Minimum Sole/Cleat/Pedal Axle Distance

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Supabonbon, Jun 2, 2003.

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  1. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    I'm looking into buying my first pair of roadie pedals. I've been using Shimano SPDs. From what I've
    seen, it appears that Look-style cleats raise the shoe sole almost a cm above the pedal axle, which
    would, naturally, change my position on the bike. Question is: which road pedals offer the least
    distance between axle and shoe-sole. Are there any comparable to that of SPDs?

    SBB
     
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  2. Paul Kopit

    Paul Kopit Guest

    On 2 Jun 2003 12:02:16 -0700, [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote:

    >I'm looking into buying my first pair of roadie pedals. I've been using Shimano SPDs. From what
    >I've seen, it appears that Look-style cleats raise the shoe sole almost a cm above the pedal axle,
    >which would, naturally, change my position on the bike. Question is: which road pedals offer the
    >least distance between axle and shoe-sole. Are there any comparable to that of SPDs?
    >
    >SBB

    It not only varies by pedal but by shoe. My Specialized road and MTB shoes have thicker soles than
    the Shimano models. You'll have more difference between shoes than pedals on SPD pedals. The latest
    Shimano pedal claims to have a low pedal to axel. I don't see how it can make a significant
    difference.

    BTW, I've seen prototype pedals where the bottom of your foot is at the pedal axel. Some real racers
    are experimenting with them.
     
  3. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    Paul Kopit <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 2 Jun 2003 12:02:16 -0700, [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote:
    >
    > >I'm looking into buying my first pair of roadie pedals. I've been using Shimano SPDs. From what
    > >I've seen, it appears that Look-style cleats raise the shoe sole almost a cm above the pedal
    > >axle, which would, naturally, change my position on the bike. Question is: which road pedals
    > >offer the least distance between axle and shoe-sole. Are there any comparable to that of SPDs?
    > >
    > >/s
    >
    > It not only varies by pedal but by shoe. My Specialized road and MTB shoes have thicker soles than
    > the Shimano models. You'll have more difference between shoes than pedals on SPD pedals. The
    > latest Shimano pedal claims to have a low pedal to axel. I don't see how it can make a significant
    > difference.
    >
    > BTW, I've seen prototype pedals where the bottom of your foot is at the pedal axel. Some real
    > racers are experimenting with them.

    Thanks Paul. I guess another part of my question regards adaptors. I'd imagine that if I bought a
    pair of Shimano shoes with Shimano pedals, I'd avoid an adaptor and thereby bring my foot closer to
    the axle. So, the pedal I chose would influence the choice of shoe, and vice versa. I've got Sidi
    Dominators now, and they're great. I was planning on getting a pair of Geniuses, but, again, I'm
    interested to know how this would work in a system....

    /s
     
  4. "supabonbon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Thanks Paul. I guess another part of my question regards adaptors. I'd imagine that if I bought a
    > pair of Shimano shoes with Shimano pedals, I'd avoid an adaptor and thereby bring my foot closer
    > to the axle. So, the pedal I chose would influence the choice of shoe, and vice versa. I've got
    > Sidi Dominators now, and they're great. I was planning on getting a pair of Geniuses, but, again,
    > I'm interested to know how this would work in a system....
    >
    > /s

    The Sidi's are great shoes, I just recently bought a pair of Genius's. The road shoes come standard
    with a Look compatable shoe interface, but you can get SPD compatable adaptors for an extra $15 or
    so. If you have 2 pairs of shoes (one road and one mountain), you'll obviously have 2 pairs of
    pedals. I would recommend going with a road specific pedal like Look's, Campy's, Shimano's for the
    road ride. I like the bigger platform and the feel of the road pedals/cleats on that bike, but still
    run SPDs on the mountain bikes. I do believe that Sidis with the SPD adaptor will get your foot a
    little further off the pedal, but I don't believe it will be an inconvenience. It's not like any
    road cleat I have seen will keep your foot very close to the pedals.
    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove .nospam. if replying)
     
  5. John Everett

    John Everett Guest

    On 2 Jun 2003 12:02:16 -0700, [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote:

    >I'm looking into buying my first pair of roadie pedals. I've been using Shimano SPDs. From what
    >I've seen, it appears that Look-style cleats raise the shoe sole almost a cm above the pedal axle,
    >which would, naturally, change my position on the bike. Question is: which road pedals offer the
    >least distance between axle and shoe-sole. Are there any comparable to that of SPDs?

    I'm not sure it makes any difference. Three of my bikes are set up with Look pedals. I ride these
    with Sidi Energy shoes. My touring bike and mountain bike have SPDs. I ride these with el cheapo
    Performance Primo shoes. I have the saddles on all five bikes set up exactly the same distance from
    the bottom bracket axle. I've never noticed any difference while riding.

    jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3
     
  6. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    John Everett <[email protected]AT.UCE.BOTS.net> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On 2 Jun 2003 12:02:16 -0700, [email protected] (supabonbon) wrote:
    >
    > >I'm looking into buying my first pair of roadie pedals. I've been using Shimano SPDs. From what
    > >I've seen, it appears that Look-style cleats raise the shoe sole almost a cm above the pedal
    > >axle, which would, naturally, change my position on the bike. Question is: which road pedals
    > >offer the least distance between axle and shoe-sole. Are there any comparable to that of SPDs?
    >
    > I'm not sure it makes any difference. Three of my bikes are set up with Look pedals. I ride these
    > with Sidi Energy shoes. My touring bike and mountain bike have SPDs. I ride these with el cheapo
    > Performance Primo shoes. I have the saddles on all five bikes set up exactly the same distance
    > from the bottom bracket axle. I've never noticed any difference while riding.
    >
    >
    > jeverett3<AT>earthlink<DOT>net http://home.earthlink.net/~jeverett3

    Thanks -- the problem, as I see it, is that my foot will be, say, 1cm further from the axle than
    with my current setup. Which raises my seat up a cm, which isn't a problem. However, my stem is at
    the top of the steerer tube, so I can't raise that accordingly. I could get a new stem, but I'd like
    to explore other options. I know 1cm may not sound like much of a disturbance, but I've got a bad
    back and it has taken me a while to get the right position (which may already be a bit too hunched
    over.) And a minor discomfort, over many miles, becomes a major one. /s
     
  7. Supabonbon

    Supabonbon Guest

    "Craig Brossman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "supabonbon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Thanks Paul. I guess another part of my question regards adaptors. I'd imagine that if I bought
    > > a pair of Shimano shoes with Shimano pedals, I'd avoid an adaptor and thereby bring my foot
    > > closer to the axle. So, the pedal I chose would influence the choice of shoe, and vice versa.
    > > I've got Sidi Dominators now, and they're great. I was planning on getting a pair of Geniuses,
    > > but, again, I'm interested to know how this would work in a system....
    > >
    > > /s
    >
    > The Sidi's are great shoes, I just recently bought a pair of Genius's. The road shoes come
    > standard with a Look compatable shoe interface, but you can get SPD compatable adaptors for an
    > extra $15 or so. If you have 2 pairs of shoes (one road and one mountain), you'll obviously
    > have 2 pairs of pedals. I would recommend going with a road specific pedal like Look's,
    > Campy's, Shimano's for the road ride. I like the bigger platform and the feel of the road
    > pedals/cleats on that bike, but still run SPDs on the mountain bikes. I do believe that Sidis
    > with the SPD adaptor will get your foot a little further off the pedal, but I don't believe it
    > will be an inconvenience. It's not like any road cleat I have seen will keep your foot very
    > close to the pedals.

    Thanks Craig. Your preaching to the choir, though. I've worn my Dominators almost daily for 5 years
    and they're still going strong. The only problem is that on long rides (I'm doing a 207 miler in a
    week) I get some foot burn because of the small contact area of SPDs. I'd like to try regular road
    pedals, hence the question -- which road pedals/shoes will make the distance from the center of the
    axle to the bottom of the foot as close as my SPDs do? Yes, I could change the height of the seat to
    keep my leg's extension the same, but my stem is currently at the top of a stack of spacers. /s
     
  8. "supabonbon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > "Craig Brossman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > "supabonbon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > > > Thanks Paul. I guess another part of my question regards adaptors. I'd imagine that if I
    > > > bought a pair of Shimano shoes with Shimano pedals, I'd avoid an adaptor and thereby bring my
    > > > foot closer to the axle. So, the pedal I chose would influence the choice of shoe, and vice
    > > > versa. I've got Sidi Dominators now, and they're great. I was planning on getting a pair of
    > > > Geniuses, but, again, I'm interested to know how this would work in a system....
    > > >
    > > > /s
    > >
    > > The Sidi's are great shoes, I just recently bought a pair of Genius's.
    The
    > > road shoes come standard with a Look compatable shoe interface, but you
    can
    > > get SPD compatable adaptors for an extra $15 or so. If you have 2 pairs of shoes (one road and
    > > one mountain), you'll
    obviously
    > > have 2 pairs of pedals. I would recommend going with a road specific
    pedal
    > > like Look's, Campy's, Shimano's for the road ride. I like the bigger platform and the feel of
    > > the road pedals/cleats on that bike, but still
    run
    > > SPDs on the mountain bikes. I do believe that Sidis with the SPD adaptor will get your foot a
    > > little further off the pedal, but I don't believe it will be an inconvenience.
    It's
    > > not like any road cleat I have seen will keep your foot very close to
    the
    > > pedals.
    >
    > Thanks Craig. Your preaching to the choir, though. I've worn my Dominators almost daily for 5
    > years and they're still going strong. The only problem is that on long rides (I'm doing a 207
    > miler in a week) I get some foot burn because of the small contact area of SPDs. I'd like to try
    > regular road pedals, hence the question -- which road pedals/shoes will make the distance from the
    > center of the axle to the bottom of the foot as close as my SPDs do? Yes, I could change the
    > height of the seat to keep my leg's extension the same, but my stem is currently at the top of a
    > stack of spacers. /s

    Oh sorry, perhaps I didn't understand the question. I have the Sidi's Genius 4 (Megas) with the
    Shimano Ultegra road pedal/cleats. One of the things they advertise with this pedal is a lower
    profile to the shoe. I cannot really give you a comparison with other pedals/cleats, these are my
    first road setup. Perhaps your LBS can comment better on Shimano's claim.
    --
    Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado (remove .nospam. if replying)
     
  9. supabonbon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Thanks Craig. Your preaching to the choir, though. I've worn my Dominators almost daily for 5
    > years and they're still going strong. The only problem is that on long rides (I'm doing a 207
    > miler in a week) I get some foot burn because of the small contact area of SPDs. I'd like to try
    > regular road pedals, hence the question -- which road pedals/shoes will make the distance from the
    > center of the axle to the bottom of the foot as close as my SPDs do? Yes, I could change the
    > height of the seat to keep my leg's extension the same, but my stem is currently at the top of a
    > stack of spacers.

    Time (road) and Speedplay both advertise low sole-axle distance as a "feature." SPDs aren't really
    very close to the axle, farther than older Time road pedals certainly.

    The time that I had a foot burn problem on SPDs, moving the cleat back solved it. BTW, nobody ever
    seems to complain about foot burn on Time ATACs, either, including me. I don't know if there's a
    real difference from SPDs or it's just that those of us in the ATAC cult wouldn't admit it.

    A 207 mile ride will probably tell you all sorts of things about your position. Make sure to take
    whatever tools you need to adjust your seat position.
     
  10. S S

    S S Guest

    > Question is: which road pedals offer the least distance between axle and shoe-sole.

    Sidi Genius shoes (or similar) with Speedplay Zero pedals offer very close shoe to axle. Plus the
    pedal body is very thin which increases cornering clearance. It is also two sided so step in is
    super easy.

    This review explains it all: http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/reviews/speed0.shtml
     
  11. Coombe Pro is probably the lowest of the low.

    http://www.coombe.com/coombe_pro_pedal_system.html

    Haven't tried them myself. Engagement looks like it could be tricky to master (but I have no
    evidence).

    Speedplay X or Zero are excellent in this respect (I have X2).
     
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