5 Apr 2006 15:12:49 -0700, LadyJane wrote:

    > however, after discussing disgusting
    > pie anecdotes with my husband Graeme (of 29 years) I discovered last
    > weekend that he apparently LIKES pies and mushy peas. Go figure!
    > Who says after 29 years you know all there is to know about your
    > partner???


    Graeme? Does your husband fequent another food related ng?
    --

    Practice safe eating. Always use condiments.
     
  13. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    I WISH!!

    Last time he ventured into the kitchen (to cook something) was about 13
    years ago!!

    ROFLMAO

    "FOOD" mysteriously arrives on his plate from some nether region....
    thankfully he DOES know where the dishwasher is situated (and no, it
    doesn't have 2 legs!)

    <nudge, nudge, wink wink>

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  14. LadyJane wrote:

    > * Brits LOVE mushy peas - some pie fillings can be topped with a layer
    > of mushy peas (cooked & pulverised in a blitzer) then topped with pie
    > crust.


    Hey, wait a minute! Where were you when I said something about adding mushy
    peas to Beef Wellington to make it "more British," and nobody knew what I
    was talking about?

    Bob
     
  15. LadyJane

    LadyJane Guest

    Cooked, canned variety - have a very unique taste - can well remember
    them as main ingredient in cafeteria food in the 60s & 70s... ugghh.

    Ok if you are castaway on an island, or stuck in cyclone conditions...
    but not my favourite veg from a can.

    cheers,

    LadyJane
    --
    "Never trust a skinny cook!"
     
  16. Lefty

    Lefty Guest

    > >
    > > Just curious -- is calling ground beef "mince" the origin of

    "mincemeat"?
    >
    > I'd venture a good guess that mincemeat (meaning, minced meat) predates
    > ground beef. Originally, the beef was just cut or pulled into tiny
    > bits - minced. My grandmother (German descent) always made mincemeat
    > pie with real beef instead of what is called mincemeat in the US today.
    > She did NOT use ground beef, but rather cooked the beef and then cut
    > it up. However, I never liked it as much as a US version of mincemeat
    > that used apples and other sweet stuff as a dessert pie filling. ;-)
    >
    >
    > N.


    I have a dynamite recipe for the beef & apples kind you like. It costs a
    mint to buy it in a jar and nowhere near as good as my old timey recipe.

    I will post it if you want it.
    --
    Lefty

    Life is for learning
    The worst I ever had was wonderful
     
  17. On Wed 05 Apr 2006 03:12:49p, Thus Spake Zarathustra, or was it LadyJane?

    > Wayne I think the mushy peas is just tinned peas blitzed. Probably a
    > little of the canning liquid blitzed in too, so the mixture is gloopy..
    > Never made them myself either... however, after discussing disgusting
    > pie anecdotes with my husband Graeme (of 29 years) I discovered last
    > weekend that he apparently LIKES pies and mushy peas. Go figure!
    > Who says after 29 years you know all there is to know about your
    > partner???
    >
    > Think he'll be eating the peas solo though. <wink>


    LOL! I'm with you. David does like tinned peas, whereas I don't. He might
    light them mushed up a bit. I'll have to propose that to him. :)


    --
    Wayne Boatwright @¿@¬
    _____________________
     
  18. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    I particularly hate peas and carrots in pies, but that's just me.
    Often commercial pies do use those veges. If I added any veges to a
    mince pie it would be onions only. For a chicken pie I'd add mushroom,
    and perhaps onions.

    Kathy in NZ

    On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 14:35:04 -0400, "fudge" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >The pies I et in the Whangamatta area of the North Island had a lot of fat,
    >sinew and grissle in them. They were edible but not the best cuts of the cow
    >were used. They tasted a bit bland. That recipe of yours sounds good but I
    >would add some peas and maybe some carrots. Perhaps commercial pies are a
    >way of using up all the leftover chunks of the cow.
    >
    >f.j.
    >
    >"Kathy in NZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Wayne
    >>
    >> Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    >> to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    >> in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.
    >>
    >> Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    >> moulds, oval in shape).
    >>
    >> 1 lb mince (ground beef)
    >> water
    >> salt
    >> pepper
    >> worcestershire sauce (optional)
    >> dried beef stock powder (optional)
    >>
    >> In a pot, add a little oil, heat, and add mince. Brown, breaking up
    >> any lumps.
    >> Add enough water to cover the meat, but don't add too little. The
    >> water will become the gravy.
    >> Add 1 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, a good dash of worcestershire
    >> sauce (if desired). I would add a teaspoon of dried beef stock.
    >> Simmer 30 minutes
    >> Thicken with a slurry of flour and water (you don't want it runny).
    >> Simmer a little longer for flour to absorb.
    >>
    >> Using flaky pastry, roll out, and using a pie mould, cut the bases
    >> large enough to overlap when put in the tins. Cut tops the same way,
    >> making them smaller. Grease pie tins and place a base in each tin.
    >> Fill with the cooked mince, top with a pastry lid and seal the edges.
    >> Brush with beaten egg (if desired for glaze. It's cosmetic only).
    >> Using end of sharp knife, make one or two steam openings in the lid.
    >> Bake at about 350F for about 30 minutes (relying on memory here, so it
    >> might be longer), or till pastry is cooked through.
    >>
    >> Note: Don't roll the bases too thin. A pie is traditionally eaten in
    >> the hand, so you don't want it to fall to pieces or sag.
    >>
    >> That's my recipe for a mince pie. As you can see, it hasn't many
    >> ingredients. It's really just mince and seasonings. But there are many
    >> variations on that theme and many different types of pies. I like
    >> "chicken and mushroom" pies too. Most stews or casseroles that use
    >> boneless meat and which don't have large chunky veges can be used as
    >> fillings for pies. And of course, instead of individual pies, you can
    >> make a large pie for the family. It should be a shallow pie, not a
    >> deep one.
    >>
    >> Kathy in NZ
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
     
  19. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 13:30:21 GMT, [email protected] (Phred)
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Kathy in NZ) wrote:
    >>Wayne
    >>
    >>Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    >>to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    >>in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.

    >
    >They've just banned meat pies and other "junk food" at all government
    >schools (or only primary schools?) in Qld. Some items will be allowed
    >once or twice a year on special occasions at a school.
    >
    >This bloody Labor mob is gradually going right overboard in
    >legislating to run people's lives for them. It won't be long before
    >we all have to use only Premier Pete's Pink Poop Paper.


    >Cheers, Phred.


    Well, pies are our equivalent of the worst in American fast food. It's
    high in fat and cholesterol.

    Recently I had a cholesterol blood test at the doctor's . It had gone
    up steeply.

    "What have you been eating?" asked the doc, amazed.

    "A winter of pies," I confessed. And I had. After years without eating
    pies last winter I overindulged and it showed up in my cholesterol
    test.

    Warning: pies are an ocassional indulgence, not an every night/day .
    They should not be on the menu in schools.

    Kathy in NZ
     
  20. Kathy in NZ

    Kathy in NZ Guest

    On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 16:31:40 GMT, "Lefty" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Kathy in NZ" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]
    >> Wayne
    >>
    >> Individual meat pies are classic fast food in NZ. See for yourself. Go
    >> to google.co.nz, put mince pie in the search field, click on "search
    >> in NZ", and see how many schools have it on the lunch orders.
    >>
    >> Here's how I would make mince pies. (I have half a dozen indivual pie
    >> moulds, oval in shape).
    >>
    >> 1 lb mince (ground beef)
    >> water
    >> salt
    >> pepper
    >> worcestershire sauce (optional)
    >> dried beef stock powder (optional)
    >>
    >>> Kathy in NZ

    >
    >Just curious -- is calling ground beef "mince" the origin of "mincemeat"?
    >Seems logical -- if so, what is the term for "mincemeat" in your form of
    >English? If I called pie "mince" in the USA it would probably be taken for
    >meaning "mincemeat pie", the sweet dessert made with ground meat.
    >
    >I'll bet that out of the confusion someone once said "to hell with it, let's
    >just call it hamburger" and it stuck :)
    >--
    >Lefty
    >

    You need to be careful with mince pie recipes to distinguish between
    "Christmas mince pies" and meat "mince pies".

    In NZ (and Britain) a Christmas mince pie would not contain any meat.
    It would contain a selection of dried fruits. Ad yes, it's a dessert
    or cake item. But NO MEAT.

    Kathy in NZ
     
Loading...